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July 26, 1960 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-26

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FOUR

THE MICII IGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY,

..

irates Whip St. Louis;
fights Mark Red's in

Teammates To Debate Piersall's Behavi
'.,h%9

ST. LOUIS (P) - Bob Friend
estored the Pittsburgh Pirates to
Irst place in the National League
ast night by pitching the Bucs to
3 4 to 2 victory over the St. Louise
ardinals. Pittsburgh, which had
elinquished the lead for one day
o Milwaukee, went one-half game
%head of the idle Braves.
Three Pittsburghrhome runs
were the telling blows. Bob Skin-
ner broke a 2-2 tie in the eighth
y hitting his twelfth circuit blow
ind Bob Clemente added to the
Pirates' margin by socking his
eventh. Both homers came with
none on base and were hit off re-
lever Ronnie Kline.
Virdon Clouts Homer
Bill Virdon hit his fifth home
un in the sixth inning against
arry Jackson, who was seeking
his thirteenth victory. Jackson was
emoved for a pinch-hitter in the
eventh inning after the Cardinals
iad tied the score. Kline, the los-
r, now has a 3-8 record.
Stan ,Musial homered for St.
Louis in the second inning. It was
his ninth of the year.
Friend Needs Assist
Tpe Pirates added another run
in the seventh on Rocky Nelson's
single, Clemente's sacrifice and.
3111 Mazeroski's single.
The Cardinals scored their other
un on Daryl Spencer's infield hit
and pinch hitter George Crowe's
single after Alex Grammas was
brown out in the seventh.
Friend, who gained his eleventh
riumph against six losses, needed
an assist from Elroy Face in the
ninth. With two Cardinal runners
n base and two out, Face came
n to retire pinch-hitter Ken Boy-
er for the final out.
The defeat ended a Cardinal
winning streak at four games and
Iropped the fourth - place Red-
birds five games behind Pitts-
burgh.
St. Louis made nine hits off
Friend, with three of them, all
ingles, by Alex Grammas. Gram-
mas is filling in for Boyer, who is
being rested because of an injury.
* * - *
Cincinnati Beats Chicago
CHICAGO (P) - The Cincin-

nati Reds yesterday ended a four-
game losing streak with a rallying
6-5 victory over the last place
Chicago Cubs in a game that
mainly was marked by this ac-
tion:
1) Ernie Banks was carried from
the field after being hit in the
left knee with a Don Newcombe
pitch.
2) Newcombe complained pitch-
er Bob Anderson was throwing at
his legs when his turn came at the
plate.
3) Pitchere Joe Nuxhall had to
be wrestled to the ground in the
eighth inning to keep from bat-
tling umpire Ed Vargo, whom he
had shoved nearly off his feet
following a call at first base.
Not Serious Injury
Banks, going to the plate for
the first time in the second inning,
fell writhing to the ground and

was carried from the field on a
stretcher. The league's "Most Val-
uable Player" the last two years
later was resting comfortably and
a preliminary examination show-
ed no damage. It was expected he
would be back in action today in
his ยง89th consecutive game. X-
rays were negative.
New Newcombe came up In the
third, fireballer Bob Anderson be-
gan pitching him tight. Newcombe
had words with catcher Moe
Thacker and plate umpire Ken
Burkhart, motioning that Ander-
son was aiming at his legs. New-
combe finally walked, without
further incident.
The Cubs, seemingly irate, clob-
bered Newcombe with a four-run
fourth, powered by, George Alt-
man's three-run homer.
Rally Shells Anderson
The Cubs carried a 5-0 lead un-
til a walk and two singles brought
a Red run in the seventh. Ander-
son was shelled in a three -run
eighth keyed by singles by Eddie
Kasko and Vada Pinson and Frank
Robinson's double.
Cincinnati pushed over two runs
in the ninth on singles by Lee
Cardenas, pinch-hitter Gus Bell
and Pinson and sacrifice flies by
Kasko and Harry Anderson.
Nuxhall Blows Up
Nuxhall's big blow up came
when Altman beat out an infield
hit. Nuxhall covered first on the
play and took the throw from first
baseman Gordon Colemnan. When
first base umpire Vargo called Alt-
man safe, Nuxhall charged him
and nearly knocked him off his
feet. It appeared to be a bump or
a shove.
Manager Fred Htuchinson tried
to restrain Nuxhall, but to no
avail. Then Martin and Coleman
jumped on him and wrestled him
to the ground to prevent a further
attack on Vargo.
Nuxhall angrily threw a bat out
on the field when re returned to
the dugout. He was replaced by
Jim Brosnan, the former Cub, who
was credited with the victory. A
fine for Nuxhall will not doubt be
levied today or tomorrow.

ON THE MATS-U.S. Olympic grapplers practice the style of
wrestling that will be required in Rome next month. The Ameri-
can college group, strong on their feet, are still weak in the
"Par Terre" phases of the sport.
Robe rtson Discusses
OlypicWrestling

NEW YORK (P)-A repentent
Jimmy Piersall was slated to sit
outisde the visting clubhouse at
Yankee Stadium tonight while in-
side his Cleveland teammates,
were deciding what to do about:
him in a .meeting with manager
Joe Gordon.
The meeting was arranged at
the request of Harvey Kuenn, the
Indians' player representative,
following complaints by several
Cleveland players that Piersall
was hurting the club and making
the other players nervous with his
antics on the field and his con-
stant wrangling with the umpires.
Talks With Cronin
The players' complaint came at
just about the time the excitable
center field star of the Indians
was promising Afierican League
president Joe Cronin he would
concentrate strictly on baseball.
"I've' been very wrong," the 30-
year-old Piersall said following
his 50-minute conference with
Cronin, during which he paid a
$100 fine for being thrown out
of last Saturday's game in Boston,
his sixth ejection of the season.
"I've built up a lot of high
strung emotions over nothing.
From now on, I'm going to cut
out the horse play and 'concen-
trate on baseball."
Desires To Win
Cronin, who attributed Pier-
sail's frequent battles with the
umpires (which have cost him
$350 in fnes) to his intense desire
to win, said he talked to Jimmy
like a Dutch uncle. Cronin was
Piersall's boss when Jimmy was
with the Red Sox and Joe was.
general manager.
"It's a darn shame Jimmy has
been acting this way," Cronin
said. "His antics have been' dis-
tracting from his wonderful abil-
ity."
Cronin's sympathy apparently
is not shared by the Cleveland
players, at least some of them.
"Piersall should be suspended."
said one. "He has gotten us all
nervous. The way we're going now,

we're not going to win the pen-.
nant unless something is done to
control him."
'Kuenn denied that the players
wanted punitive action taken.
against Piersall. He said the rea-
son for the meeting was to see
whether something can be done to
help both Piersall and the club.
"We're all in sympathy with
Jimmy but it's reached a point
where his antics on the field and.
his constant wrangles with the
umpires has the fellows pretty

9000 POINTS:
Decathlon King Johnson

Anticipates New 'ReCcord
TOR ANr7EL.T W (A')C'a,mt~itwI _

NORMAN, Okla. (AP)-"It's just'
like our Oklahoma football team
trying to play rugby-some. of the
basic -skills like running are the
same, but being a good football
player doesn't necessarily make a
good rugby player."
That's how Port Robertson,
coach of the U.S. Olympic wres-
tling team, compares Uncle Sam's
grapplers with those from the rest
of the world.
Olympic Styles Different
Robertson, former University of
Oklahoma wrestling coach, got his
boys together for their first work-
out Friday. He was pleased that
all were within the weight limit
he had prescribed.
Robertson has until August 1
to teach his grapplers as much as
he can about Olympic style wres-
tling. Most of them have wrestled
American college style most of
their competitive careers. There's
a lot of difference between the
styles.
"It's not a situation of learn-,
ing new holds-they all know how'
to do that. It's simply a matter of
reaction," says Robertson. "With
their slight experience in the
Olympic style, it's real difficult to
get reaction. And if you don't re-
act, you're in afix."
Robertson points out that the
rest of the world's amateur wres-
tIers follow the Olympic style from
their first day on the mat. Reac-
tion is instinctive with them.

ALR.It'...flJ ** { . ' la .J V *1"-
Rafer Johnson predicted yester-
day it will take a world record to
win the decathlon in the Olympic
games in aome this summer, add-
ing that 9,000 points or more is
humanly possible.
The towering ex-UCLA athlete,
speaking at a' track and field,
writer's luncheon,'said he believes
C. K. Yang, a student at UCLA
but an Olympic competitor for
Nationalist China, will prove his
stiffest competition.
Rafer surpassed the world rec-
ord with 8,683 points in the recent
National AAU Decathlon Cham-
pion at Eugene, Ore., with Yang
second.
Asked about Russia's Vasily
Kuznetsov, with whom he has
been swapping thehworld record
for several years, Johnson replied:
"I am always looking forward,
to meeting him. It. has been a
great competition."-
Asked about the so-called 9,000
ceiling, Johnson said it was not
impossible "if I had two good'
days." The decathlon is held, five
events each, on two days.

well upset. To a certain exti
it's hurting the team.
"It's not our purpose to ask
restrictive measures against P;
sal.. We don't want his bench,
He's having a great year and
want him in the lineup.
"But something should be d
about him. We hope to come
with some sort of remedy,
players feel if we talked this thi
over with the manager, quie
and sensibly, we might come
with the answer."

Johnson had praise for Dave
Edstrom of Oregon, hampered by
a bad leg in the meet at Eugene.
If Edstrom rounds into shape he
could be quite a factor for the
United States at Rome, Johnson
said.
The all-around athlete said he
must work on every event but that
in the nekt few weeks he will
concentrate on the pole vault, the
hurdles and the high Jump.
Fieldhouse
About $100 in athletic equip-
ment was reported stolen from-
Yost Fieldhouse between Friday
afternoon and yesterday morn-
ing.
Henry Hatch, equipment super-
visor, told police that tee-shirts,
shorts, and football shoes were
taken. Entry to the second floor
equipment room was gained by
forcing a door, Hatch explained.

Robertson, always known as a
brilliant offensive coach, says he
will concentrate on defense, par-
ticularly in the so-called "Par
Terre" position where the wrestler
assumes a defensive position on
the mat.
"Our boys are relatively better
on their feet than they are on the
mat," he says. "I guess this comes
from the fact that so much of the
college style depends on good foot-
work.
"At any rate, the Europeans
know this. I imagine they will be
very'careful on their feet, knowing
that we are much weaker at Par
Terre. So we are going to concen-
trate on that as much as we can
in the short time we have."
Most of the 35 grapplers here
are ranked 1-2-3 on the basis of
their finish in the National Olym-
pic tryouts at Ames, Iowa, in
May. A few were added to the
team later because illness kept
them from the trials.
Hunt Coaches Greco-Roman
The final team trials will begin
here Aug. 1, move to Stillwater,
Okla., Aug. 3, and wind up here
Aug. 5.
Robertson is coachng the U.S.
freestyle team and Briggs Hunt,
veteran UCLA coach, is handling
the Greco-Roman team. Holds are
limited to above the waist in
Greco-Roman wrestling.
0 ~ TUUL ~~AL / hA

BILL VIRDON
. . . homers in sixth

4TTING LEADERS:
Al Smith's Comeback Sparks Chisox

i
I
r
,,

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

PERSONAL

COMING-The Duke - Louie - Can-
nonball-- The Count - Brubeck -
Dinah - Nina - Dakota plus others.
American Jazz Festival. Detroit -
August 19-21 - Tickets on sale Music
Center, 300 S. Thayer. F53

NEW YORK A')-Nellie Fox isn't
having nearly as good a season as
he did a year ago. Neither is Luis
Aparicio nor Early Wynn.
So, why are the Chicago White
Sox holding down first place in the
American League?
Minnie Minoso's consistent hit-
ting has had a lot to do with it.
So has Roy Sievers' run-producing
ability. However, the major reason#
could be the unexpected comeback
of Al Smith.#

Smith batted only .237 in 1959.1
Last week he'hiked his 1960 aver-
age nine points to .322 with 11
hits in 26 tries. The 32-year-old
outfielder trails only batting
leader Bill Skowron of New York,
.344 and Minoso, the runner-up at
.323.
Smith finished with a .306 mark
for Cleveland in 1955. He slumped
to .274 and .247 in the next two
campaigns with the Indians and
then wound up at .252 in 1958-
his first year with the White Sox.
Minoso gained eight points in
last week's action. He had 12 safe-
ties in 30 at bats and climbed from
third place.
Skowron enjoyed his best week
of the season while his club dip-
ped into second place behind the
defending league champions.
The muscular first baseman
boosted his average 24 points on
the strength of 16 hits in 28 trips
(a .571 pace).
The National League batting
race has developed into a two-
man affair between Norm Larker
of Los Angeles and Willie Mays
of San Francisco. Both lost ground
last week, Larker slumping seven
points to .344 and Mays five points
to .343. Larker had six hits in 21
times at Bat and Mays had 6-for-
S22.
Hank Aaron of Milwaukee took
over the senior circuit's home run
lead from Chicago's Ernie Banks.
The Braves' star slammed four
homers, giving him 28 for the
campaign.
Banks had only a single circuit
blow, putting his total at 27.
Banks, however, maintained his
lead in runs batted in with 80-
four more than Aaron.

Roger Maris continued to pace
the American League in home runs
with 31 and RBI's, 78. Skowron is
second in RBI's with 67 followed
by Jim Gentile of Baltimore and
Minoso with 61 apiece and Jim
Lemon of Washington, 60.
Sievers, a .305 batter, has driven
in 55 runs. Fox, the AL's most val-
uable player in 1959 when he hit
.306, is down to .270. Aparicio's
average is .251 while Wynn, a 22-
game winner last year, has only
five 1960 victories.
AMIERICAN LEAGUE
Player and Club AE H Ptt.
Skowron, New York ...305 102 .334
Mlinoso, Chicago.....344 111 .3?3
Smith, Chicago........39 109 .3?z
Gentile, Baltimore ... 210 67 .3151
Aspromonte, Cleveland 207 66 .319
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Player and Club AB H Pct.
Larker, Los Angeles .. .215 74 .344
Mays, San Francisco . .338 116 .343
Ashburn, Chicago .....332 107 .322
Groat, Pittsburgh.392 124 .316
Clemente, Pittsburgh . .342 108 .316

2
3
4

ONE DAY
96
1.12

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
.39
.54

At Olympic Village Opening

Figure 5 average words to o line
Call Classified between 1 -00 and 3:00 Mon thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phone NO 2.4786

ROME (MP-The Olympic village
was opened yesterday with an ap-
peal to the nations of the world
to put aside their cold war rival-
ries at least for the duration of
the Games, Aug. 25-Sept. 11.
Giulio Andreotti, Italian defense
minister and president of the
Olympic Organizing Committee,
made the plea as he formally in-
augurated the village where 7,000

__________________________________________________________________________1

1I

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
Chiicago.....52
New York .49
Baltimore......51
Cleveland ......47
Washington ....43
Detroit .........42
Boston........36
Kansas City ....33
YESTERDAY'S

L Pct.
38 .578
37 .570
43 .543
40 .540
44 .494
45 .483
52 .409
54 .379
GAMES

GB
1
3
3i;
7'
81-.
15
17a

(Including night games
July 25.)'

NATIONAL LEAGUE

of Monday,

(No games scheduled)
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Chicago 6-2, New York 3-8
Boston 10-7, Cleveland 6-6
Kansas City 6-2, Washington 3-10
Baltimore 2, Detroit 1 (11 innings)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago at Boston 7:15 p.m.
Cleveland at New York 7 p.m.
Kansas City at BiItimore 7:05 p.m.

W L Pet. GV
Pittsburgh .....54 37 .593
Milwaukee ....52 36 .591
Los Angeles.48 40 .545 41
St. Lousi ...49 42 .538 511
San Francisco ..45 42 .517 7
Cincinnati .....41 49 .456 12'
Philadelphia ...35 55 .389 18
Chicago ........33 56 .371 20
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 2
Cincinnati 6, Chicago 5
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 6, Pittsburgh 1
Milwaukee 3, Chicago 0
Los Angeles 2, PhiladelphiaI
St. Louis 7, Cincinnati 5
(10 innings)
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Francisco
10:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago 1:30 p.m.

B
r2

athletes from 87 countries will live
and train.
He recalled that the ancient
Greeks suspended all wars and
hostilities during their Olympic
games so the athletes could par-
ticipate in peace-even those from
warring rivals.
Suggesting that the various
Olympic committees in each coun-
try appeal to their governments
and "perhaps even take collective
action" at the United Nations, An-
dreotti said:
"To bring serenity to peoples'
minds, even for a brief time, could
have an incalculable value. Be-
sides, who knows but that in the
future one may be able to credit
the 17th Olympid games with hav-
ing lightened things at a grave
moment of international tension."
Pennsylvania
Tennis Meet
In 2nd Round
HAVERFORD, Pa. (4) - Mar-
garet Varner, eighth-seeded player
from Wilmington, Del., rallied
from the loss of the first set to
reach the second round of the 61st
Pennsylvania Lawn Tennis Cham-
pionship yesterday by defeating
Sheila Maroshick, a Brooklyn
school teacher, 3-6, 6-1, 6-0 at
Merion Cricket Club.
Miss Maroshick, runnerup for
the New Jersey title, was playing
her first match on grass courts.
Other seeded players advanced
with less trouble. They included
Janet Hopps, Seattle, Wash.;
Mrs. William\ DuPolit, Jr., Wil-
mington, Del.; Mimi Arnold, Red-
wood City, Calif.; Gwyneth Thom-
as, Shaker Heights, Ohio, and Bel-
mar Gunderson, Chambersburg,
Pa.
Miss Hopps, captain of the U.S.
Wightman Cup team, defeated
Mrs. CarterSimonin, Philadel-
phia. 6-2. 6-2. Miss Hons is seeded

300 S. Thayer

NO 2-2500
xRi

AL SMITH
.. aids Chicago effort

WANTED TO BUY
55-57 VOLKSWAGEN. Phone NO 3-
4339. K I
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
MUSIC CENTER
Headquarters for
Hi Fi Stereo Record Players
Tape Recorders
Accessories and Service
Complete Service Department
37 Years Experience

A

V,

Run awhile-to
Beavers Bike and

DISTINCTIVE
HAIRSTYLING
for the Whole Family!
10 Haircutters
No appt's needed
The Doscolo Barbers'
Near Michigan Theatre

PIANOS
Buy Now before 'the fall rush. No
Payments till school starts. Free
Lessons included.
UPRIGHTS-From $59.50.
GRANDS-From $395.
USED LESTER SPINET-Beautiful
blonde, mahogany finish. New
$795, now $479.
GET ON THE FESTIVAL BAND
WAGON -Ends July 30. Savings
up to $500 on such makes' as Stein-
way, Knabe, Geo. Steck, Leonard,
Clayton, Vose, etc. Also Grinnell's.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main St.
X10
Complete line of Hi Fl components
including kits; complete service on
radios, phonographs and
Hi F1l equipments.

i

BUSINESS SERVICES
CONVENTION TIME
Snack-time Goodies
at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
"Open every night 'til Midnight"
J30
REWEAVING-Buras, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4647, J4
TYPING: Theses, term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
JIl
TRANSPORTATION
YOUNG LADY wishes girl passengers
to L. A. Leaving Aug. 20. GL 3-6185.
References. G6
USED CARS
GOING HOME, so have to sell beautiful
two-toned Plymouth '56. It's loaded!
Call NO 2-0857 or see it at 1120 Oak-
land. N13
1950 BUICK automatic. $50. Call Mar-
shall Franke. NO 2-3164 any meal-
time. N11
1953 PONTIAC. Automatic, new plugs,
exhaust: $245. NO 5-6203 evenings
N12
REAL ESTATE
GRAD STUDENT leaving. Nice 2 bdrm.,
basement, large lot. Phone 3-2595. R1
LAKEWOOD SUBDIVISION: 3 bedroom
ranch. 309 Mason Ave. Near new ele-
mentary school. Landscaped lot. Full
basement. $15,500 FHA. Discount for
conventinal financing. NO 2-8101.

I-M

I

HI1 SCORES

WATCH the GOP Convention on TV
the Cafe Protmetheanl
GOOD BOOKS: Disposing of my la:
library at private sale. Rare opp
tunity for students to build up
library of good books for little mon
Hundreds of books, 100 years old
more. Low prices on sets of books. C
from 12 noon to 4 P.M. daily exci
Sunday. 617 Packard (near State x
WANTED: Garage space near Stockw
for Corvette. Starting -Aug. 1 for
year. Will pay well. Call E. Quad
Strauss. '
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORI
FOREIGN CAR
SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
NYE MOTOR SALES
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
C-TED STANDARD SERVIC
Friendly service is our business
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. Se
us for the best price on new
used tires. Road service-mechant
on duty-
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it "
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
WHITE'S.AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-335
FOR RENT
CAMPUS 3-room nicely furn. apa
ment. Private bath. $87.50. NO 3-4'
3 ROOM nAPARTMENT partly furnish
Washing facilities. $85 a month p
utilities. 401 Pauline Blvd. Can
anytime. Contact Mrs. Mamie Bur
1698 Franklin.
THREEtROOM apartment near camp
Off -treea parking. $75 per mn
Call NO 3-6421 after 5.
FURNISHED APARTMENT for 3.
S. Fifth Ave. Private entrance.

R2
13

Phone NO 2-4786
for Classified Advertising.

PLAYOFF GAMES
Biochemistry 10, Pharmacology 1
ATO 15, Cooley 3
University TV 9, Education 5

SPECIAL

H I F1 STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre

at
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FOR SALE
MODERN 40 FOOT 2 bedroom trailer.
Must 'ell. Call GE 7-5580. B
HI FI PHONOGRAPH: Bozak; speaker
system. Excellent sound. Low price.
NO 2-8081 evenings. B5
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S short-sleeve sport shirt $1.00.
Skip-dents & seer-suckers sanforized
wash & wear, asstd. colors.
Sam's Store 122 E. Washington
Wi

ROOM apartment, partly furnish
Washing facilities. $85 a month p
utilities. 401 Pauline Blvd. Can
anytime. Contact Mrs. Marie u
1698 'Franklin.I

DOUBLE or SINGLE rooms.Gradu
women. Cooking. 517 E. Ann .St.1
2-2a26.
3 ROOM APARTMENT unfurnished
beautiful farm. Nine miles from A
Arbor. Fishing, horseback ridi
swimming. $65. NO 3-6578. C
CAMPUS-Large quiet rooms for m
Low rates. Linens furnished.
3.-4747.

X21

PIANOS-ORGANS NEW &' USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
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