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July 26, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-26

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L7's, 130 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'T

ilogist Makes Weather Prediction for Hemisphere

It 1C "
lot.

196l A.D

t
' '
'y.w> 4y _

* TROPICAL SUBTROPICAL TEMPERATE SUBARCTIC ?- TUDRA ICE

_r

AP Nerasftafnrts LJ

PROF. ERLING DORF-Princeton University geologist, reads long-range weather predictions from the weather's "footprints" on rocks.
He predicts increasingly warmer weather for the next couple of centuries, beginning in about 1965; then a long ice age. The maps show
the hemisphere's general weather conditions approximately 500,0Q0 and 15 million years ago. However, Prof. Dorf warns against easy
acceptance of predictipns based on past conditions, reminds us that we needn't be immediately concerned.

By SID MOODY
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Weather forecast for the future:
cold followed by warmer followed
by tropical birds followed by gla-
ciers.
This is the forecast of a Prince-
ton University professor who be-
lieves the Northern hemisphere,
at least, should enjoy increasingly
shirt sleeved weather for the next
two or three centuries. But things
shouldn't heat up until we get out
of a little cool spot he thinks will
end by 1965.
Eventually, however, Prof. Erling
Dorf says we're in for another ice
age. Don't rush to sell the air con-
ditioner, however. The glaciers
aren't due for another 10,000 to
15,000 years.
Dorf, a geology professor, reads
the weather this way:
"We are living, paradoxically, in
a short cold spell which is part of
a longer warm episode which in
turn is part of a still longer cold
period."
Dorf reads the weather from its
footprints on rocks. Shapes im-
bedded in rocks show that tropical
trees once grew in nothern climes
and Canadian spruces in what are
now subtropical regions.
Tests on the rocks deteremine
approximately when breadfruit
bloomed in Bangor, Maine, and
sub-arctic fir trees in Ft. Lauder-
dale, Fla. This dates the succes-
sive retreats and advances of the
polar ice caps which, of course,
correspond to temperature condi-
tions.
The last time things were fairly
hot in the United States was
roughly 15 million years ago. (See
map) Almost the entire country
was subtropical.

Then it cooled off. Glaciers
rumbled back and forth across the
northern United States as tem-
peratures alternately rose ana fell.
Dorf, writing in "University," a'
Princeton graduate school maga-
zine, says the world is about two-
fifths of the way towards the next
glacial period. Meanwhile there
are smaller temperature trends
within the over-all patterr.
About 1600 weather grew nip-
pier. Glaciers put on size and
'U'ToHost
Musicians
The 1960-61 Choral Union and
Extra Concert Series will begin
Oct. 6 with Hilde Geden, soprano,
and will feature such artists as
Van Cliburn, Arthr Rubinstein,
the Robert Shaw Chorale and
Orchestra, and Zino Francescatti,
violinist.
Remaining season tickets for
both series may now be purchased
from the University Music Society,
Burton Memorial Tower.
Seating charts may be consulted
at the Burton Tower offices. Ad-
vance orders which have been
filled will be mailed to subscribers
in September.
The Boston Symphony Orches-
tra, Warsaw Philharmonic, Dallas
Symphony Orchestra, Toronto
Symphony, and Concertgebouw
Orchestra of Amsterdam are other
expected groups, while Henry
Szeryng, violinist; Jussi Bjoerling,
and Jerome Hines, bass; will also
perform.

destroyed some villages in the Eu-
ropean Alps. This "little ice age"
stopped about 1850, says Dorf, and
it became balmier.
About then the world began to
keep more accurate track of its
weather. Records show for in-
stance, that the United States an-
pual mean teemperature has risen
about 2% degrees fahrenheit
since 1900.
Melting of the polar caps has
raised the level of the ocean 6
inches along the Atlantic coast in
the last 25 years. Winter tempera-
tures in Spitsbergen, Norway, have
risen about 16 degrees since 1910
and the port is free of ice seven
months a year, twice as long as
50 years ago.
Nonetheless, Dorf says we are
in a slightly cooler decade which
is bucking the trend but should
end by 1965. Then the heat will
be on again.
"Unfortunately," says the pro-
fessor, "predictions based on past
performance of weather are no-
toriously even less reliable than
predicting future actions of peo-
ple, race horses or Princeton foot-
ball teams."

AT RACKHAM:
Lectures
Expected
Two colloquia will be presented
today under the auspices of the
speech department.
Prof. G. E. Densmore, of the
department, will discuss "The 1960
Presidential Campaign," at 3 p.m.
in the West Conference Room,
Rackham Building.
Prof. Miriam Pauls, associate
prof. of otolaryngology at Johns
Hopkins University, Baltimore,
will speak on "Breakdowns in the
Hearing and Language Processes,"
also at 3 p.m., in Rackham As-
sembly Hall.
There will be a Linguistic Forum
Lecture on "Thai, Chinese and
Indonesian," by Prof. Soren Ege-
rod, of the University of Copen-
hagen, at 7:30 p.m. in Rackham
Ampitheater.

'U' Regents
Accept Gifts
At Meeting
The Regents accepted two sep-
arate grants totaling $6,550 from
two different Standard Oil units,
in their July meeting.
Standard Oil Company of Cal-
ifornia has given $3,500 for a fel-
lowship in chemical engineering.
Standard Oil Foundation, Inc.,
has given $3,000 for a similar fel-
lowship.
Gifts totaling $6,282 were re-
ceived from the Allied Chemical
Corporation for fellowships in
chemistry and chemical engineer-
ing.
A contribution of $5,000 from
the Schering Foundation, Inc.,
was received for the Pharmacy
Research Building Construction
Fund.
Kenneth H. Campbell Founda-
tion for Neurological Research
has made a grant of $5,000 for
neurological research under the
direction of Dr. Russell N. DeJong.
The Regents accepted $5,000 from
the estate of Dorcas Elisabeth
Campbell to establish the Dorcas
E. Campbell Scholarship.
Four undergraduate scholar-
ships can be provided with the
$4,000 received from the Society
of Naval Architects and Marine
Engineers.
General Motors Corporation
Engineering Staff, G. M. Techni-
cal Center, has given $4,000 for a
doctoral fellowship in automotive
engineering.
A total of $4,875 came from
Parke, Davis & Co., for a fellow-
ship in bacteriology, tissue cul-
ture study and the Pharmacology
Research Fund.
Languages
Studied Here
The University is hosting the
fourth in a five-year series of in-
tensive study programs in Near
Eastern languages this summer.
"It is shocking that people
working in United States embas-
sies in the Near East have prac-
tically no knowledge of the lan-
guages of the country," declares
Prof. George G. Cameron, chair-
man of the Near Eastern Studies
department.
To help correct this situation,
the universities of John Hopkins,
Harvard, Columbia, Michigan and
Princetonreceive $30,000 yearly
from the Ford Foundation to hold
a language training program on
one campus a summer for five
years.
Ninety-one top students from
across the nation are enrolled in
eight weeks of concentrated study
covering the equivalent of an en-
tire school year of training. The
stdents will go on to become
teachers of the languages, Near
East scholars In various fields, or
Foreign Service people.

-David Giltrow
PLAYBILL 'PICNIC'--William Inge's drama about a 'bum' who invades the quiet of a small town
and disrupts the lives of its citizens, especially women, opens tonight at Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
In this scene Hal, played by Marvin Diskin, is teaching Madge, the local beauty, played by Joan
Martin, about real love. Hal leaves town after a short stay, but changes the lives of several of its
characters permanently.
'Picnic Studies Psychology of Women

[

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

Tomorrow, July 27, at 8 P.M.
HILLEL Presents
"The Bible on Broadway"
Second Dialogue: "JOB" and "J.B."
by Dr. WILLIAM F. BAKER & PROF. MARVIN FELH EIM
OPEN TO ALL
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

i

(Continued from Page 2)
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Edna M.
Echelberger, Education; thesis: "Rela-
tionships of Behavior Characteristics
and Peer Status as Indicators of Per-
sonality Development," Tues., July 26,
1600 ,University High School, at 4:00
p.m. Chairman, W. A. Ketcham.
Doctoral Examination for Calvin
Bruce Michael. Education; thesis: "So-
cial Class and Educational Attitudes: A
Study of Their Relationship and of the
Social Composition of Boards of Educa-
tion in Michigan Cities Above 10,000
Population," Tues., July 26, 3206 Uni-
Organization
Notices

veresity High School, at 3:00 p.m. Chair-
man, H. R. Jones.
Placement Notices
On Wed., July 27, the following school
will have representatives at the Bureau
to interview for the 1960-61 school year.
Grand Haven, Mich. - Elem. (6th
Grade); Guidance Director.
For any additional information and
appointments contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Admin. Building,
NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
J. T. Baker Chemical Co. Phillipsburg,
N.J. Recent Chem. or ChE grads in-
terested in development and training
in chem. production. No experience
necessary.
Ginn and Co., Chicago. Colege travel-
er for educational publishers. BA, 32 or
under. No experience necessary.
Fisher Body, Flint. Accountants, No
experience necessary.
Sturgis Chamber of Commerce, Mich-
igan. Executive secretary (Manager).
McKinsey & Co., Inc. Economic re-
search assistant. Man or Woman, mas-
ter's degree in econ, or bus. ad., or at
least some work towards graduate de-
gree.
Battle Creek Area Chamber of Com-
merce. Michigan. Need manager.
For further information, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Building, Ext. 3371.
2ND ANNUAL DETROIT
AdRICAN

ENDING
TONIGHT

i

July 26, 1,0O
Sociedad Hispanica, Guitar & Song-
Fest. 2-Hour Program of Spanish-Amer-
ican Guitar Music & Songs with Audi-
ence Participation, July 27, 8 p.m., 3050
Frieze Bldg. Lounge.
* * *
International Folk Dancers, Meeting
with Dancing and Instruction, July 26,
7:30 p.m., Ann Arbor YM-YWCA, 110
N. 4th Ave.

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