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July 23, 1960 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1960-07-23

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23, 1960 THE MICHIGAN DAILY__

ROSS CAMPUS:
Giovanni' Extends Run;
U' Musicians Perform

U' TV SERIES PRESENTS:
Expansion, Millennium
Flowers To Be Shown

Regents Approve Appointmei

Thirteen faculty appointments
were approved at the Regents
meeting Friday, July 15.

I

f i

A sold-out run of four perform-
ances'of Mozart's operatic master-
piece, "Don Giovanni," has
prompted the Department of
Speech and School of Music to
add a fifth performance of the
opera to the regularly scheduled
Wednesday through Saturday run.
The opera will be presented
again at 8 p.m. August 8, in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
It is directed by Prof. Jack E.
Bender of the speech department
anld Prof. Josef Blatt of the School
of Music. Tickets, available at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre box
office 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. perform-
ance dates and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
other times, are $1.75 and 1.25 for
the Monday performance.
The opera is the final Playbill
presentation of the summer.
Ticket information may be se-
cured by calling NOrmandy 3-"
1511, extension 3383, or NOrman-
dy 8-6300, the box office.
The Stanley Quartet will give
the third and last in its series of
summer session recitals' at 8:30
p.m. Tesday, Aug. 2, in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Members of the Quartet during
the summer are: Stuart Canin and
Gustave Rosseels, violins; Robert
Courte, viola; and Paul O'lefsky,
cello.

The program will be highlight-
ed by a premiere performance of
Paul Cooper's "Quartet Number
Three." He is an assistant pro-
fessor of theory in the music
school here. They will also play
"Quartet in D major, Op. 64, No.
5" by Haydn, and "Quartet in C
major, No. 3" by Beethoven.
The University summer session
choir will present Haydn's "Missa
Solemnis in B Flat Major" at
8:30 p.m. Sunday, July 31 in Hill
Auditorium.
Faculty members with featured
roles are soprano Frances Greer,
tenor Millard Cates and basso
Philip A. Duey. Students featured
are soprano Jean Austin, SM, alto
Mary Burdette, a former student,
basso Edward A. Baird, G, and E.
Lyle Hagert, 60 SM.
S* * *.
Two &oncerts and two degree
recitals will highlight the musical
scene in Ann Arbor next week.
Barbara Holmquest, pianist, will
present a concert at 8:30 p.m.
Monday in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall. At 8:30 p.m. Tuesday the
Baroque Trio, featuring cellist
Douglas Marsh will perform in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
William Eifrig will present an
organ recital as partial fulfillment
of degreerequirements at 8:30
p.m. Wednesday in Hill Auditori-
um. Bassoonist Robert Quayle will
give a degree recital at 8:30 p.m.
Friday in Aditorium A, Angell
Hall.
To Publish
Engineering
Books Soon
Three engineering books will be
published by The University of
Michigan Press for the University
Research Institute during Aug-
ust,
Elliptic Functions with Complex
Arguments was written by F. M.
Henderson of Christchurch, New
Zealand, during a year's visiting
professorship in engineering 'me-
chanics here. The book fills the
need for complex values of elliptic
functions that arises. In connec-
tion with mapping problems of
electromagnetism, hydrodynamics
and other areas.
Prof George C. Ernst, now a
professor of civil engineering at
the University of Nebraska, wrote
Ultimate Moments and Shears in
Continuous Reinforced Concrete
Beams as a result of his work as
research engineer with the Re-
search Institute.
Structural Analysis of 'Uni-
strut' Space-Frame Roofs, in two
volumes, was written by Prof.
Paul H. Coy, formerly of the
Architecture and Design school
here and now of the University of
Illinois. The book is the first trea-
tise to deal analytically with
space-frame construction of any
sort.
Volume A may serve as a text
as well as a reference work, while
Volume B contains precumputed
data that will save architects and
engineers the most tedious part
of the computation work, accord-
ing to the publishers.

PROF. "OBERT C. ELDERFIELD
. ,. named chairman
Elder field
Given Post
In Academy
Prof. Robert C. Elderfield of the
chemistry department has been1
named chairman of the Division
of Chemistry and Chemical Tech-
nology of the National Academyj
of Sciences-National Research
Council.
He succeeds Ernest H. Volwiler,
president of Abbott Laboratories,'
chairman for the past two years.
Prof. Elderfield, who has been
at the University since 1952, has
done extensive research in chemo-
therapy and pharmacology. In
1948 he was awarded the Presi-
dential Certificate of Merit for
his contributions to the field of
malarial drugs while serving with
the Office of Scientific Research:
and Development during World
War IL.
The NAS-NRC is a private or-
ganization of distinguished scien-
tists and engineers dedicated to

A half century of national ex-
pansion westward beyond the Mis-
sissippi is examined in the Uni-
versity's television series Western
Way.
The program, "The Sun Follow-
ers," considers the republic's ter-
ritorial growth from 1803-1853,
during which the country tripled
in size and shaped the national
boundaries we know today. It will
be shown at noon Sunday, July
24, on WWJ-TV.
Prof. Niel Shortum, host for the
series, points out that the nation's
favorite label for glamorizing this
expansion was "Manifest Des-
tiny," a label which emphasized
the mission of Americans to rush
over and subdue the continent.
However, he notes, the people
did not rush across the American
continent. "They crawled, follow-
ing two winding trails which to-
talled 2775 of the slowest and
cruelest miles the west had to
offer."
He makes use of special visual
devices to provide an exciting pic-
ture of the travel of settlers and
traders on the Oregon and Sante
Fe trails, the first great roads to
the west.
In another series program, Un-
derstanding Our World, British
scholar and author Norman Cohn
tells how the doctrine of the mil-
lennium, originally held by early
Christians who expected the sec-
ond coming of Christ, turned
against both Church and proper-
ty-owners in a series of violent
mass uprisings during the Middle
Ages.
"The Millennium" is the title of
this program, to be broadcast over
WXYZ-TV at 9 a.m. Sunday, July
24. Prof. Robert McCleary, Uni-
versity psychologist, interviews
Cohn on the program.
Using a series of drawings from
the Durer Apocalypse Series, Cohn
examines the millennium doc-
trines and ascribes them to "par-
anoic fantasies." The leaders and

an arrangement on camera, so
viewers can get a close-up look at
how it is done.
She has been in Ann Arbor for
two years, but recently returned
to Tokyo.

Prof. Freeman D. Miller, for-
merly professor of astronomy and
associate dean of the Horace H.
Rackham School of Graduate
Studies, was appointed acting
chairman of the astronomy de-
partment for the 1960-61 school
year. The present chairman, Prof.

Leo Goldberg, has resigned to ac-
cept a position at Harvard Uni-
versity,
New acting chairman of the
Germanic languages and litera-
ture department is Prof. Clarence
K. Pott. He will replace the re-
tiring Prof. Henry W. Nordmeyer.
Fries Reappointed
Reappointed as lecturer in the
English department for a year is

Prof. Emeritus Charles C. Fr:
He will continue to supervice,
struction of a group of Pakista
students, whose work is,subsidiz
under' a Ford Foundation gra
administered by the University
Chicago.
Martin C. Schultz, supervisor
the research laboratory of: I
Cleveland Hearing and Spee
Center, was appointed assista
professor of speech for a th
year term. Chui Fan Liu, a che
istry instructor at the Univers
of Connecticutt, was named ass
tant professor of chemistry for
two year term.
Harlan L. Lane, who held a p
doctoral fellowship at Harva
University during the past ye
was appointed assistant profes
of psychology for a three ye
term.
Prof. Finley A. Hooper, ass
tant professor at Wayne Sta
University, was appointed visiti
assistant professor of history on
one-quarter time basis for 1
next year. He will be on can
once a week to give a course
ancient history and to cons
with graduate students.
Medical School Appointments
Prof. Merrill M. Flood, sen
research mathematician in I
Mental Research Institute a
professor of industrial engine
ing has been given the additio,
appointment, without tenure,
professor of mathematical bio1
in the Medical School's psyc
atry department.. Prof. Emerit
Elizabeth C. Crosby was appoint
consultant to the section of neu
surgery in the surgery departme
on a half-time basis for the f
lowing school year.
Joseph 1.. Sinsheimer of 1
College of Pharmacy was nan
associate professor of pharmace
tical chemistry. He was forme
a member of the faculty at 1
University of Rhode Island.
In the naval science depa
ment, Lt. Com. Henry J. ODI
was named associate profes
and Lt. Gerald R. Henry and
Joseph P. Spetz were appoin
assistant professors.
Realtor To Teach
Saginaw realtor Charles
Zwerk has been appointed ana
ministrative assistant in the Ur
versity's real estate certific
program and a real estate lectu
in the Business Administrat
school. He will maintain his re
dence and general real est
brokerage office in Saginaw wh
taking up his duties at the U
versity.

SCALES AND ARPEGGIOS-should be stressed in school music teaching, according to Nilo Hovey,
well-known band clinician. He is in Ann Arbor for the University's annual National Band Canduc-
tors Conference. Hovey also thinks it is a mistake to tell students to take an easy instrument, be-
cause they want the feeling of accomplishment which comes from learning to play the instrument
of their own choice,
Hovey Thinks School Band's Purpose
Extends Past Entertaining Main Street

ROBERT FREIER
... teaching techniques
T'To Lecture
OnTeachinig'
Robert Freier, chairman of the
English department of Osborn'
high school in Detroit, will speak
at four p.m. Monday on "Teach-
ing a Short Story: A Demonstra-
tion Class."
The lecture, a discussion of
Willa Cather's story, "Neighbor
Rosicky," is the last in this sum-
mer's Conference Series for Eng-
lish Teachers. It is open to the
public, in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Freier is past-president of the
Michigan Council of Teachers of
English and co-editor of "Adven-
tures in Modern Literature" and
I "People in Literature."
The conference has dealt with'
the important aspects of teaching
English in the high school, with
emphasis both on curriculum and
classroom problems, from the
point of view of their implications
for a program in English best
adapted to the needs of our time.

furthering science and its use for his followers are convinced that
hman welfare. Althogh not an they are the elect, on a divinely
agency of the government, it is appointed mission to purge the
obligated under the terms of its world of all sin. They see every-
Congressional charter of 1863 to one else as demonds who must be
advise the federal government, destroyed. Unlike other social
upon request, in matters of sci- groups, who aim at specific
entific and technical interest. achievable objectives, they seek
Its eight divisions, embracing perfection. As a result, they lose
all natural science and their pri- touch with reality.
mary applications, include rep- "There are, I believe, close, par-
resentatives of more than 100 allels between Hitler and Lenin
leading scientific and technical and these old movements. Both
societies, liaison representatives aim at transforming the world in
of appropriate government agen- one sweep, by annihilating the
des, and members at large. adversary and establishing an
Prof. Elderfield worked in r- ideal world under their leader,"
search at the Rockefeller Insti- Cohn says.
tute from 1930 to 1936 and then The ancient art of Japanese
taught at Columbia University. flower arrangement Is demon-
He holds an honorary doctor ofs d by a teacher from Tokyo
science degree from Williams Col- straed this week's ACCENT series
lege, where he did his undergrad- on this.
uate studies, in recognition of his pr .
contibuionsto hemitryand Mrs. Morimasa "Yoshioka shows
contributions to chemistry and the basic principles of "Japanese
medical science. '' rw---* . cmA.

Looker Sees
Drop in Voters
Ann Arbor City Clerk Fred J.
Looker announced yesterday that
there are 23,471 voters registered
for the August 2 primary.
Looker added that if voters turn
out as they did in 1956 and 1958,
between 7,500 and 8,000 votes
will be cast Aug. 2.

F.F Cf A IL U
A~ifdEZEI

Flow er Arranging" aided by Prof.
James Crump of the far eastern
languages and literatures depart-
ment. The program will be broad-
cast on WXYZ-TV at 9:45 a.m.
Sunday, July 24.
Mrs. Yoshioka demonstrates the
style of "mori bana," the most
popular of the three basic forms
of arrangement. It is arranged on
a frog, and is most often used in
homes. This art is studied by all
women in Japan and was de-
veloped to "give comfort to daily
living."
Mori bana arrangement is gov-
erned by a set of definite rules of
form and composition. These are
shown on charts which Mrs. Yo-
shioka designed. She also builds
Baird, Wolfson
Study Abroa d
On Fulbrights
Fulbright scholarships for study
abroad during the 1960-61 aca-
demic year have been awarded to
two University graduate students.
Reed M. Baird of Dunedin, Fla.,
will study comparative literature
at the University' of Mainz, Ger-
many. His grant supplements an
award from the University of
Mainz.
Joan L. Wolfson, G, of Bayonne,
N.J., will study French at the
Lycee de Coutances in Manche,
France. Her scholarship is supple-
mented by a French teaching
award,

"Entertaining Main Street
should not be thedsole purpose of
the school band," commented
Nilo Hovey, educational director
of an Indiana Instrument manu-
facturing company.
One of a dozen nationally-
known clinicians at the 12th an-
nual National Band Conductors
Conference at the University,
Hovey added, "The band obvious-
ly entertains the public at foot-
ball games,' and this is fine, but
its real purpose should be wider."
He feels that if we are to justi-
fy this activity in the curriculum,
which makes so many demands on
talented youngsters, we must de-
velop musicianship in the indi-
vidual player. "This will lead to
effective ensemble performance-
the long-range goal of the indi-
vidual performer."
"I think we are seeing to some
extent a return to what mazy
would consider the old-fashioned
method of teaching," he contin-
ued. "That is, giving a little more
attention to mastery of scales and
arpeggios. This is good as these
skills are essential to gaining con-
trol of a musical instrument."
Hovey feels that it is a mistake
to tell a youpgster to take up a
particular instrument because it
is easy.
"The high school youngster of
today wants to be challenged, He
doesn't want to be told that learn-
ing a musical Instrument is easy.
CAFE
PROMETH EAN
-508 E. William --
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ-9-12 p.m.
(75c door charge)
Open daily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
'MAGNIFICENTI".
-Bosley Crowther N.Y. Tmes
From
oepenijc ~
hnt b Technicolor
and

His aim is to learn to play the
instrument of his choice, regard-
less of the difficulties that may be
involved."
The purpose of the instrumental
program in the schools may not

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LINES
2
3
4

be to develop professional. music-
ians, he added, but the teacher
should seek to develop high stand-
ards of proficiency. "We may call
it amateur music but this does
not mean it's not go6d music."

ONE-DAY
80
.96
1.12

A ldswowww%

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
. 39
'.47'
.54

REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom older home, ti
doors from Burns Park at 1138 Ma
tine Pi Large carpeted living-dinli
room plus 12x15 music or TV roo
large hall upstairs suitable for stud;
screened porch and large backyar
excellent dry basement; gas hea
Minimum down payment if desire
Owner leaving town. Phone NO 2-213
LAKEWOOD SUBDIVISION: 3 bedroc
ranch. 309 Mason Ave. Near new el
mentary school. Landscaped lot. FL
basement. $15,500 FHA. Discount f
conventicnal financing. NO 2-8101.
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Man. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

PIANOS

RIEEK

(Continued from Page 2)
General Notices
The Speech Dept. Colloquium with
Dr. Miriam Pauls, of Johns Hopkins
Hospital, previously announced for
Tues., July 26, has been cancelled.
Guest Pianist: Barbara Holmquest
guest pianist, will be heard in a pianoj
recital in Aud. A, Angell Hall on Mon-

day, July 25 at 8:30 p.m. Miss Holm-
quest will include in her program com-
positions by Schumann, Brahms, De-
bussy, Busoni, and Casella. Open to the
public.
Lectures
Lecture: "Teaching a Short Story: A
Demonstration Class" will be discussed
by Robert Freier, Chairman of the De-
partment of English, Osborn Htgh

School, Detroit, on Mon., July 25,
p.m. in Aud. C.

at 4

NOW'
"A production that is

Shows at
1:00-3:30
8:10-8:45

Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
Eugene Stenseth, Pharmaceutical Chem
istry; tresis: "The Preparation of 2-
Ketopolymethylenimines," Man., July
25, 2525 Chemistry Bldg., at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman F. F. Blicke.
Placement Notices
An expanding Company in Pennsyl-
vania needs: Chief Metallurgist, Metal-
lurgist and Product Manager. An eE?
lurgist and Product manager. Experi-
ence required for these positions.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg, Ext. 3371.
Organization
Notices
India Teachers Associaion, A Film
Show, July 23, 7:30 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheatre. No charge.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

PERSONAL
CONFIDENTIAL INTERVIEW with phy-1
sician, nurse, marriage counselor con-
cerning birth control, child spacing,
marriage problems. Planned Parent-
hood clinic, Tuesday, Thursday 7:30
P.M. to 9 P.M. 122 North Fourth Ave.
Fees based on family income. F12
WANTED: Garage space near Stockwell
for Corvette. Starting Aug. 1 for a
year. Will pay well. Call E. Quad 139
Strauss. F48
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service--mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
5S1
WHI'TE'S AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
82
BUSINESS SERVICES
FOR TODAY's breakfast why not buy
some lox, cream cheese, bagels, on-
ion rolls, or assorted Danish pastry?
We also have smoked whitefish, ge-
fitle fish, kosher soups, pastrami, and
corned beef. Shop at Ralph's for these
delicious foods.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
"Open every night 'til Midnight"
J29
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, ioth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4649. J4

BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S short-sleeve sport shirt $1.00.
Skip-dents & seer-suckers sanforized
wash & wear, asstd. colors.
San's Store 122 E. Washington
WI
FOR RENT
THREE ROOM apartment near campus.
Off-streea parking. $75 per month.
Call NO 3-6421 after 5. C37,
FURNISHED APARTMENT for 3. 314
S. Fifth Ave. Private entrance. O2
3 ROOM apartment, partly furnished.
Washing facilities. $85 a month plus
utilities. 401 Pauline Blvd. Can see
anytime. Contact Mrs. Marie Burke,
1698 Franklin. C33
DOUBLE or SINGLE rooms.Graduate
women. Cooking. 517 E. Ann St. NO
2-2826. C36
3 ROOM APARTMENT unfurnished on
beautiful farm. Nine miles from Ann
Arbor. Fishing, horseback 'riding,
swimming. $65. NO 3-6578. C35
PACKARD NEAR STATE. Nicely fur-
nished 2 room apartment. Pritate tile'
bath. Utilities included. $77 per
month. Phone NO 2-7898 or HI 9-2108.
C34
CAMPUS-Large quiet rooms for men.
Low rates. Linens furnished. NO
3-4747. C30
WANTED TO RENT
APT. for responsible couple. Desire to
work off part of rent. Available Sept.
1. Box 12. LI

UPRIGHTS-From $59.50.

GRANDS--From $395.
USED LESTER SPINET-Beautiful
blonde, mahogany finish. New
$795, now $479.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Off-white leather billfold wit
6 keys. Help I'm locked out! Conta
K. Moore, NO 2-3241. A
GET ON THE FEST IVAL BAND
WAGON - Ends July 30. Savings
up to $500 on such makes as Stein-
way, Knabe, Geo. Steck, Leonard,
Clayton, Vose, etc. Also Grinnell's.

Buy Now before the fall rush. Nc
Payments till school starts. Free
Lessons included.

GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main St.

SNNY wy
A6Mct

approximately perfect!
--TIME MAGAZIN
%JAIC RIC AD KARL
NN - EAN" MOEN
NANCY ADotHE ONAL0
!ON - MEW fCRIP -
EVIN yuIS ..
AIJ*66ORAN MILL

bisnd by 9EM VsrA Dsbe co- x. ~*WonI Dwsny Podvti"L

Complete line of Hi F1 componen
including kits; complete service
radios, phonographs and
Hi F1 equipments.
HI F1 STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-31C
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-18
FOR SALE

NOW Late
Tonight
V N02-6264 11 P.M.
NEVER BEFORE ON THE SCREEN I
+1E TJ1 WAR T IF HECHARIOT !

TRANSPORTATION

i

I

Starting
SUNDAY

N

DIAL
0 8-6416

YOUNG LADY wishes girl passengers
to L.. A. Leaving Aug. 20. OL 3-6185.
References. 06
USED CARS
VOLKSWAGEN convertible '56. New

II

_

I

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