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July 22, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

Students Plan

Campus Developmen

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
An exhibit showing a possible
25-year plan for the architectural
redevelopment of the central cam-
pus area is currently on display in
the lobby of the Architecture and
Design Building.
John Ochsner, Clare Gunn,
Walter Kocian, John Grissim,
Jack Haynes, Tom Cheng, and
William Bozas designed the pro-
ject as a requirement for a course
in the Masters Degree Program of
the College of Architecture and
Design.
It is based on an earlier project
by Philip B. Wargelin, Grad., and
John D. Telfer, Grad., which pro-
poses that on the regional level,
Ann Arbor will act as the matrix
of a statewide setup of community
colleges emphasizing the beginning
of undergraduate training.
Centralization
The Wargelin-Telfer plan sug-
gesst that in Ann Arbor, the nu-
cleus, the central campus will be
oriented toward undergraduate
schools and the University's grad-
uate schools, while north campus
is used for engineering and indus-
trial research.
The central campus would in-
clude several school complexes,
such as architecture and design,
education, biological, physical and
social sciences, law, and music.
In order to provide for expanded
facilities and form a pedestrian
campus, with a ten minute walk-
ing interval between buildings, the
Wargelin-Telfer Plan moves traffic'
to the outer boundaries of the
campus area with vehicular pene-
tration only by loops at critical
points serving parking facilities,
building service, and campus en-
trances.

--DavidGilitrow
INTERMEZZO-Bargain Days shoppers, summer session students, and other Ann Arbor residents took
advantage last night of one of the musical interludes of summer in Ann Arbor-a Diag band concert-
as a welcome and cooling diversion.
FORD FOUNDATION PROJECT:
Professors Add to Humanities Study

I

A national Ford Foundation pro-
ject on improving the studdy and
teaching of humanities will in-
clude critical writings by two Uni-
vezsity professors.
Analyses ofsrecent scholarship
in ethics and social philosophy will
be contributed by Prof. Wiliam K.
Frankena, chairman of the- philos-
ophy department.
Prof. John E. Higham of the
history department is writing a
critical evaluation of studies in
history since 1930.

Prof. Gerald F. Else, chairman
of the department of classical
studies, was a member of the pro-
ject's original committee, which
mapped the goals and procedures
of the study in 1958.
A Ford Foundation grant of
$335,000.subsidizes the study, which
is administered by Princeton Uni-
versity's Council of the Humani-
ties. The director of the project is
lProf. Richard Schlatter, chairman

of the history department at Rut-
gers University.
The humanist scholars' general
task, Prof. Schlatter says, "is to
organize our huge inheritance of
culture, to make the past avialable
to men, to judge, as a critic, the
actions of the present by the
experience of the past."
How Will
Analyses of scholarship in phi-
losophy, history, literature, classi-
cal studies, art and religion will
determine how well the task is
being accomplished. Other out-
standing scholars will prepare
short books on their subjects.
The study seems to broaden
the scholar's outlook beyond his
own specialty and any current
"dominant movement" of thought.
Its results should also be of hel:
to University administrators con-
cerned with curriculasdevelop-
ment, Prof. Frankena asserted.
The separate studies may be
combined in a one-volume critical
history of American scholarship ir
the humanities since 1930.
to the Stars," following which the
fifth floor observatory will be oper
for observation of Jupiter, Saturn,
the Double Star and Hercules
cluster. The lecture will begin at
8pin, in Rm. 2003, Angell Hall,

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Housing Expansion
To the southeast, in an ear
which is presently residential, a
renewal project was proposed to
provide the sorority and fraternity
housing necessitated by expansion
of the University.
The Wargelin-Telfer design is,
intended to solve the frictions
caused by random growth of both1
the University and the city.
Sources of friction include traffic
congestion, lack of adequate park-
ing facilities, depreciation in real
estate surrounding the campus,
and business relationships.

PROJECTED VIEW-Ann Arbo
Imagined it-c. 1985-is constru
graduate students, and is on disc
ture & Design Sehool.
The new project now on exhibit
stems from the proposals of the
Wargelin-Telfer study, and puts
the earlier plan's varied begin-
nings into a conceivable spatial
order.
Michigan 1985
It is a projection to 1985, vis-
ualizing the central campus as a
fully self-contained urban com-
plex in the sense that it is at once
an academic society, a cultural
and conference center, a recrea-
tion area, a residential area com-
plete with shopping centers, and a
provider of attractive open space.

on the east, and Catherine on the
north with penetration loops at
Division and Thayer.
Due to obsolescence, deteriora-
tion, or failure to fit into the de-
// sign concept for this central area,
all of the existing buildings except
f~ Angell-Mason-Haven Hall, the Un-
1 dergraduate Library, East Engi-
/4.%"Yneering, East Medical, the Church
Street parking structure and the
$3<museum on Washtenaw woul be
torn down.
f:Libraries Central
The dominant type of unit in
the central core area would be the
library complex. The western half
of the original campus block would
* 4 ,be devoted to classroom buildings
$ <4for LS&A and the social sciences.
GRAD STUDENT C
y~G" fy- Yf . SO CIA L
5-7...each
F, VFW
314 Eas
everyone must
-David Giltrow
r as George Orwell might have
icted as a model by architecture
play in the lobby of the Architec-
At the same time, it is inte- sc
grated with the community
through the sharing of its cul-
tural, business, and open areas,
and its strong linkage with the
athletic and medical campuses. _---
Among, the proposals included
in the plan is a monorail con-
necting the central and north TO N
campuses.
By cutting down commutation o
time between the campuses, the
designers hope that the north
campus will be able to operate at
maximum capacity and slowly be-
come the upper class and graduateO
cented of a larger hierarchy of
undergraduate centers.
Parking-Plans Final performanc
Parking garages are also in-
cluded in the plan because of the
tremendous amount of surface area
required by faculty cars alone. The
garages would be designed for easy
conversion when new modes of
transportation become the vogue.
According to the new plan the
central campus area would be
bounded by Division and Geddes
on the north, Cambridge-Oakland
on the south, Oxford and Forest
«L
1 P
.GOLF RANGE
On U. -23 - South Of Packard R
S
s CAFE
PROMETHEAN :00 . Lydia
508 E. William
t. Box ofcelerp
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
r Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs Next week: Wil
(50c door charge)
. .
Sundy-JAZZ-9-12 p.m. prize-winning d
f (75c door charge)
Open daily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

D PS

CLUB
t Liberty
be' 21 or over

Classroom buildings on
northeast corner of the ori
block would be devoted to bio:
cal sciences, and the classrc
on the southeast corner to
physical sciences.
The two proposed parking at
tures are grouped around the e:
ing parking structure on Ch
Street.
Long Axis
The University's Research I
tute would be located at the
end of a long axis beginnin
the Diag.
Since its function is diffe
from the functions of the c
buildings in the original
block, it was thought advisab
separate it from them.
COUNCIL Presents
HOUR
Friday in July

--CAMPUS-
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
--DOWNTOWN-
205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

... .

1

IGHT
nd

V

)W NIGHT
Myv

t,,.

1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

-II

es of
-ia kespea re's

-11

r IMIY I I I M - '

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/Icro44 Campui

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(Continued from Page 2)
ods. Prefer 1 to 3 yrs. successful work
experience in consumer marketing
Fleld.
Pennsalt Chemicals Corp. Safety En-
gineer for Wyandotte, Mich. works.
ChE, ME or Indunstrial Eng. with 3 to
6 yrs. experience, preferably in chemi-
cals plant.
American Steel Foundries. Chicago.
Opening in Patent Dept, for engineer-
ing grad. desiring to enter field of
patent law. Degree in ME or EE pre-
ferred.
Bausch & Lomb, Inc., New York.
Electronics Engineers, Operational En-
gineer, Senior Design Engineer.
Chicago Rawhide Mfg. Co., Detroit
plant. Plant Engineer, M.E.
City of Flint, 'Mich, Assistant Lab-'
oratory Director, M.B. in bacteriology,
physiological or biological chem,
American - Standard Plumbing and
Heating Division. Grad engineer for
i Gas Engineering unit. Experience not
necessary.

"1

NOW

..
I

DIAL
NO 2-6264

The University School of Music
and Summer Session will sponsor
the 12th Annual National Band
Conductor's Conference from 8:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. today in the
Union Ballroom with registration
at 8 a.m.
9 * 9
Tonight is visitor's night in the'
astronomy department. Dr. Ken-
neth M. Yoss of Mt. Holyoke Col-

Cadillac Motor Car Co., Detroit.
6 accounting trainees leading to
tions in various departments.
with some accounting.

Need
post-
Man,

lege will lecture on-

"The Distances

I

Allied Advertising Agency, Boston.
Men for marketing and sales in the
computer industry. Man with Bus. Ad.
degree.
SUMMIER PLACEMENT
Inland Wiaterway Guide, Magazine,
needs solicitor of advertising, local
rep. for Great Lakes area. Man.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1960-61
school year.
Ann Arbor, Mich. (Washtenaw Co
S chs.)--Speech Correction.
Bloomfild Hills, Mich. (Kingswood
Sch.)-HS Chem/Physics/Gen Sd. with
some math if possible.
Clinton, Mich.-Guidance Counselor
Corinth, New York (Central 8ch
Dist.)-,r. HS Math/Sci.; HS Girl
Phys. Ed.
East Detroit, Mich.-HS English, Eng/
Latin or Soc. Stud./Latin; Jr. HS
Math.
Grosse Pointe, Mich.-Speech Correc-
tionist.
Harvey, i.-Speech Correctionist.
Hillsdale, Mich.-HS Gen. Shop (me-
tals/wood/au to).
Inkster, Mich.-Speech Correctionist
Visiting Teacher; Elementary.
Kalamazoo, Mich.-Elementary, Phys
Ed., Art Cons.; Jr. HS Math/Eng o
Sci., Eng/Typing or Soc. Stud., Ind
Arts/Math, Girls Phys. Ed., Math/Soc
Stud. or just Math, Home Ec/Health
soc. Stud., Eng/For. Lang.; HS Eng
French, Eng., Chem/Phys. Sci., Print.
ing/Woodshop, Consumer Math; Spec
Educ.: Perceptually Disturbed, Ortho
HEdcp., Physical Therapist, Visually im-
paired, Speech Corr., Diagnosticians
Ment. Hdcp.
Manton, Mich.--HS Chem/Gen. Set/
perhaps 9th grade Math.
Monroe, Mich.-HS English.
Montrose, Mich.-7th Grade English/
Speech.
Newhall, Calif.-7th & 8th Or. basic
Eng., Reading, Spelling, Penmanship
History and Geography; Math.
Petersburg, Mich.-Speech Correction.
ist.
For any additional information con
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.

F

.S

I'

i

,

Mendelssohn Theatre
$1.25

'I

IKE,

I

I

Starting
TODAY

"The Best Live-Actor Movie
Disney Has Ever Made...
A Production That Is
Approximately Perfect!"
-TIME MAGAZINE

I

~A great show
for adults
too!"
-Review

DIAL
NO 5-6290
4 Shows
Doily at
1:00
3:30
6:10
8:45

hiam Inge's Pulitzer
-ram, "PICNIC."
-Dept. of Speech

n from 10 A.M.

I

I

I

r

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"GOING TO CONQUER EVERYBODY!"
-LOOK MAGAZINE

/

04

I

- i

I

I

{
C

CA (
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
CITIZEN KANE
(1941)
"One of the twelve best films of all time"
-Brussels Critics Poll
With Orson \A/eIs Iosenh Cotton.

... and your enjoyment
will never be greater...
as a delightful cast and
a dazzling new star
bring you one of the
great entertainments
of all time... an event
for everyone.

CONTINUING THOSE
Baugami
EXTRA SPECI
For Today at

DIAL NO 8-6416
"1A GNINCENT!"
. Bosley C..wthe Y'imes
hin b Technicolor
'* and '
Jerome K. JEROME'S Classic Comedy

ii Days

I

LE-

IAL VALUES
nd Saturday

- ..v._.. :.4: :4x25::

V.
G
0

It's your chance to choose from high quality wearables-
all from our own regular stock of Spring and Summer
suits - All wool coats - huge group of better dresses of
every kind including dark fall types -better jewelry -
all handbgs-a wide choice of jewelry at .

I

;,;; - I - -- I

C

F

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