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June 21, 1960 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-06-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__________________THE MICHIGAN DAILY

as Qualifies for Olympic Trials,,
mes Lone Wolverine on U.S. Team

Cannon

SEVEN STROKES DOWN:
Palmer Wins Open in Uphill Battle Against Hog

By The Associated Press
,rsatile Dick Cephas was the
Michigan Wolverine qualified
next week's U.S. Olympic
Ak Trials in the wake of NCAA
npionship competition.
he fifth-place finisher in the
meter hurdles, Cephas will be
Ong those seeking an Olympic
1 berth during the July 1-2
s at Palo Alto.
State Places More
ichigan's other NCAA point
iers, sprinter Tom Robinson
finished fifth in both dashes,

and Jumper Lea Bird, whose 24
foot 111/2 inch leap was good for
fourth place, are expected to be
Olympic Games competitors for
their native Bahamas and Jamaica
respectively, however. -
Other state of Michigan colle-
gians to place in the Nationals are
Eastern's Mauri Jormakka, third
in the 3000-meter steeplechase;
Central's Dave Myers, fourth in
the 400-meter dash, and Michigan
State's Solomon Akpata, sixth in
the hop-step-jump. Western's Jer-

ry Ashmore qualified in the 5000-
meter run.
America's collegiate track and
field coaches had their buttons
popping today after one of the
greatest NCAA Championship
meets ever held.
Ten meet records were shattered
Saturday as Kansas' powerful Jay-
hawks thundered to their second
straight NCAA title.
But it wasn't Just the Kansans
who delighted 13,750 track fans
at the University of California's
Edwards Stadium.
Top Six Qualify
The top six Americans in -ach
event qualified for the U.S. Olym-
pic team trials at Stanford, July
1-2.
The only double winner was
Kansas's Charlie Tidwell, a great
sprinter who captured the 200-
meter dash in 20.8 seconds and
retained his 100-meter crown with
a meet record-equalling :10.2.
The loudest ovation of the
thrill-packed afternoon went to
lanky John Thomas of Boston
University when he eased over the
bar at 7 feet for a new meet
record in the high jump. It was
the 28th time he has gone 7 feet
this year.V
Kansas Wins Meet
Kansas piled up 50 points-
well off the 73 it compiled to win
the championship a year ago but
solidly ahead of Southern Cali-
fornia, second Saturday with 37.
In addition to the 100-meter
mark tied by Tidwell and the new
standards set by Thomas and
Alley, the star-studded field added
eight new NCAA meet marks.
Two of the bigger records broken
were in javelin and shot put. Bill
Alley of Kansas threw his Javelin
a distance of 264 feet, 2 inches.
Southern California's Dallas Long
put the shot 61 feet 9 inches. Both
were the longest distances re-
corded in NCAA track and field
history. Records were also broken
in the hammer throw, hop, skip,
and jump and several meter runs
and dashes.
NL Attendance
Nearing Peak
Attendance n the Nat i o n al
League baseball parks, at least,
is on the upswing and will prob-
ably establish a new record of
more than 10 million "senior cir-
cuit."
Dave Grote, manager of the
National League's service bureau,
said that at mid-June attendance
was about half a million ahead of
last year's pace when 9,994,525
fans viewed the eight teams.
Grote estimated that attendance
has increased at a rate almost
four times that of the U.S. popu-
lation.
Since 1901, 283,659,720 people
have witnessed National League
teams in action, Grote claimed.

.Triump hs
In Court
LOS ANGELES (P)-Al Ameri-
ca halfback Billy Cannon won a
sweeping court victory over the
Los Angeles Rams yesterday that
enables him to fulfill a fabulous
$110,000 contract with the Hous-
ton Oilers.
Federal Judge William J. Lind-
berg, by ruling that neither of two
Ram contracts with Cannon is
valid, handed the fledgling Amer-
ican Football League a win in the
first of several tests coming up in
its player war with the long-
established National Football
League.
Blasts Roelle
He also blasted NFL Comnis-
sioner 'Pete Rozelle, who signed
Cannon for the Rams.
Cannon, 22-year-old ex-Louis-
iana State University star, thus is
free to play under his three-year
deal with K.S. (Bud) Adams Jr.,
owner of the Oilers.
Cannon was the most sought-
after footballer in the country
last year. The Rams signed him
first but Cannon later signed with
the Oilers and said he'd play only
for them.
Verdict Pleases Cannon
Today's key ruling was on an
injunction suit filed by the Rams
to prevent Cannon from playing
with anyone else.
Cannon heard the verdict with
no show of emotion. His attorney
later quoted him as saying he is
"very happy to prevail in this
case and it was apparent the
judge considered the law and the
facts and came up with the prop-
er decision."
Ram president Dan Reeves said
he was shocked. He defended
commissioner Rozeile, Ram gen-
eral manager when Cannon was
signed, as "the most honest man
in the world."
'Shroud Of Secrecy'
Judge Lindberg critized Ro-
zelle's handling of negotiations.
He said it was hard to resolve the
issues in the case because of a
"shroud of secrecy" over Rozelle's
operations. He called Cannon "ex-
ceptionally naive . . . a provincial
lad untutored and unwise in the
ways of the business world." He
said Rozelle rushed him into sign-
ing last Nov. 30 within 48 hours
after first contacting him on the
telephone.
It appeared it was the moral
aspects surrounding this deal that
swayed the court in ruling it
merely an offer and not a binding
document.
Judge Lindberg said that Can-
non did not have the benefit of
advice of anyone other than Ro-
zelle in their head-to-head 45-
minute signing session in Rozelle's
hotel room in Philadelphia.
The two clubs have been warring
in court over Cannon's services.
Each claim it had a valid contract
with him.
Federal Judge William J. Lind-
berg said of Cannon, former Loui-
siana State University star: "Not
withstanding his prowess and
ability on the gridiron, he is not
an astute businessman."
He said Cannon impressed him
as "exceptionally naive for a col-
lege senior" and a "provincial lad
untutored and unwise in the ways
of the business world."

DENVER (') -- Arnold Palmer
came from seven strokes off the
pace with a 6-under-par 65 fourth
round Saturday and won the Na-
tional Open golf title as Ben Ho-
gan faltered on the final two
holes in quest of his coveted and
unprecedented fifth champion-
ship.
Jack Nicklaus, the amaetur
champion from Columbus, o.,
grabbed second place with a final
round 71 for a 282 total. He
knocked in an eagle 3 on the 538-
yard fifth, which he reached with
two irons and took over the tem-
porary lead at the 63rd hole.
Then he began three-putting.

His runner-up position is the best
by an amateur in the Open since
Johnny Goodman won it in 1933.
His score of 282 was the lowest
ever for an amateur.
Burns Up Course
Never before in the 60-year his-
tory of the Open had a man made
up more than five strokes in the
final round. But Palmer flamed
his way around the seared 7,004
yards of the Cherry Hills Country
Club for a total of 280 that
brought him the title to go with
the Masters crown he won in
April.
Palmer, who meets a challenge

as an old friend, started the 36-
hole windup eight strokes behind
Mike Souchak and in a tie for
fifteenth place. A one-over par
72 in the morning's third round
gave no indication of the fire-1
works ahead.
Hogan Fails At Traps
After lunch he tore through the
first nine of the final round in
30 strokes, tying the open record.
He tallied six birdies, two pars
and a bogey. Coming home he,
stayed closer to par as the hard-
ened fairways and greens of the
35-36-71 layout alternately lifted

and dropped the chances c
others.
Hogan, grim and deteri
was even with Palmer unt
final two holes. There
Hawk" became the victim
two water hazards. On the
teenth he put, his second she
the mud near the moat.
knocking the ball on the
with still a chance for a y
missed a 10-footer
On the eighteenth, Hoga
lapsed to a three-over-par I
he drove into the lake an
encountered the rough and
before reaching the green.

sportswear
for sportsmell
the new length
in swim trunks
The Hawaiian ... a square-
leg trunk reaching to a
midway lengtha.e.. is
preferred by basketball pro
Bob Cousy, because it gives
him that trim appearance
and is rugged enough for
the most active swimming.

ARNOLD PALMER
... blazing victory

INJUREI-Jim Moreland of Brown University bows his head at
next to the last hurdle and does not complete the race. He had
inJured his knee on the previous hurdle in second heat of the
NCAA 404-meter semi-finals.

600

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