100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 17, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDA ft JULY 17,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WAEf Wu~w5 11 £5LZ

.USDY JL 1,192 H MCIGNDA1

rA(in ints

AID TO EDUCATION:
Hook Cites National Efforts

By JOHN CONLEY
math, and foreign languages,
The United States Office of which all received federal funds in
Education is NOT interested in a the nost-Snutnik fervor to im-

national curriculum. It does NOT
want to control education. It
DOES want to cooperate in raising
school standards and urgently
hopes that Congress will make
more money available to strength-
en English studies.
That was the message that J. N.
Hook, coordinator of "Project
English" in the United States Of-
tlce of Education brought to yes-
terday's session of the Conference
Series for Teachers of English.
A winner of the Hatfield award
for long and distinguished service
to his profession, Hook was for-
merly a professor of English at
the University of Illinois and, from
1953-1960, executive secretary of
the National Council of the Teach-
ers of English. He has written The
Teaching of High School English
and texts on grammar and usage.
Pleas Answered
Hook described "Project Eng-
lish' as an outgrowth of repeated
pleas since 1958 by the Council of
English Teachers that their field
be supported, along with science,
Pollock To Speakr
On Con-Con Action
Prof. James A. Pollock, of the
political science department and
delegate to the constitutional con-
vention will speak on "An Analysis
of Convention Action" at 4:15 p.m.
today in Aud. A. The lecture is
one in a series on "The Michigan
Constitutional Convention" under
the auspices of the Summer Ses-
sion.

..., r....., . .,..r. ,.... . : .., ...
---. ..i_ _s

i

prove the nation's educational
product.
The pleas were heeded a year
ago to the tune of $500,000 to aid
English instruction in the U.S.
Hook became the project's coor-
dinator last February.
The veteran educator described
how the money is being spent: sev-
eral high-school-curriculum study
centers are in action; programs
are being planned for the cultur-
ally deprived; support is to go to
studies in structural linguistics;
research is under way for building
writing skills in secondary schools.
Special Projects
Hook also pointed to research
studies from Florida to Washing-
ton dealing with matters such as
teaching English to the deaf and
blind, improving the English of
those in backward or special-dia-
lect areas of the country, and as-
sessing procedures in teaching
composition.
Prof. Hook said that nothing
more dramatically illustrates the
vital need for better English than
the fact, as he asserted, that half,
of what you pay for every car
goes for words. Pay $3,000: $1,500
goes for words! Half of every tax
dollar also goes for words, he said.
Agency Sympathetic
Citing his agency as one sym-
pathetic to the goals of the teach-
ing of English, Hook says the so-
called "Quality Education" bill.
now pending in Congress may
pass. With it would go an imme-
diate $24,000,000 to give support
all across the country to such in-
stitutes in the teaching of English
as are being conducted at Ann Ar-

bor and elsewhere this summer but
under private auspices. Increased
annual support would follow, if
the bill is adopted.
In the question period Hook re-
asserted the opposition of the Of-
fice of Education to any kind of
national curriculum. "It's counter
to the whole American tradition,"
he said, "which stands firmly for
local control of schools."
Sponsor Talks
On Humanities
The School of Education is
sponsoring the 33rd Summer Edu-
cation Conference this week. The
theme for the conference is "The
Humanities in an Age of Science."
Prof. Arnold Kaufman of the
philosophy department will speak
on "The Place of Philosophy in an
Age of Science" at 9 a.m. today in
Schorling Aud. in the University
High School. In addition, Prof.
Wesley Maurer, Chairman of Jour-
nalism department, will speak on
"The Democracy of Learning" at
11 a.m. today.
On Wednesday the conference
will continue with a talk by Prof.
John Bowditch, Chairman of the
history department, on "The Role
of thebHistorian" at 9a.m. fol-
lowed by a talk by Prof. Marvin
Felheim of the English depart-
ment on "The Contributions of
Literature," at 11 a.m.
The Midwest Community Col-
lege Leadership Program is cur-
rently being sponsored by the Uni-
versity, Michigan State Univer-
sity, and Wayne State University.
The theme is "The Administra-
tive Process."
Speeches and panel discussions
by college administrators will be
held daily through Friday. All ses-
sions will take place at the Rack-
ham Building.
William G. Shannon, assistant
executive director of the American
Association of Junior Colleges will
give a report on Junior College
Presidency at 1 p.m. today.

YR's Motion
Hits Stahlin
For Attack~s
The Michigan Federation of
Young Republican Clubs rapped
lieutenant gubernatorial candi-
date Sen. John Stahlin (R-Beld-
ing) for his attack on 14th District
GOP Chairman William Durant
and mapped strategy for the fall
campaign at a meeting in St. Clair
Sunday.
A resolution attacked Stahlin's
charges about Durant's alleged
extreme right-wing views and his
attack on several conservative YR
members, federation president
Steven Stockmever, '63, said.
The resolution had first come up
at the board's June meeting, he
explained. However, it was delayed
at that time and a milder resolu-
tion was introduced and passed
Sunday, Stockmeyer said.
Cites Resolution
"The June resolution was a 'we
like Durant' resolution. The sec-
ond one said 'we don't like Stah-
lin's action'," he explained.
An expected motion in defense
of Stahlin by Albion YR chairman
Kinball Smith was never intro-
duced, Stockmeyer noted.
The meeting outlined three
plans for the fall campaign. It set
up a "first voter drive" in which
campus YR groups would encour-
age registration and supply forms
for students eligibleto vote.
The YR's also set up "task
forces" to work in areas "where
the Republican organization is
weak," Stockmeyer noted. The
forces, recruited from the various
YR clubs would canvas neighbor-
hoods on weekends to aid the Re-
publican organization.
Past Methods
He said that such forces had
been used in past campaigns, but
never as extensively as planned for
this fall.
The plan was a drive to estab-
lish a YR chapter at every univer-
sity, college and junior college in
the state. The club currently has
28 chapters in the state and
Stockmeyer estimated that, seven
or eight more could be established
if all the junior colleges were cov-
ered.

Creating a center of inner calm
is a major challenge to today's'
music teachers, Karl Haas, direc-
tor of fine arts, WJR, Detroit, said
yesterday at a general session of3
the 33rd annual Summer Educa-
tion Conference, "The Humanities
in the Age of Science."
"This isn't easy because in this1
technological age we are all bom-t
barded by stresses that take from
us that extra supply of adrenaline.
"We must face this challenget
first in our own lives before we1
transmit to those in our charge.1
Then it will be within our powert
to imbue young minds with the
ability to strike the right balancet
between the sciences and the hu-
manities," Haas said.,
Sees Growtht
Haas said he believes America
is growing on the creative musical
scene. "Across the country we are
employing composers in residence.
They don't have to worry where
their next meal is coming from.'
Haas deplored the increasing
use of music as background "while
r"Technological
Achievement
Hides Values
"The dazzling achievements of
science tend to blind us to the
other values of life," Prof. Carle-
ton Washburne of the Michigan
State University education school,
said here yesterday.
He spoke at the opening general
session at the 33rd annual Sum-
mer Education Conference on
"The Humanities in an Age of
Science."
"Applied science has given man
a technology for satisfying a mul-
titude of desires, bad and good,
trivial and sublime, lethal and hu-
mane. It has added immeasurably
to man's comfort and freedom
from drudgery," said Washburne.
"But it has given power to crim-
inals and degenerates as well as
to men of good will. It has given
man power to save lives, but also
to exterminate whole populations,"
he continued.
"Science does not determine
goals, ideals and values. It is ap-
plied to means, not ends. It is
limited to those aspects of knowl-
edge that can be found through
analysis, measurement, and con-
trolled experiment."
"The really great scientist is
aware of the limitations of sciene.
He knows how small a fraction of
man's aspirations can be satisfied
by science alone," he said.

we do the darnedest things. You
can walk through the aisles of a
supermarket today and listen to
Brahms' second Symphony. Per-
sonally I resent this," Haas said.
"And I think Mr. Brahms would
too. His music was meant to be
listened to with complete concen-
tration."
Too Accustomed
The danger as Haas sees it is
that we may become so accus-
tomed to this kind of subconscious
listening that we get bored going
to a concert.
"We're so spoiled that if we go
to a concert and hear the first
French horn 'fluff', we suffer as
if we had studied music since the
beginning of our thinking career.
"Personally I think one of the
finest freedoms we have is the
right to be wrong. How wonder-
ful it is to hear an artist make a
booboo! It proves we aren't ma-
chines!" Haas concluded.

MUSIC TEACHING:
Haas Sees Difficulties
In Crseating inner Calm

EXPLODING
TOMORROW
8:00 P.M., TRUEBLOOD AUD., FRIEZE BLDG.
Uiversit
PlayerN

I '1

©lAt iil ii i uuuu, l
N .ilh N { .
2-6264 Mills
Ifrm , n ,,, u ,, illlll111111
1

Shows start
at 1:10 - 3:40
6:15 & 9:00

SALE!
/
Long and Short Sleeve
formerly .5.98 to 6.98
NOW
uTriumph Over Tradition"
1209 South University
Open Monday till 8:30 P.M.

I.

I

I

I

THE
SENSATIONAL
HIT
THAT'S
RAISING
THE
ROOF I
"An absorbing and skillf u
screen story."
-LouisCook,
Detroit Free Press
"Powerful adult drama."
-Al Weitschat,
Detroit News

PRESENT
UGO BETTI'S

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

DARK
TOW

(Continued from Page 2)
Mr. Jouko Vihtori Makela, Chief of
the Vocational Guidance Bureau for
the District of Oulu; Teacher of Voca-
tional Guidance at the TeachersCollege
of the University of Oulu, Finland, July
15-18.
Mr. Abdul Aziz Suitani, Student at
Teachers College, Columbia University;
Afghanistan; July 19-22.
Events
Opening Tomorrow Night:, Ugo Betti's
exciting drama, "Queen and the Reb-
els," 8:00 p.m. through Sat. night at
Trueblood Aud., Frieze Bldg. Tickets
$1.50, $1.00 for tomorrow and Thurs.;
$1.75, $1.25 for Fri. and Sat. Box office
ipen today 10-5, 10-8 rest of week.
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Prof. Her-
bert Penzl will discuss "Historical and
Descriptive Linguistics: Two Disciplines
or One?" on Tues., July 17 at 7:30 p.m.
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Stanley Quartet: The Stanley Quartet,
Gilbert Ross, violin, Gustave Rosseels,
violin, Robert Courte, viola, and Jerome
Jelinek, cello, will present a second
summer recital on Tues, July 17, 8:30
p.m. in Rackham Lecture Hall. They
will be performing the works of Moz-
art, Webern, and Brahms. Their third
and final performance of the summer
series will be on Tues., July 31. Open
to the public without- charge.
Lecture, Wed., July 18, Kenneth Ken-
iston, lecturer in Social Relations,
Harvard Univ., will speak on "American
Youth and Politics" in Aud. A, Angell
Hall, at 4:10 p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
George Fry and Assoc., N.Y.C.-Mgmt.
Consultants seeking exper., technical
men, age 26-39. for client firms in
chemical industry: Div. Director and
Analytical Chemist, M.S. or PhD pre-
ferred, industrial photographic solu-
tions. Polymerization Chemist; pilot
plant supervision. Adhesive Sales Engrg.
for New Jersey with exper. in R. and D.,
technical service and indirect selling.
Automobile Industry - Personnel
Trainee to work in all phases of per-
sonnel. Recent college grad., male. No
exper. needed. Immed. opening for
outstanding graduate.
Rohm & Hass Co., Philadelphia, Pa.-
Analytical Chemists (radiochemistry);
Chemical Sales; Chemical Engnrs. for

For further information, please
General Div., Bureau of Appts.,;
SAB, Ext. 3544.

Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, at
NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Student to walk with another man.
Once in the morning and once
again in the early afternoon. Will
equal 1 hour per day. He is a lawyer,
so would prefer someone in law
school.
1-To sell fresh frozen crickets. Would
need a car. Full-time for 2 months.
1-Student in Psychology or Special
Education, between the age of 20
and 25, to act as companion to a 20-
year-old boy. Full time for 11a~
months. Must live in.
FEMALE
1-To cook for one person and live in.
Bus runs by house.
1-To baby sit and do light house-
keeping. Three children, ages 3
months, 3 years and 4 years. Full-
time for three weeks and part-time
for approximately three more weeks.
Hours would be from 7:30 a.m. to 7
p.m.
1-With W.S.I. to give swimming les-
sons to an intermediate swimmer.
Several part time permanent secre-
taries or clerk-typists.

Dial ~ lllII l C-o-o-L
Diintiiiwi i

ENDING
WEDNESDAY

domestic sales and mfg., M. Engnrs.
Product Dev, and Design.
Local Retail Store-Young woman for
Cosmetics Dept. College grads. with
extensive retailing exper. plus knowl-
edge or training as Cosmetologist.
Permanent position.

"JEAN SOREL.
IS THE
HANDSOMEST
OF LOVERS, YA
AND ALL
HS
VICTIMS oml Pe
ARE ("EFrom A Roman Bakcony")
GRATEFUL'1"A tELLE MSS
-.NEW YORKER MAGAI NE ;M oE.LAMW~
Sand "WEE GORDI E"

call
3200

J.eaiort

by
This
Gothic Print Cotton
has a talent for going
into Autumn
with a cool outlook!
PRACTICAL,
PRETTY,
WASHABLE
$1098

:w
, '
1
3 .
: ' s
:, :
r'''
c

uu
N

1

"OPERATIC MUSIC LOVERS"
Clip this out and save for quick reference. Here is your opportunity to
see famous musical classics acclaimed the world over. These are the
beloved musicals you have been waiting to see. Six musical greats. Shown
only on a one day policy. One per week for the next six weeks.
JULY 19 - NELSON EDDY "THE CHOCOLATE SOLDIER"
JULY 26 - HOWARD KEEL "ROSE MARIE"
AUG. 2 - JEANETTE MacDONALD "THE MERRY WIDOW"
AUG. 9 - "THE GIRL OF THE GOLDEN WEST"
AUG. 16 -"THE GREAT WALTZ"
AUG. 23 - "SWEETHEARTS"
-

ait

the

I

REBELS

ummner

9e4 tial

I

Sizes 10-18
others 7-15

14 to 20
10-44

12 to 24V2
from 10.98 to 29.98

F21
J
off c

Just one of

I

new dark
cottons we
for you

many
tone
have

OF FRENCH FILMS
Four award-winning French films with English subtitles: Wednesdays at
7:30 P.M. in the Multipurpose Room of the Undergraduate Library.
Wednesday, July 18:
GATES OF PARIS

i

I

I

I

I

(Portes des Lilas),

1957.

FOREST
aorer of S.

Wednesday, July 25:
THE RED AND THE BLACK

University opposite
Campus Theatre
in the South U.
Shopping Area

(Le rouge et le noir) ,

1954.

Wednesday, August 8:
f"If"% AIC CI"C A AEMCI

" . 1

g i m

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan