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June 26, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-06-26

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Y, JUNE 26,1962

THE MICHIGAN Tb A ILLY

P)

1 JUNE 26, 1962 THE MICHIGAN ~IAWLY

r

CJ

Canada

Sets

Belt- Tightening

Rusk, Home Discuss Policies,
See Communist Difficulties

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Supreme

Court

Decision'

Hits Prayer Requirement

Last. Minute
zMajor Ruling
Finds Critics
I
WASHINGTON (MP-A New York
state education official expressed
disappointment yesterday at the
United States Supreme Court de-
cision outlawing prayer in public
schools while a Jewish leader said
y he was "highly gratified."
Comment from Congress was
generally critical with southern-
ers denouncing the decision in
caustic terms. .
Leo Pfeffer, general counsel of
the American Jewish Congress,
said in New York that the Supreme
Court edict "makes it clear that
federal funds may not be used to
finance parochial school educa-
tion."
'Shocked, Frightened'
However, Francis Cardinal Spell-
man said he was "shocked and
frightened" at the decision. He
described the prayer as a "simple
and voluntary declaration of be-
lief in God by public school chil-
dren."
Cardinal Spellman said, "the de-
cision strikes at the very heart of
the godly tradition in which
America's children have for so
long been raised."
Chancellor Edgar W. Couper of
the Board of Regents of New York,
w the educational ruling body in the
state, said:
Accept Ruling
"It is a disappointment because
we believed in this thing ... but
the Supreme Court has ruled and
we accept it with regret."
In Albany, a spokesman for the
New York State Education De-
partment said, "we are disappoint-
ed in the decision but will accept
it as law-because that's what it
is.
Southern lawmakers, who have
criticized the high court for years
for its stands on racial matters,
were quick to react to the prayer
decision.
"They put the Negroes in the
schools and now they've driven
God out of them," said Rep.
George Andrews (D-Ala).
"The next thing you know,
they'll be telling us we can't open
our daily House sessions with
prayer, Rep. Howard W. Smith (D-
Va) said.

FEARS-Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black and Francis Cardinal
Spellman expressed fears in discussing the various issues of the
Supreme Court decision banning prayers in public schools. Black
feared for religious freedom while Spellman was concerned with
religious belief..
WALKOUT THREAT:
Senators Seek Means
To Halt Airline Strikes
WASHINGTON (M)-Faced with a deadlock in the tangled airline
labor situation, some Senators began talking yesterday of seeking
new laws to cope with the problem.
A strike already has grounded Eastern Air Lines and Pan
American World Airways is threatened with a shutdown today.
Secretary of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg reported Pan American
negotiations were "still deadlocked," and the talks were recessed to

t}
Black Fears
GovVernment
Involvement
Rigid Church-State
Separation Demanded
WASHINGTON (P) - The Su-
preme Court declared yesterday
the Constitution is violated by any
requirement that a public school
teacher lead her pupils in prayer.
"It is no part of the business of
government to compose official
prayers for any group of American
people to recite as part of a reli-
gious program carried on by gov-
ernment," Justice Hugo L. Black
said in delivering the 6-1 decision.
It doesn't matter that the pray-
er is denominationally neutral,
Black said, or that it is voluntary
for the students to recite it.
Power, Belief
"When the power, prestige and
financial support of government is
placed behind a particular religious
belief," he declared, "the indirect
coercive pressure upon religious
minorities to conform to the pre-
vailing officially approved religion
is plain."
Black read the 15-page opinion
in quiet tones to a more-than-
usually hushed audience jammed
with tourists on the wind-up day
of the 1961-62 court term. The
justices are not scheduled to meet
again until Oct. 1.
Justices Felix Frankfurter and
Byron R. White took, no part in
the school prayer ruling, the most
momentous pronouncement on the
doctrine of separation of church
and state in many years.
Two Rulings
It follows two separate rulings
that while religious instruction
cannot be conducted on publio
school property, pupils may be re-
leased during school hours for
such instruction elsewhere. Earlier,
the court upheld reimbursement
of parents for expenses of bus
transportation to parochial as
well as public schools.
Specifically yesterday's ruling
invalidated a New York Board of
Regents recommendation calling
for the recital of a 22-word prayer
at the start of each school day.

Diefenbaker
Ups Tariff,
Gains Loan
Move 'Temporary;'
Country Said Sound
OTTAWA, Can. (AP) - Canada
yesterday began a belt-tightening
emergency austerity regime of
widespread tariff increases and
government economy ordered by
Prime Minister John Diefenbaker
to bolster the Canadian dollar.
Diefenbaker, whose Progressive
Conservative party was badly
weakened in the general election
last week, called on Canadians to
support the new measures "in a
spirit of national purpose." He said
Canada's economy is fundamen-
tally strong and sound.
He announced the program on
Sunday to avoid market upheavals
and emphasized that the measures
would be temporary.
The prime minister said Canada
has obtained more than $1 billion
in short term financial aid to
strengthen the nation's dwindling
foreign exchange reserves until the
other government measures have
their effect. Two-thirds of these
loans and credits were made avail-
able by the United States.
He said the government is de-
termined to defend the dollar's
exchange rate at the recently de-
valued level of 92%/2 United States
cents.
In a related step, the Bank of
Canada hiked its interest rate to
six perdcent, a move apparently
designed to retain capital that
recently has been going abroad for
investment. The fluctuating rate
was 5.17 Per cent last week and
4.18 per cent the week before.

Seek Soviet Talks
At Geneva Confab
By The Associated Press
LONDON - Secretary of State
Dean Rusk and British Foreign
Secretary Lord Home aligned poli-
cies on various areas from Berlin
to the Chinese offshore islands
while hoping that Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko will
join them in an informal foreign
ministers meeting in Geneva.
The two are reported to have
agreed that the Communists are
on the defensive because of in-
ternal food and economic prob-'
lems. Western authorities believe
the Communist world is undergo-
ing a. serious internal crisis of
management and policy.
Qualified informants reported
that the United States has increas-
ed its price for a settlement in
Berlin, apparently because it feels
Russian internal problems will
force a moderation in Soviet for-
eign policy.
The two foreign ministers hope
that Gromyko will join them at
the 14-nation Laotian conference
where a treaty guaranteeing the
neutrality of Laos will soon be
signed.
At that time the two hope to
discuss the increased Berlin ten-1
sions as well as other international
problems such as disarmament.-
The two agreed the Communist1
Chinese buildup opposite the off-
shore islands of Quemoy and Mat-
su is not part of an offensive
against these islands.
They also sought some easing of
tension in South Viet Nam.
In the coming months statesmen
of the big powers are set for an-3
other round of bargaining on Ber-
lin, Laos, Viet Nam and even thet
perilous situation in the Formosac
SStrait.

'Reds Reinforce

DEAN RUSK
. .. Berlin talks
HEART DISEASE:
Cite Stress,
Smoking
CHICAGO (R)-Former smokers
who have the willpower to quit are
less likely candidates for heart
disease than many smokers or
non-smokers, a medical expert re-
ported yesterday.
I)r. Henry I Russek, a heart
specialists, said he reached two
conclusions from a detailed survey
covering 2,074 doctors, dentists
and lawyers.
1) That the smoking habit is a
barometer of how many persons
respond to stress.
2) That persons who can quit
the tobacco habit and make it
stick are more capable of adapting
to stress than many who never
have smoked or others who con-
tinue to smoke.
Russek, concultant in cardiovas-
cular disease, United States Pub-
lic Health Service Hospital, Staten
Island, N. Y., said the survey in-
dicated stress or emotional factors
play a major role in the develop-
ment of heart disease.

Border Barricade
BERLIN (P) - East Germans
toiled feverishly yesterday to
strengthen their fortifications
around West Berlin's uneasy bor-
der.
More than 300 East German
soldiers worked on the barricades
as the Western allies invited the
Soviet Union to four-power talks
in Berlin to stop the shooting
and restore free movement be-
tween the two parts of the city,
In Western allied and German
circles there was no great expec-
tation the Russians would agree
to talks. Moscow holds that the
East Germans alone are respon-
sible for security on what the Com-
munists call "the state border" in
Berlin.
Mayor Willy Brandt of West
Berlin told reporters:
"We must wait and see what
the Soviets have to say."
The fresh work on the wall and
wire stretching for 100 miles
around the west sectors appeared
to have two objects.
First the formidable barrier was
being made more escape-proof.
Trip wires were strung across
roads leading to the wall. Weak
spots in the wire were reinforced.
Secondly the troops were en-
larging and connecting up fox-
holes they have dug to give them-
selves cover during gun fights
across the border.
One work site was the East Ber-
lin bank of the river spree, where
an East border guard was shot
dead an danother injured by fire
from West Berlin police May 23.
The Vopos, as the East guards are
called, were firing at the time on a
14-year-oldboy swimming the riv-
er to escape..
University
Bicycle Shop
211 South State
Service calls on
all makes of bicycles
Fixed at your own home
PHONE NO 2-6986

World News Roundup

Court Orders
Desegregation
At Mississippi
NEW ORLEANS ()-The United
States 5th Circuit Court of Appeals
yesterday ordered issuance of an
injunction to force the all-white
University of Mississippi to admit
James H. Meredith, a 28-year-old
Negro.
In a 2-1 opinion, the court ruled
that Meredith's "application for
transfer to the University of Mis-
sissippi was turned down solely
because he was a Negro. We see no
valid, non-discriminatory reason
for the university's not accepting
Meredith."+

prepare for a court hearing in
New York today. Senators Mike
Monroney (D-Okla) and Wayne
Morse (D-Ore) both said Congress
may have to act soon to establish
a federal board to deal with air-
line jurisdictional disputes that
unions cannot settle by themselves.
Monroney, chairman of the Sen-
ate Aviation Subcommittee, called
Goldberg in for a conference but
the labor secretary declined later
to say whether the administration
is considering backing such legis-
lation.
The idea, apparently, would be
to ban airline strikes over job
rights disputes and require them to
be decided by a board, with deci-
sions enforceable by the courts.
The government pushed ahead
meanwhile with talks aimed at
ending the two-day shutdown

TOKYO-Foreign Minister Chen
Yi of Red China asserted yester-
day that Nationalist China is pre-
paring for a large-scale invasion
of the southeast Chinese coast
with United States help. Chen
spoke at a rally in Peiping attend-
ed by 20,000 persons observing the
12th anniversary of the outbreak
of the Korean War, in which Chi-
nese Red armies took part in the
guise of volunteers.
** *
WASHINGTON-The State De-
partment reported yesterday that
9,000 soldiers have been killed so
far this year in North Viet Nam's
subterranean war with 80 per cent
of the dead on the Communists
side.
WASHINGTON-A House com-
mittee charged yesterday that aid
officials have permitted both the,
deliberate and unwitting use of
American tax money to promote
Communism in Southeast Asia.

MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
and Romania called yesterday for
"free development of economic co-
operation and international trade"
and assailed the west European
Common Market as a monopoly.
* * *
NEW YORK-The Stock Mar-
ket staged a late comeback yester-
day, wiping out most of a heavy
loss, but wound up lower for the
fifth consecutive session.
Most key stocks showed substan-
tial declines around mid day in
heavy trading with the averages
down to the levels of about five
years ago.
* * *
ANKARA-Premier Ismet Inonu
announced formation of a three-
party coalition government yester-
day, promising an end of Turkey's
four-week-old cabinet crisis. The
78-year-old Turkish leader disclos-
ed that 12 of 23 cabillet portfolios,
including the foreign ministry,
would go to his Republican Party.

U

ACCOUNTING
TYPING,
SPEEDWRITING
GREGG SHORTHAND
BUSINESS MATHEMATICS
Complete Courses or a single subject
Founded 1915
Hamilton Business College
State and Williams Phone NO 8-7831

The University of Michigan Players

Playbill Summer 1962

'I

Department of Speech

OPENING
TOMORROW NIGHT
THE HIT RODGERS AND HART MUSICAL

m

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*
(C.W()

I

QUEES
GO
QID TH

1

BOYS

FROM

I

THE

I

UGO BETTI
Wednesday through Saturday, July 18-21

I

SYR AUSE
GET SEASON
TICKETS
TODAY
See student representatives at booth corner of
North University & State, or purchase season
tickets or individual show tickets at Trueblood
Aud. box office, second floor of Frieze, Bldg.,
off State Street.. ..open 10-4:45 today& 10-8
rest of week.
Season subscriptions:
All 5 shows: $6:00*, $4.00*

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A 4 to .

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to
try

Opera Department, School of Music M
Opera Double-Bill

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PUCCINI'S

Any 4 shows: $5.00*, 3.50*

lilt

1 It 1

I- T 1IftT' 'T 'VINi T! ^Yf'T 'T

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