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July 06, 1962 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-07-06

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FRIDAY, JULY 6, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THR

FRIDAY, JULY 6, 1962 TINE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

8-64 16COOL
-61 lt"N OF THE THREE GREATEST FRENCH FILMS.
Excellent.., persistently comic,
ranging from wryly ironic to
downright burlesque."
-PAUL V. BECKLEY, N.Y. Herald Tribune

ENDING
SATURDAY

SIT-INS, VOTER REGISTRATION:
America Slowly Advances in Desegregation

"For dis
Rules o
a memo
A remar
fascinat
-EUGENE
Week days
at 7 & 9 P.M.
Continuous
Sat. & Sun.
from 1 P.M.

:cernirgg audiences,
f the Game' affords
rable experience.
'kable film...
ing to observe."
ARCHER, N.Y. Times
---aim by andstarrng

(Continued from Page 1)
The school board, the complaint
charges, has assigned the Negro'
children to racially segregated
schools, maintains arbitrary at-
tendance zones, and controls as-
signments from elementary to sec-
ondary schools in such a way as to
perpetuate segregation. It also

charges that the Negro children
have been assigned to schools with
unequal facilities and overcrowded,
classes.
Stand-In
In New Orleans, a group of
white students risked suspension
from college in order to take a
stand demanding the right to take
Negro guests into the Tulane Uni-

versity cafeteria. They won their'
objective, but Edward Clark, the
student who made the test case
on the issue, was placed on "in-
definite suspension."
Clark was called in to speak to
the administrators and was told
there was an "unwritten" regula-
tion against it-and that it was
not written because such a regula-

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:r r r"ro frr{nr .':-.':}..... ................ ...............:. . . . . .. . ..:. . . . ..::. ..a..r..x;" .v":.'::. ..:-}:: ..............r i :...::: :x:r:r: vn:::R..:...":"::': :"::' . ." t
rDAILY OFFICIAL, BULLETIN
.r:. . . . . . . .

tion in black and white would
gring "repercussions" against the
University. Soon after this, Negroes
were admitted as students at Tu-
lane but Clark was still suspended
on grounds that he wilfully violat-
ed University policy.
In Louisville, Ky., stand-ins and
picketing at a movie theater have
resulted in efforts by the Mayor's
Commission on Human Relations
to open the movie to all citizens.
This was the first case of discrim-
ination handled by the new com-
mission.
Jail Students
However, no definite desegrega-
tion action was taken and recent-
ly two white supporters of the in-
tegration movement were sentenc-
ed to jail for participating in a
student demonstration protesting
the theater's policy.
Protests against the jailings went
to the Louisville mayor and the
Justice Department from the na-
tional office of the Congress of
Racial Equality, the Student Non-
Violent Coordinating Committee
(SNCC), the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, and the

Southern Conference Educational
Fund. The complaints were made
on the grounds that the sentences
were unappealable and that Louis-
ville showed poor examples of po-
lice intimidation.
In Atlanta, the Interstate Com-
merce Commission advised SNCC
that a restaurant in the Trailways
Bus Terminal has agreed to serve
all customers without regard to
race.
First Target
The restaurant was the target
of the first sit-in in a bus terminal
restaurant after the ICC announc-
ed last November that all bus sta-
tions serving interstate passengers
must serve all citizens. Voluntary
workers for SNCC were arrested
at the restaurant on the day the
ICC ruling went into effect. An
investigation was made by ICC As-
sistant Director Bernard Gould
with the final result being the in-
tegration of the restaurant.
Talladega, Ala. has been the lat-
est Deep South community to be
rocked by an upsurge of Negro
college students demonstrations

against segregation p r a c t i c e s.
There have been sit-ins, kneel-ins,
and mass marches. By May over
50 students were arrested. The
state, through the Talladega Cir-
cuit Court, tried to stop the move-
ment with an injunction. ,
The integration movement has
recently taken the form of a voter
registration drive. Groups under
the auspices of such organizations
as the National Student Associa-
tion and the American Friends
Service Committee are aiming to
educate the Negro voter as to his
rights and to encourage partici-
pation in the governmental life of
the community. In some cases,
projects of this nature involve ed-
ucating the voters as to the intri-
cacies of the laws and constitutions
of their respective states.
Presently programs are being
conducted in Jackson, Tenn., and
Raleigh, N.C.
From North Carolina to Missis-
sippi to Indiana, the American Ne-
gro is slowly but finally achieving
his civil rights.

DIAL
5-6290

er ectiorn Mdr oln

HELD OVER!
SECOND
BIG WEEK

,
',
A

(Continued from Page 2) Placem ent
Compositions Mr. Kretchmar will sing POSITION OPENINGS:
are by Caldara, Vivaldi, Mozart, Schu- Michigan Civil Service - Recreation
bert, Poldowski, Saint Saens, Ferrari, Director. Would serve as ass't. director
De Falla and Niles. Open to the pub- of a physical educ. & recreation pro-
lic. gram at a state institution. Bachelor's

MoSt Ila'rug Afa f r tat ev/er Mated
an IRRESISTIBLE FORCE against
an IMMOVABLE OBJECT !

GARlY
GRAT

DOPJS
DAY

Summer Biological Symposium: The'
13th annual symposium will be held
July 9th through 11th, and will be
devoted to the topic, "Cellular afnd
Suboellular Replication." All sessions
will be in Angell Hall, Aud. B, and will
be open to the public. The schedule
for Mon., July 9, is: 9:00 a.m., N. G.
Anderson (Oak Ridge), "The Structure
of Living Systems"; 10:15 a.m., Katsu-
ma Dan (Tokyo), "Theories of Cyto-
plasmic Division"; 2:30 p.m., Herbert
Stern (Urbana), "Biochemical Approach-
es to Mi-tosis"; 8:00 p.m., E. Kellenberg-
er (Geneva), "Electron Microscopy of
DNA-Containing Plasmas." Lectures on
Tues., July 10th, include: 9:00 a.m., H.
Stern, "Gene Regulation as the Source
of Mitotic Behavior"; 2:00 p.m., J. H.
Taylor (Columbia), "The Molecular Or-
ganization of Chromosomes in Relation
to Their Structure and Function"; 3:30
p.m., E. Kellenberger, "The Organiza-
tidnal State of the DNA in Resting and
Replicating DNS Plasmas." The sched-
ule for Wed., July 11, includes: 9:00
a.m., J. H. Taylor, "DNA Replication
and Chromosome Reproduction"; 10:15
a.m., N. G. Anderson, "Molecular Ma-
chines"; 2:30 p.m., K. Dan, title to be
announced. For further information,
contact D. G. Shappirio, 3118 Natural
Science Bldg.

B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, O.-Open-
ings as follows: Non-Technical - Sales
Correspondent, International; Internal
Auditor, Computer Consultant; Sys-
tems Trainee; Mkt. Supervisor. Con-
struction Industry; Field Auditors &
Trainees; t Sales Rep.; Construction
Acelt.; etc. Technical-Patent Attor-
ney (both chemical & mech.); Engnr.-
Corporate Engrg. Services; Sr. Products
Engnrs.; Product Engnrs.; Development
Engnr.; Machine Designer; Chemists;
Physicists; Tech. Librarian; etc.
Washington State Civil Service - 1)
Interviewers to fill openings in Em-
ployment Security Offices. Will inter-
view applicants for unemployment ben-
efits; make routine determinations of
eligibility; etc. College grad. 2) Com-'
passman to fill openings in Dept. of
Nat. Resources. Would assist in cruise of
timber keeping tally of timber volume
& making field maps, etc. At least 2
yrs. college work in forestry or civil
engrg.
Sohio Chemical Co., Lima, O. - Agri.
Sales Trainees. Employed in Lima of-
fice for 6 mos. to 2 yrs. then assign-
ed to sales territories to represent com-
pany to fertilizer manufacturers &
blenders, as well as live stock feed man-
ufacturers.

I

DIA
2-626

L A N
64
MGM aND JOSEPH E.LEVINE PRESENT
KIM NOVAK
JRMES GARNER
TONY RANDALL
IN A MARTIN RANSOHOFF PRODUCTION

JOW!

Feature Starts
at 1I :10 - 3:10
5:10 - 7:15
& 9:25

St. Clair Rubber Co., Marysville, Mich.
-Interested in young man with some
engrg. training for a Quality Control
Engrg. position. Need not be a grad,
but some educ. in this field would be
desirable.
Civil Service of Canada-Positions as
Pharmaceutical Chemists for Canadians
who are studying abroad for second or
third degrees. Desire PhD in Pharma-
ceutical or Organic Chem., but will con-
sider all univ. grads who have appro-
priate post-grad trng. & exper. in
Pharm. or Organic Chem. Location: Ot-
tawa, Ontario.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau. of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the school year
1962-1963.
Bloomfield Hills, Mich.-Elem. French,
1st grade.
Grand Morals, Mich. - Elem. (3/4
grade), 5/6 grade. 18 to 20 in class.,
Husband, wife team desired, nice town
on Lake Superior.
Menominee, Mich.-Art, Set. (8th &
9th), HS Chem/Gen. Sci., Homemaking.
Parchment, Mich.-Elem. PE, Elem.
Libr.. Lower Elem. Phys. Handi., Sp.
Ther.
Southgate, Mich.--Home Ec/Gen. Set.
(HS), Kdg., Jr. HS Girl's Couns. (MA &
3 yrs, exp.).
Wyandotte, Mich.-E. Elem., Ortho.
Classroom, Elem. Ment. Handi., Sec.
Ment. Handi., Jr. HS Span., Math.
White Plains, N.Y.-Jr. HS Engl., SS,
Ind. Arts, Fre/Latin.
* * s
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511, Ext. 3547.
Part-Time
Em ployment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, at
NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-To manage apartment. (Collecting
rents, renting apt., doing mainten-
ance). In exchange a $150.00 apt.
for $90.00. Could be a married cou-
ple.
1-Senior or Grad Student with elec-
trical background and interest.
Setting up experiments.
FEMALE
1-To cook for one person and live in.
Bus runs by house.
1-Student companion for 17 year old
blind girl. Must live in dorm. For
fall semester.
1-To live with family, doing house
work and taking care of two chil-
dren 5 and 7 years old. Would have
to be willing to go out of town and
spend the summer on Lake Erie.
Would have 11 days off per week
excluding Sat. and Thurs. Pay rate
would be $20 per week ,plus room
and board.

I

tOIGH
OUT

orfMili'*
Eastman COLOR PANA ViSION '
IG AUDREY.
YOUNG rMEADOWS

AN MGM RELEASE
CINEMASCOPE & METROCOLOR
NEXT
"ADVISE AND CONSENT"

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|

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L~ 4~

2et

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. . . . . . . . . .

COMING..
THE U-M PLAYERS PRODUCTION OF PETER SHAFFER'S
CRITICS' CIRCLE AWARD PLAY,

&

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I F~
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1
I

A GAY 8IE MOOD...
with C. S's navy
cotton Scotch plaid
belted slim sheath...
lightened and
brightened with a
soft, pale blue oxford

a

shirt.

Jr. Sizes

"A powerful and absorbing drama ... A forcefulness and sense

of truth that are tremendous."

-New York Post

Shirt. . . .$3.98
Sheath....12.98
Full Skirt.... 9.98
Slim Skirt .... 7.98

Wednesday through Saturday, July 11-14
8-00 P M.. Trueblood Auditorium. Frieze Bldg., Huron cr. State

Double Breasted Vest ... 7.98

inz"M,1 !j I PM. nneie mmusTheatre* iI

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