100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 03, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JULY 3, 1962

THlE MICHIGAN T1ATJT

sa 1 aa Va 1V'!fl LH1LZ

PAGE THREE

c'

t

'Coriolanus'

I

Lecturers
Cite Aspects
Of Cancer
Despite improving methods in
examination and treatment, death
rates from cancer of the breast
have not changed significantly
during the last 25 years, a Uni-
versity of Texas expert told the In-
stitute of Cancer last week.
Robert L. Egan therefore urged
a greater use of X-raying the
breast, or mammography.
This procedure is extremely val-
uable because it can detect clinic-
ally unsuspected lesions. The
method's sensitivity is 97 per cent
accurate.
Prof. Harry M. Nelson of the
obstetrics and gynecology depart-
ment at Wayne State University
spoke on the second most common
cause of death from cancer among
women-cancer of the cervix.
Although this disease "has the
best prognosis of all major forms
of malignancy," only 40 per cent
of such cases are cured.
He noted that awareness by
women of routine , examinations
for the cervical cancer is distress-
ingly low.
A recent survey, for example,
showed that of every 10 adult
women in the United States, four
had never heard of the so-called
'Pap' smear, and three of the re-
maining six had never had it.

I I

AGITATE, MOTIVATE:
Bernstein Tells Teachers
To Pose Good Questions

IFIE&S

By JOHN CONLEY
Do you want to motivate stu-
dents?
Make them think?
Manage the class better?
Then ask good questions.
So said Prof. Abraham Bern-
stein of the education school at
Brooklyn College in addressing the
Conference Series for Teachers of
English yesterday.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

-Daily--Michael de Gaetano
A TRAGEDY--The speech department yesterday presented scenes
from William Shakespeare's Coriolanus. Shakespeare (right) took
the play from Plutarch's accounts of Roman history, adding a
slightly old English twist so that his Renaissance audiences could
identify with the action. Herbert Propper (left) portrayed Corio-
lanus soliciting before the Roman crowds and, in a later scene,
conferring with his mother about his elitist attitudes.

Prof.sBernstein asserted that it's
not just any questioning that's
involved but the probing kind that
discomposes and provokes the stu-
dent and agitates him into disequi-
librium, that makes him eager to
speak out.
"You're not interesting, you
know, and you talk too much," he
told the unprotesting pedagogues.
"Even allegedly stupid children are
less 'stupid' than their teachers
think or even than they themselves
think. Good questions will work
miracles and bring out their best.
"But avoid silly or just fact
questions," Prof. Bernstein de-
clared. "Not 'Did you enjoy the
book?' That evokes only a 'Nah,
teach!'
Whom Does It Please?
"Try 'What kind of person is
most likely to enjoy this book the
most-or least-the rich man, the
poor man, the group-up? Why?'"
Prof. Bernstein compared the
wisely questioning teacher to the
psychoanalyst in his power to gain
interest and response merely by
asking appropriate, challenging
questions and leaving himself and
his opinions out of the process.
The object in this give-and-take
is not so much getting "answers"
as getting responses to challenges.
Discreet Discipline
Urging kindliness in seeking stu-
dent reactions, he declared that
even problems of class discipline
yield more to an asking than an
accusing manner.
For vocabulary lists, Prof. Bern-
stein had nothing but scorn. "Build
vocabulary by wide reading," he
insisted to the English teachers,
"and if you want your students
to read, you better read, too. Your
enthusiasm or lack of it commu-
nicates to the class."
Faith in the intelligence of
young people, the posing of tough
questions, but pacing them prop-
erly with no rush for answers were
other ingredients the lecturer pre-
scribed.
Across
Campus
Con-Con *. *

LINES
2
3
4

1 DAY 3 DAYS
.70 1.95
.85 2.40

1.00

2.85

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Phone NO 2-4786

FOR RENT
SUMMER APT. for 2 or 3 on campus.
Call NO 8-8601. 05
FOR RENT-Good garage. Near State
and Packard. NO 2-0521 or 917 Mary
Street. C21
FOR RENT-Campus four room apt.
Summer price $60. Phone NO 3-4322.
019
FOR RENT-2 bdrm. unfurnished house.
Utility room-screened porch. $115 per
month. Call NO 5-6772. 014
APT. ON HILL ST. for 1 or 2 students
for fall-ail furnished and utilities
paid. Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. C10

USED CARS
1961 SAAB-Fully equipped. 13,000 miles.
Best offer. NO 2-2763. N3
FOR SALE -- '56 Volkswagen, rebuilt
motor, radio. In top condition. $695.00.
Phone YU 2-5551 Port Huron, Mich. N2
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
LAMBRETTA 150cc. scooter. Spare bas-
ket, and clock. NO 3-9542 afternoons.
Z2
CUSHMAN MOTOR SCOOTER. Good
condition. Lights, storage compart.
Make an offer. Call after 6 NO 3-2089.
Z4

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Daily photographers. Positions
open now. Join the staff and earn real
money. See Mike at 420 Maynard. A2
FOUND-A good place to spend your
spare time earning money. Join The
Daily photography staff. See Mike at
420 Maynard. Al
HELP WANTED
WE NEED HELP. Join The Daily pho-
tography staff now. Earn while enjoy-
ing life at The Daily. See Mike at 420
Maynard. H3
COLLEGE MEN
Part time nelp-17 hours per week.
Summer school student preferred.
Working schedule will be arranged to
fit class and study schedule if neces-
sary.
Salary offered-$50 per week.
Call Mr. Miller, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
662-9311. Hi
PERSONAL
CRAW, why must you be such a slave
driver. The helpless one. F4
HURRY!! Singers needed immediately
for Univ. Summer Choir. See Dr. All-
feris, Lane Hall. Fin
CREATIVITY STIFLED? Join The Daily
photography staff. Financial remuner-
ation. See Mike at 420 Maynard. F10
GEORGE-See you in "Upper Room" of
YMCA this Sunday at the 10:30 a.m.
service of the University Reformed
Church. F9
RECORD CLUB needs membere, We
spend the evening in dark rooms list-
ening to records. Meet at Engin Arch
evenings at 9:30, bring date and rec-
ords. F3
MUSICAL MDSE,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
AT GRINNELL'S
Used Upright Practice Pianos
$89.50

Summer Rates

NEED A BIKE!!

Furnished apts. from $60 up. NO If your soles are wearing thin on the
5-9405. C20 hot summer sidewalks, stop in at

I PROF. ABRAHAM BERNSTEIN
I ... questions questions

___. i

Emotional Ills
Said To Plague
Student Health,
A 10-year study at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin shows that emo-
tional problems ranked third
among university students' ail-
ments.
The study, conducted between
1949 and 1959 by Alfred S. Evens
and Jeffrey Warren, found that
the "Big Four"'among the 10 most
common diagnoses were respira-
tory infections, skin eruptions,
psychiatric problems and gastro-
intestinal upsets.
A factor in the relative frequen-
cy of emotional problems seen at
the student health facilities might
be the availability and the low
cost of counseling and psychiatric
services, the doctors suggested.
Another factor might be the
greater likelihood of emotional
problems emerging in university
students than in people in a more
stable environment.
The findings seem to point up
a need for psychiatrists and der-
matologists, at least on a consult-
ant basis, in university health de-
partments, they said.
ADA Selects Cofn
As New President
Prof. Jerome W. Conn of the
internal medicine department was
recently elected president of the
American Diabetes Association.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Corps SpurnsTexas Contract
4'

AUSTIN--The Peace Corps has
announced that the University of
Texas' action on an integration
suit filed last year by three Negro
students was the "catalytic agent"
in the Corps' decision not to award
a $257,500 training contract to the
university.
The suit, filed .November, 1961,
called for complete integration of
all University of Texas housing fa-
cilities. Briefs were subsequently
filed by Texas Attorney General
William Wilson in a Federal court
Choir Works
In Summer
The University Choir is contin-
ning its activities this summer un-
der the direction of guest director
Prof. James Aliferia, of the New
England Conservatory of Music in
Boston.
The group holds rehearsals
Monday through Thursday from 4
to 5:15 p.m. in the Lane Hall base-
ment and plans to climax its sum-
mer activities with a concert in-
cluding works ranging from, Early
Renaissance to modern selections.
Anyone interested in joining the
choir is invited to come to one
of the rehearsals and audition.
Tenors and basses are particularly
needed.

"where it remains today," The
Daily Texas reported.
The Peace Corps, which had
used campus facilities last year,
assumed that the university held
a cooperative attitude towards in-
tegration. "However, the attitude
expressed in the university's action
on the law suit contradicted 'our
original opinion," a Peace Corps
representative explained.
* * *
EVANSTON - Members of the
Northwestern University branch of
the American Association of Uni-
versity Professors last month pro-
posed stiff increases in faculty par-
ticipation in policy making.
Payson S. Wild, Northwestern
vice-president: and dean of facul-
ties, "indicated a willingness to
discuss the proposal for implemen-
tation next fall," The Daily North-
western recently reported.
The resolution calls for "ex-
pansion of, the authority of the
University Senate in all areas af-
fecting the educational life of the
university, including participation
in the formation of policies gov-
UGLI Presents
Series of Films
Documentary films ranging from
studies of nature to an explana-
tion of the novel are offered for
public viewing each day at 2 p.m.
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
Undergraduate Library. No admis-
sion is charged for this program,
which runs through July 25.

erning budgets, admissions, stu-
dent affairs, and intercollegiate
athletics, and in the review of
their execution."
* * *
CHICAGO-Students at the Chi-
cago Normal College, which is the
second largest teacher's college in
the city, last month demonstrated
against a decision on the part of
the college's trustees to incorporate
Northpark College and CNC into,
an educational complex.
The demonstrations occurred
over a two-week period and in-
cluded picketing of the trustee's
homes and the estate of CNC Pres-
ident Arthur F. Daly. Police called
a halt to the student protests after
Daly's life was threatened.
* * *
HANOVER - Dartmouth Col-
lege alumnus Charles Gilman re-
cently donated $1 million toward
the establishment of a bio-medical
center on the Dartmouth campus
to be named after him.
The center will consist initially
of five grouped inter-connecting
buildings housing Dartmouth's de-
partment of biological sciences.
HOUGHTON - The Michigan
College of Mining and Technology
has been awarded a grant by the
Atomic Energy Commission for the
use of a Cobalt-60 Irradiator.
The irradiator will be used in
Michigan Tech laboratories for in-
struction and research in muta-
tions. It will also be used for ex-
perimentation in the conversion of
irradiant energy into electrical
energy.

NEW twu bedroom apartment units now
being completed on South Forest for
Sept. occupancy. For appoint. to see,
call Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor
NO 3-0511. 02
SUBLET immediately for summer. Two
bedrm.. cool basement apt. Recently
redecorated, very comfortable, good
location, reduced price. Call 665-8944
evenings or 663-1511, ext. 277 days.
Ask for Bev, 04
BUSINESS SERVICES
HARPSICHORD INSTRUCTION by grad-
uate of Yale Shool of Music. Call NO
8-8309 a.m. and 3-1511, Ext. 2092 after-
noons. J10
ANY MOTH HOLES, tears, or burns in
your clothes. We'll reweave them like
new. WEAVE-BAC SHOP, 224 Arcade.
J3
All roads lead to
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Food
Specialties
Kitchen Utensils
Open every night till Midnight
J5
COME IN AND BROWSE AT THE
TREASURE
MART

FOR SALE
740 c.c. farl-Day. motorcycle, $500. NO
5-4453 at 12:15 and 6:00. B7
FOR SALE-1960 Volvo; radio, heater,
whitewalls, 4-speed, Excellent shape.
Phone 479-7436. N4
GET into the swing of things. Order
yoijr summer Daily now!!! Call 662-
3241. B2
DIAMONDS-Wholesale from our mines
to you. Buy direct and save. Robert
Haack Diamond Importers, 504 First
National Bldg. NO 3-0653. B5
SPECIAL CAMPUS RATES

BEAVERS'S BIKE
AND HARDWARE
Ask about Beaver's
BIKE RENTAL
(by the week or month)
Your bike failing?
Beaver can restore it to good health.

605 Church

NO 5-6607
zi1

Used Grands

from $495

Brand New Spinet

$399

xi
MISCELLANEOUS
SOUTH CENTRAL MICHIGAN Soaring
Society memberships open. Located in
Napoleon, Mich. Call NO 8-8338 after
6 p.m. M4
DO YOU FEEL LOST at college? Do you
feel out of it because you don't know
what's going on? Subscribe to the
summer Daily. Only $2.00. Call 662-
3241. M3

Magazine
Life
Time

Term Student Faculty
& Clergy

yr. $ 2.98
2 yrs. 5.95

Prof. James K. Pollock of

the

2y
3y

political science department will
lecture on "The Convention as a
Representative Body" as part of
his series on the recently-ended
Constitutional Convention at 4:15
p.m. today in Aud. A.
TV Trends...
James Sharone, general man-
ager of a Detroit telivision station,
will speak on "New Trends in Tel-
evision" at 3 p.m. today in the
West Conference Rm. at Rackham.
His lecture is under the auspices
of the speech department.
Concert .. .
The Stanley Quartet, composed
of four distinguished music school
professors, will give a concert at
8:30 p.m. today in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.

529 Detroit St.

NO 2-1363

Featuring student furnishings of all
kinds, appliances, typewriters, televi-
sions, bicycles, etc. Open Monday and
Friday Evenings 'til 9.
J4
MORRI LL'S
Office and School
Suppl ies
RENT A TYPWRITER
to help your way
through college
SPECIAL
SUMMER RATES!

Sports Illustrated;
2y
Arch Forum ;
Fortune
Newsweek ;
Saturday Review;
2y
Atlantic 8 m,
New Yorker 8 m,

yr. 4.00
yrs. 7.50
yrs. 11.50
yr. 4.00
yrs. 7.50
yr. 3.50
yr. 7.50
yr. 3.50
yr. 4.00
yrs. 7.50
nos. 3.00

$ 2.98
5.95
6.00
7.50
12.00
4.00
7.50
3.50
7.50
3.50
7.00
12.00

os.

If you are looking for a good
time and an ice cold beer
this summer come-to the
SCHWABEN INN
at 215 Ashley
The only place in town fea-
turing the gigantic POOR
BOY SANDWICH and the

3.00

BANG-=UP;
e// 1Tfor\the 4th
100, BETTER DRESSES

'II

314 S. State

NO 5-9141

Call 662-3061 or write Student Periodical
Agency, Box 1161, Ann Arbor for other
special offers. B-1
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
TIRE SALE
Get our price before you buy! Life-
time guarantee. No money down. Up
to one year to pay. Specializing In
brake service and motor tune-ups.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Main at Catherine NO 8-7717
S3
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
S2
C-TED
STANDARD
SERVICE
FRIENDLY SERVICE
IS OUR BUSINESS
Stop in NOW for
brake work
engine tune-up
battery and tire check-up
"You expect more from
Standard and you get it."
SOUTH UNIVERSITY & FOREST
NO 8-9168
Si

terrific SCHWABENBURG
Beer-Wine-Liquor
WANTED TO BUY
WANT TO BUY LIGHTWT GIRLS B
Sandy oJhnson, NO 5-4453.
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S WEAR; SUMMER SPECI
Short sleeve sport shirts $1.25
Wash & wear pants $3.95, 4.95,
Briefs or shorts 69c; Canvas ca
$2.95-3.95. Many other BIG B
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washingto
Orange 6?o33om

of every kind
Many originally to 29.95

$1000

Cottons-Dacrons-Arnet Jerseys-Linens
Silk Prints-Blends-Knits
100 BETTER DRESSES
Sizes in Both Groups
$700
Sizes in the above groups for Tiny 7-15, tall and
petite 10-18, Average 10-44, Shorter 121/2-24I/2.

J2
COEDS:
While you're having a FREE cup
of coffee, why not have your
HAIR DONE at the
VOGUE BEAUTY SALON
300 S. Thayer in the concourse
of the Bell Tower
Where it's COOL all summer long,
Call NO 8-8354, also evenings
by appointment

ER
M2
BIKE
K1
IALS.
up;
5.95;
suals
m St.
W
y

i

I

Experienced Hair Stylists

Ji

Haller's Jewelr
712 N. University Ave.

ALL SPRING AND
SUMMER HATS
Orid. to 12.98. Group of better
s u m m e r handbags (including
black patents). Blouses, Jackets,
Raincoats, Strapless Bras.
$398

SPRING COATS
NOW
Originally were to $49.95
$14.98 - $25.00
Group of Summer Bags, Hats,
Bras, Girdles and Panty Girdles,
Better Jewelry.

e U
- * t ., Take ITravele r s Che k s from
' Ann Arbor Bank along .

i
i

1.98

1

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan