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June 28, 1962 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1962-06-28

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THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'THTIRSDAY. JUNE 28, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

KEYNOTES LECTURE SERIES:
Owens Describes Efforts To Aid Youth

By EARL POLE
"The problems of today's youth
are not their inherent shortcom-
ings, but the result of a lack of
competent leadership" former
Olympic great Jesse Owens said
yesterday in his keynote address
for "American Youth, 1962," a
Summer Session lecture series.
Owens' lecture, "The Problems
of American Youth," dealt pri-

marily with Chicago, which he
considers to be a cross-section of
the nation's population.
Owens became concerned with
the few employment opportunities
open to young people with no ex-
perience in group labor. The prob-
lem is enhanced by the increas-
ing number of high school drop-
outs, Owens indicated.

'U' Administrators Discuss
Legal, Moral Responsibility

(Continued from Page 1)
As in the case of any felony,
the policy notify the dean of men's
office when a student is arrested.
The University then insures that
the student has bail and defense1
counsel.
If he is convicted, the University
suspends him until he presents
Health Service a psychiatrist's let-c
ter saying that he is a good social
risk. Such a letter may be suffi-
cient for the University to allow1
a student to be readmitted, though
at times other factors may be in-
volved.
"The University has to take thet
position that homosexuality is a
crime," Vice-President for Student
Affairs James A. Lewis declared,
summing up the University's at-
titude toward convicted homosex-
uals.
Stringent Faculty Enforcement
The University views the case of
faculty and staff members con-
victed of homosexual crimes in a,
different light than students sim-
ilarly convicted.
This is because the University'
realizes that a certain amount of
sexual experimentation is frequent
during adolescence, and homosex-
ual practices among college stu-
dents, while not common, lack the
serious implications which homo-
sexuality among responsible adults
entails, Vice-President for Aca-
demic Affairs Roger W. Heyns ex-
plained.
.While the University is inter-
ested in the climate students cre-
ate for each other, they are not
employed to make a wholesome in-
tellectual atmosphere; faculty
members are employed for that
explicit reason, and it is up to the
University to insure that they ful-
fill this image," Heyns said.
No Happy Home
"Idon't want the University to
become known as a happy home
for these people," Executive Vice-
President Marvin L. Niehuss said.
Fishery Unit
Reports Drop
Of Lamprey
The catch of sea lamprey at
Lake Superior barriers has de-
clined sharply, the Great Lakes
Fishery Commission reported last
week.
But this is a good sign - sea
lamprey in past years have nearly
wiped out lake trout in the Great
Lakes, and a lessening of the pre-
dator population may herald a re-
juvenation of commercial fishing
in the area.
With most of the lamprey
spawning season over, only 6,191
have been caught at assessment
barriers, as compared to 51,628 at
this time last year.
The commission, a joint agency
between the United States and
Canada, decided at its June 19
and 20 meetings in Ann Arbor to
continue its program of chemical
treatments of streams feeding in-
to Lake Superior. This project, be-
gun In 1958, is the major effort
towards reducing the sea lamprey
population.

When the University hears of a
faculty member's arrest on these
charges, Niehuss said, the dean of
his school or college talks to him,
but no action is taken until the
trial is completed and guilt has
been established.
Resignation to the Situation
There have been no known cases
of dismissals; usually the faculty
member resigns, Niehuss said.
"Each case is handled individ-
ually. There is no hard and fast
rule, but the University feels it
must be rather careful."
Prior to the police investigation,
the University had attempted to
curb homosexual incidents in its
buildings.
An investigation by the admin-
istration resulted in the closing,
after 5 p.m., of several men's lav-
atories in Angell, Mason, and Hav-
en Halls and in the restrooms of
the Undergraduate Library.
The University is continuing to
study the problem, Lewis said.
No solution has been found as of
yet.
TOMORROW - The medi-
cal, legal and social problems
of homosexuality.
Name Professors
For LSA Group
The Regents have appointed
Professors Samuel J. Eldersveld of
the political science department
and Arthur M. Eastman of the
English department to three-year
terms on the Executive Commit-
tee of the literary college.

These people are usually un-
successful in finding employment.
"Thus a new breed is developing,
resulting in a large number of
teenage robberies."
Owens spoke of his direct in-
volvement in alleviating the prob-
lem by assuming directorship of
the South Side Boys Club of Chi-
cago in 1951.
In that capacity and as a gov-
ernor-appointed member of the
Illinois Youth Commission, Owens
talked to many parents on Chi-
cago's low-income south side.
"Many of these people grew up
in the depression and consequently
have the feeling that the world
owes them something and expect
to get things for nothing," Owens
said.
Recreation
The club's purpose was to pro-
vide the direction that was pre-
viously lacking in their lives. Its
facilities nowinclude a swimming
pool, a gymnasium, a shop and
a library.
Owens related an experience he
had when he told a group from
the club of the conditions of
youth in post-war Europe. The
boys felt that they should offer
some assistance but being finan-
cially indigent one of them sug-
gested that all they could offer
was a word of prayer.
The group began holding prayer
meetings in the club's basement
but soon outgrew the space. Their
weekly meetings are now held in
Chicago's Masonic Temple. On
weekends the boys earn money by
carrying groceries for shoppers at
local supermarkets. That money
is used to buy 'Care' packages for
Europe.
Crime Down, Sales Up
Business in the south Chicago
area are finding that their sales
are up, due to the decrease in
juvenile crime rate. They there-
fore lend financial support to the
Boys Clubs of Chicago, whose
efforts are partly responsible for
their rise in profits.
Owens praised Chicago business-
men for setting an example of
leadership which the youth of
America need. He also stressed the
need for closer family relations,
which provide young people with
a greater degree of responsibility
necessary for their development.
"The problems of American
youth," Owens concluded, "are the
same which have faced young

a

U' Doctors
Do Research
On .Brains
Tests which may ultimately shed
light on how to locate and cure
brain disorders have been con-
ducted by Drs. Kenneth A. Koci
and Baus K. Bakchi of the Medi-
cal School.
Speaking at a June 15 meeting
of the American Electro-encephal-
ographic Society in Atlantic City,
they related how they measured
the responses by brains during
deep sleep to flashes of light.
The researchers found that the
character of such responses is dif-
ferent from recordings made while
the patient is awake, and that
they are distributed widely over
the entire surface of the brain.
Responses are sharper at the
beginning of the tests, before the
subject becomes accustomed to the
light flash, and some similarities
in wave sequences have been dis-
covered between all individuals.
In their research, the doctors
used a unique instrument called an
average response computer, which
screens out natural brain activity
to focus upon the responses to the
stimuli.

FOR RENT
SUMMER APT, furnished for 3 or 4.
Excellent location. Call NO 3-6357. C8
SUMMER APT for 2 or 3 on campus.
Call NO 8-8601. C5
FOURTH ROOMMATE WANTED-7-rm.
apt., 2 refrigerators. TV, parking, Call
3-1511, Ext. 3096 till 5. Peter. C16
FOR RENT-Campus four room apt.
Summer price $60. Phone NO 3-4322.
C19
FOR RENT-2 bdrm. unfurnished house.
Utility room-screened porch. $115 per
month. Call NO 5-6772. C14
PARKING SPACE behind Campus The-
atre. $5.50 per month. Call NO 3-4322.
C13
SUMMER APT. FOR 2-1block from
Law Club. Call NO 3-0150, ask for
Rich. C15
1 APT. FOR SUMMER for 2 or 3 stu-
dents-all furnished and utilities paid.
Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. Ci
APT. ON HILL ST. for 1 or 2 students
for fall-all furnished and utilities
paid. Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512.tClo
2 BEDROOM FURNISHED HOUSE-Oil1
heat included. Suitable for 3 to study.
$115. NO 5-1151. C9
Summer Rates
Furnished apts. from $60 up. NO
5-9405. C20
SUMMER RENTALS available now. De-
luxe furnished apartments at summer
prices. Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor.
NO 3-0511. Cl1
ROOMS FOR SUMMER, on quiet, shady
st. 2 blks. from campus-I Wk. from
eating places-cross ventilation. 1320
Forest Ct. Ph. 3-4685. C7

LINES
2
3
4

.70
.85
1.00

1.95
2.40
.2.85

1 DAY 3 DAYS

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Phone NO 2-4786

JESSE OWENS
.. . helps Chicago youth
people since the beginning of time,
but because of the pressures of the
age and bad newspaper publicity,
are magnified many times, until
they become alarming."

USED CARS
FOR SALE-1960 VOLVO; radio, heater,
whitewalls, four - speed. Excellent
shape. Phone 479-7436. B6
FOR SALE--Fiat Bianchina 1959. Ex-
cellent shape. 15,000 miles. $350. Call
NO 2-4842. Ni
BUSINESS SERVICES
ANY MOTH HOLES, TEARS, OR BURNS
in your clothes? We'll reweave them
like new. WEAVE-BAC SHOP, 224
Arcade. J3
LATE, LATE SNACKS?
RALPH'S MARKETr
is open every night
till midnight!
ANYTHING YOUR LITTLE
STOMACH DESIRES
709 Packard J7
COME IN AND BROWSE AT THE
TREASU RE
MART

I

IfflDr'

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.

Lubrication $1.50

Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
S2

Wilcox Applauds 'Stability'
Of Investment inReal Estate

C-TED
STAN DARD
SERVICE
FRIENDLY SERVICE
IS OUR BUSINESS

',

"Whatever sharp or irrational
realignments of values have taken
place on other investment fronts,
real estate has maintained its
stability," Arthur P. Wilcox, presi-
dent of the National Association of
Real Estate Boards, said last
Thursday.
Speaking at recognition exercises
of the University's real estate cer-
tificate program, Wilcox explained
that real estate values are based
on two fundamental elements:
population gain and the fixed
supply of land.
The only area in which demand
for land has not advanced since
last year is in residential sub-
division development, and even
this sector has remained con-
stant, he said.
Demand Up
Demand for land has gone up
for farm expansion, investment,
commercial construction, indus-
trial development, and for recrea-

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(Continued from Page 4)

Novi, Mich - 3rd grade, 6th grade,
Jr. HS Engl., SS/Coach, Sdi/Math. j
St. Clair, Mich. (East China Twsp.,
SchC.) - Elem., Jr. HA Girl's PE, Ha
Art, Engl; Guid. (Woman).
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511, Ext. 3547.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Chrysler Corp., Detroit, Mich. - Posi-
tion involving Mathematical Analysis in
Treasurer's Office. Should have sound
mathematical bkgd. & should be thor-
oughly familiar with the operation of
large-scale computers. Desirable to have
general knowledge of investment field.
Fair Winds Girl Scout Council, Flint,
Mich. - Two vacancies for professional
field workers with Bachelor's preferably
in Sociology. Minimum of 20 hrs. in,
social sciences is required. Exper. not
required, however, group work exper.
helpful. Will be assigned area consist-
ing of 4 or 5 neighborhood associations.
General Linen Supply Co., Detroit,
Mich. - Sales Manager - BA, prefer-
ably in Bus. Ad. Five yrs. exper. in sales
supervision, marketing exper. Will co-
ordinate sales & marketing for a 20
route service co. Will plan and exe-
cute sales prog.
National Safety Council, Chicago, Ill.
-Research Correlation Specialist for
development of a prog. integrating re-
search and accident prevention activi-
ties of the Council. MA minimum, un-
derstanding of man-machine relation-
ships, and ability to interpret research
for use by prog. specialists.
National Phosphate Corp., New York,
N. Y. - Interested in graduate Chem.
and Mech. Engnrs. for Chemical Ferti-
lizer plant in Midwest. Would be assist-
ants to Dept. Heads. Oppor. for ad-
vancement.

Pan American Union, Washington,
D.C. - Personnel Technician-grad with
major in Public or Personnel Admin.,
or equiv. exper. & trng. 3 yrs. exper.
in Personnel admin. Good working
knowledge of Spanish. Apply by July
16.
The Houston Post, Houston, Texas-
(1) Systems & Procedures Analyst. De-
gree Bus. Ad. or Engrg. Two or more
yrs. exper. in industrial organization.
Age 25-35. (2) Personnel Director. De-
gree required. (personnel &/or psych.
desirable.) Five o rmore yrs. exper. in
managerial position in Personel Dept.
of sm. to med. size company. Age 30-45.
Goldman, Sachs, & Co., Detroit, Mich.
-Men who want to enter Security Sales.
Exper. & acquainted with financial an-
alysis, which may have been gained
through exper. or studies. Would be pri-
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially rec-
ognized and registered organizations
only. Organizations planning to be
active for the Summer Session
should register by July 3, 1962.
Forms available, 3011 Student Acti-
vities Building.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, Meta-
physical Meeting, June 28, 7:30 p.m.,
528D, SAB.
Folk Dancers, Meeting, Instruction,
Dancing, June 28, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill.
nj?xknowl-6kpgimentshouldss

marily concerned with institutional &
substantial individual accounts.
Rockford Housing Authority, Rock-
ford Ill. - Housing Authority Director-
Master5s in Planninfi Urban Renewal or
Geog., Sociology, Ecology, Public Ad-
mi. or related field. Some exper. in
urban renewal. (or BA in one of above
plus 2 yrs. exper. in urban renewal.)
Apply by July 20.
Connecticut Civil Service - Airport'
Manager-Degree with courses in Bus.
Ad., Transportation, or Civil Engrg. plus
2 yrs. exper. in airport mgmt. including
1 yr. in supervisory capacity. Residence
waived. Apply by July 11.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, at
NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
-Several students to sell summer
and/or fall-winter-spring University
Players season tickets on a com-
mission basis,
-Several students to sell subscriptions
to the Michigan Daily on a com-
mission basis.
3-Engineering students to do main-
tenance in exchange for an apart-
ment on campus.
FEMALE
I-To sell ladies ready-to-wear. Must
be over 21 years of age and exper-
ienced. Full-time, permanent posi-
tion.
1-To cook for one person and live in.
Bus runs by house.
-Several students to sell summer and/
or fall - winter - spring University
Players season tickets on a com-
mission basis.
-Several students to sell subscrip-
tions to the Michigan Daily on a
commission basis.
1-Student companion for 17 year old
blind girl. Must live in dorm. For
fall semester.

tional purposes, especially near
urban and water centers, Wilcox
said.
He also pointed out the histori-
cal use of land as a factor in
winning national freedom, and
emphasized that much of the poli-
tical unrest in South America is
"set to the terrbile tune of bread,
land and liberty."
But in the United States, he
said, the philosophy "that a citi-
zenry of land owners is the sound-
est foundation for freedom did
much to shape the character and
prospects of our nation."
129 Certificates
Certificates of recognition were
awarded to 129 persons who com-
pleted a series of eight extension
courses given by the Extension
Service and business administra-
tion school, in cooperation with
the Michigan Real Estate Associa-
tion.
Businessmen
Take Courses,
Broaden View~s
For the next four weeks 37 busi-
nessmen from around the country
will become very academically-
oriented, as they comprise the stu-
dent body for the ninth annual
Executive Development Program,
sponsored by the business adminis-
tration school.
University professors will lec-
ture on human relations in man-
agement, marketing, economics,
accounting and business condi-
tions.
The aim of the program is to
help broaden the businessman's
knowledge and appreciation of
fields other than his own.
Subscribe
to
SThe
Michigan
Daily

FOR RENT FOR SUMMER-2 single
furnished rooms for boys. Share kit-
chen and bath with 2 others. Packard
corner of Vaughn. Call NO 8-8912 after
5:30. Ci
NEW two bedroom apartment units now
being completed on South Forest for
Sept. occupancy. For appoint, to see,
call Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor
NO 3-0511. C2
SUBLET immediately for summer. Two
bedrm., cool basement apt. Recently
redecorated, very comfortable, good
location, reduced price. Call 665-8944
evenings or 663-1511,eext. 277 days.
Ask for Bev. C4
1 GIRL wanted to share apt. with 2
other girls for summer or perm. New-
ly redecorated with carpeting & wood
panelling. Close to hospital & cam-
pus. $50 per mo. per person. Phone
NO 5-5364 after 5:30 p.m.
NEW APARTMENTS
Now renting for summer occupancy
2- and 3-bedroom furnished apts at
1000 Oakland. Paneled living room,
carpeted throughout, modern furni-
ture, from $200. Call Don Chisholm ,
NO 5-9114.
RBOR
~SSOC I ATES,

REALTORS
1829 W. Stadium at Pauline NOJ

5-9114
C3

MISCELLANEOUS
DO YOU FEEL LOST at college? Do you
feel out of it because you don't know
what's going on? Subscribe to the
summer Daily. Only $2.00. Call 662-
3241. M3
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S WEAR; SUMMER SPECIALS.
Short sleeve sport shirts $1.25 up;
Wash & wear pants $3.95, 4.95, 5.95;
Briefs or shorts 69c; Canvas casuals
$2.95-3.95. Many other BIG BUYS.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington St.
W1
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

Featuring student furnishings of all
kinds, appliances, typewriters, televi-
sions, bicycles, etc. Open Monday and
Friday Evenings 'til 9.
MORRI LL'S
Office and School
Supplies
RENT A TYPWRITER
to help your way
through college
SPECIAL
SUMMER RATES !

529 Detroit St.

NO 2-1363

Stop in NOW for
brake work
engine tune-up
battery and tire check-up
"You expect more from
Standard and you get it."
SOUTH UNIVERSITY & FOREST
NO 8-9168
Si
FOR SALE
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER, 1958 Royal;
Harmony Guitar; Argus 35mm. camera
with flash. NO 5-4018 after 6. B3
\FOR SALE-Jazz-wide selection; also
classical, folk records and paperbacks
-all very cheap. Phone 2-4226. B4
DIAMONDS-Wholesale from our mines
to you. Buy direct and save. Robert
Haack Diamond Importers, 504 First
National Bldg. NO 3-0653. B5
HELP WANTED
COLLEGE MEN
Part time help-17 hours per week.
Summer school student preferred.
Working schedule will be arranged to
fit class and study schedule if neces-
sary.
Salary offered-$50 per week.
Call Mr. Miller, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
662-9311. Hi
PERSONAL
CRAW, why must you* be such a slave
driver. The helpless one. F4
GET into the swing of things. Order
your summer Daily now !I Call 662-
3241. B2
RECORD CLUB needs members. We
spend the evening in dark room's list-
ening to records. Meet at Engin Arch
evenings at 9:30, bring date and rec-
ords. F3
ROOMATE wanted for summer to be
fourth man in large apartment. $170
for summer, including food. 5-7892 or
2-3241 and ask for Fred, Arnie, or
Jerry. F8

314 S. State

NO 5-9141

J2
COEDS:
While you're having a FREE cup
of coffee, why not have your
HAIR DONE at the
VOGUE BEAUTY SALON
300 S. Thayer in the concourse
of the Bell Tower
Where it's COOL all summer long.
Call NO 8-8354, also evenings
by appointment

AT GRINNELL'S

Used Upright Practice
Used Grands
Brand New Spinet

Pianos
$89.50
from $495
$399

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Experienced Hair Stylists

Ji

xi'
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L II?

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daily except Sunday
at the
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U

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