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June 27, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-06-27

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DA JrlX

b A 1-4Q Imftim vp

uENSA JN17,16 FN TflIA~ iW.

PAGTHREEUZSI

*,

PREVENTION OF CANCER:
Reviews Research Advances

U' Hosts Girls' State';
Legion Sponsors Parley

i

LUSIINE&Sr

By JOE FELDMAN
Dr. Robert M. Taylor, executive
director of the National Cancer
Institute of Canada and a Fellow
of the Royal College of Physi-
cians, addressed the Institute on
Cancer Control yesterday morning
on "The Prevention of Cancer."
Dr. Taylor indicated that there
are steps that can be taken to pre-
vent many types of cancer. He said
"it is only natural to turn to the
possibilities of prevention of can-
cer as a more effective means of
control and this brings up to a
consideration of the causes."
Heller To Review
Cancer Research
Dr. John R. Heller, president of
the Memorial Sloan - Kettering
Cancer Center will speak on the
"Current Status of Cancer Re-
search" at 8 p.m. today in the 5th
level auditorium of the Medical
Science Building.
AIR CONDITIONED
BOWLING
1:00 P.M. - 11:00 P.M.
daily except Sunday
at the
MICHIGAN UNION

"Undoubtedly, the greatest at-
tention has been paid to the iden-
tification of industrial carcino-
gens."
(Industrial carcinogens include
such organic chemicals as coal tar,
petroleum products, and aromatic
amines; such inorganic chemicals
as arsenic, asbestos, chromates,
and nickel; such physical agents
as ultra violet radiation and ioniz-
ing radiation.)
Most Frequent

Dr. Taylor stated that in these
groups the most frequent types of
cancer have been of the skin.
He said that there are also a
large number of non-occupational
carcinogens to which cancers can
be traced. These come under cate-
gories of personal habit, dietary
habits and imbalances, medical
therapy, customs, and atmospheric
conditions.
As in a speech by Dr. Abraham
Lilienfeld of Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity School of Hygiene andPub-
lic Health Monday, much atten-
tion was devoted to the smoking of
cigarettes.
Filters Falter
Dr. Taylor quoted a report of
the Royal College of Physicians of
London which in part stated that,
"The most reasonable conclusion
from all the evidence on the asso-
ciation between smoking and dis-
ease is that cigarette smoking is
the most likely cause of the recent
world-wide increase in deaths
from lung cancer."
He said the Royal College of
Physicians' report suggested the
removal of harmful substances
from tobacco smoke, but that fil-
ters cannot yet solve the problem.

3
f
1
t
i
l

DR. ROBERT TAYLOR
. .. cancer prevention

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill
Announces
Thursday night, June 28, . . . 7:30
The first in a series of MOVIE NIGHTS
"THE HIGH WALL" a psychological
case study of a young bigot.
"THE CHOSEN PEOPLE," a Catholic
viewpoint on antisemitism

MARKETING:
Cites 'Key'
In Utilities
The key to growth in the gas,
electricity and telephone industry
is marketing, Prof. Martin R.
Warshaw, of the business admin-
istration school, declared recently.
Speaking to the 45th National
Conference of the American Mar-
keting Association, Prof. Warshaw
said this industry has achieved
"vertical penetration of markets,"
and now should concentrate on
horizontal penetration.
He defined this as "getting high-
er rates of usage from present
customers with respect to existing
services as well as through the in-
troduction of new service applica-
tions."
Colored Phones
In promoting the items which
provide this penetration, such as
colored telephones, home inter-
com systems and air conditioners,
Prof. Warshaw advocated imagi-
native, well-planned and skillfully
executed marketing programs.
"Management must consider
their purpose to be the sale of
energy and communications, rath-
er than sale of gas, electricity and
telephones," he said. He warned
against taking too narrow view of
the range of services of product
offerings.
"Preoccupation with increasing
penetration in terms of old serv-
ices or too much attention to im-
proving the efficiency of energy
production may leave a firm or an
industry wide open to competition
from those providing new ways to
satisfy consumer wants," he warn-
ed.
Fuel Cells
Therefore, in the field of energy
services, the firm which has come
up with fuel cells, gas turbines,
or even some method of harnessing
solar radiation will come out on
top.
Prof. Warshaw cautioned that
the gas, electricity and telephone
industry is no longer a protected
monopoly. Rather, rivalries exist
within the industry as different
forms of energy and communica-
tion service vie with one another.
Hold Lectures
For Lawyers
An annual "refresher course" for
state lawyers wound up yesterday
with sessions in St. Joseph and
Jackson.
During the previous two weeks,
the Institute of Continuing Legal
Education, a facility of the Law
School, the Wayne State Univer-
sity law school and the state bar
of Michigan, has sponsored a set
of lectures on tax problems involv-
ed in "Organizing Small Michigan
Business Enterprises."
Speakers have been faculty
members from the Detroit College
of Law, WSU and Duke University,
while sessions were also held in
St. Clair, Boyne Falls, Windsor,
Delta College and Detroit.

By DENISE WACKER
Over the past 22 years, several
thousand young women from
throughout Michigan have been
selected by local chapters of the
American Legion Auxiliary, or re-
lated service organizations, to at-
tend a political workshop for high
school seniors held at the Univer-
sity known as "Girls' State."
This year 420 girls were chosen
on the basis of character, leader-
ship, and service to their commu-
nities, Mrs. Ramey Addington, di-
rector of the 1962 Girls' State,
said yesterday.
A booklet describing, in part,
the purpose of the session explains
that it is held "to emphasize the
importance of government in mod-
ern life; to stimulate a deep and
lasting interest in government";
and to enlarge the girls' under-
standing.
To enable the girls to better
grasp the workings of local as well
as state government, political par-
ties ("Nationalist" and "Federal-
ist") are established and the girls,
who are organized into living units
called "cities" (named after for-
mer leaders of the Michigan Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary), elect their
officers, including a governor and
lieutenant-governor.
During the Girls' State session,
which began June 19 and which
ends tomorrow, young representa-
tives live in a University residence
hall and are treated to lectures
and political instruction by cam-
pus and state personalities.
Norman C. Thomas and Simon
Perry of the political science de-
partment "have been teaching the
girls government all the time
they've been here. The instruc-
tion begins just after breakfast,"
Mrs. Addington said.
Hallinan Views
Atlanta Ruling
'On Integration
"Segregation is not a Southern
problem, it is a national problem.
and a national disgrace," The
Most Rev. Paul J. Hallinan, Roman
Catholic Archbishop of Atlanta,
Ga., declared here yesterday.
Speaking at a breakfast in the
Gabriel Richard Center, of St.
Mary's Student Chapel, the Most
Reverend Hallinan stated that
there was surprisingly little re-
action to the desegregation deci-
sion, announced in a pastoral let-
ter read on Sunday, June 10, in all
churches of the North Georgia
archdiocese.
The Archbishop mentioned one
anonymous telephone call and sev-
eral crank letters "nine of them
from north of the Mason-Dixon
line."
"In the North, hyprocrisy is a
substitute for law," he said.
Praising Atlanta's civic leaders
for their cooperation in the de-
segregation problem, he said, "At-
lanta is a very mature and proud
city."
He pointed out "quality of lead-
ership that has determined that
Atlanta is going to move ahead and
be one of the greatest cities in the
United States."
The decision to integrate follow-,
ed consultation with white and
Negro leaders, church members
and school principals. The same
admission standards will apply to
both white and Negro children, he
said.
DIAL 5-6290
Playing Through Thursday

WALT
DISNEY'S
"Big Red"
Shows at I, 3,5,7, 9 P.M.
F R I DAY [
CARY GRANT

She also noted yesterday that
Joseph Collins, state chairman of
the Democratic State Central
Committee, and Republican State
Central Committee C h a i r m a n
George Van Peursem delivered an
address on state politics to the
girls in Rackham Aud.
"Before the end of this year's
activities, four girls-two regulars
and two alternates-will be select-
ed to represent the state of Michi-
gan at Girls' Nation, held July 29-
Aug. 4 at the American University
in Washington, D.C.," Mrs. Ad-
dington concluded.
Noyes Notes
CEEB Tests
By JOHN CONLEY
The College Entrance Examina-
tion Board has made progress to-
wards its goal of bringing "order
out of chaos," Prof. Edward S.
Noyes, president of the CEEB, told
the 12th Annual Summer Series
for Teachers of English Monday.
Prof. Noyes said that the CEEB
was originally created to relieve
the impossible burden on high
school teachers who were trying
to prepare their students for the
widely varying types of entrance
exams.
Tracing the course of the "col-
lege boards" from the "restricted"
exams as they were called in the
first two decades of this century,
Prof. Noyes moved on through the
"comprehensives" of the 20's and
30's to the tremendous revisions
caused by the war years.
Numbers Rise
He continued to describe the
more recent years when the over-
whelmingly large numbers of stu-
dents swarming for admission to
colleges demanded that the tests
become less the traditional essay
type and more the "objective" va-
riety capable of quick, electronic
grading.
Despite his own professed skep-
ticism for the "objective," multi-
ple-choice kind of test, Prof. Noyes
defended the high accuracy it has
in predicting who among those
tested will be really good writers
later on in college.
He personally looks back with
nostalgia to the old essay days
when it was the delight of the
CEEB readers to assemble student
"boners" as a by-product of their
heavy labors.
Cites Growth
The growth in English examina-
tion testing alone, says Prof.
Noyes, can be measured by con-
trasting 1941's total of 5,071 stu-
dents taking "the boards" with
200,000 in 1961.
It took 94 readers to grade these
1941 exams, the last of the "coi-
prehensives." Had the 1961 set been
read in the same way and not
graded electronically, some 3,000
readers would have been required
Despite the electronic emphasis,
a "writing sample" question is still
being experimented with because
the colleges want one. The CEEB
is also in the process of compiling
a volume which will attempt to set
reasonable expectations for end-
of-year goals in literature, lan-
guage, and composition in grades
9 through 12.

FOR RENT
SUMMER APT, furnished for 3 or 4.
Excellent location. Call NO 3-6357. 8
SUMMER APT. for 2 or 3 on campus.
Call NO 8-8601. C5
FOURTH ROOMMATE WANTED-7-rm.
apt., 2 refrigerators, TV, parking. Call
3-1511, Ext. 3096 till 5. Peter. C16
FOR RENT-2 bdrm. unfurnished house.
Utility room-screened porch. $115 per
month. Call NO 5-6772. C14
PARKING SPACE behind Campus The-
atre. $5.50 per month. Call NO 3-4322.
C13
SUMMER APT. FOR2- 1block from
Law Club. Call NO 3-0150, ask for
Rich. C15
1 APT. FOR SUMMER for 2 or 3 stu-
dents-all furnished and utilities paid.
Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. Ci
APT. ON HILL ST. for 1 or 2 students
for fall-all furnished and utilities
paid. Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. C10
2 BEDROOM FURNISHED HOUSE-Oil
heat included. Suitable for 3 to study.
$115. NO 5-1151. C9
PARKING SPACE for rent. One block
from campus. Call 5-7892 or if no an-
swer call 2-3241 and ask for Fred. 06
SUMMER RATE-Modernly furnished 1-
bedroom apt. All utilities included.
$50. 3 blocks from campus. NO 3-7268.
017
SUMMER RENTALS available now. De-
luxe furnished apartments at summer
prices. Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor.
NO 3-0511, Cl
APT. FOR SUMMER, on quiet, shady
st. 2 blks. from campus-1 blk. from
eating places-cross ventilation. 1320
Forest Ct. Ph. 3-4685. 7
NEW two bedroom apartment units now
being completed on South Forest for
Sept. occupancy. For appoint.,to see,
call Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor
NO 3-0511. C2
SUBLET immediately for summer. Two
bedrm., cool basement apt. Recently
redecorated,very comfortable, good
location, reduced price. Call 665-8944
evenings or 663-1511, ext. 277 days.
Ask for Bev. 04
1 GIRL wanted to share apt. with 2
other girls for summer or perm. New-
ly redecorated with carpeting & wood
panelling. Close to hospital & cam-
pus. $50 per mo. per person. Phone
NO 5-5364 after 5:30 p.m.
NEW APARTMENTS
Now renting for summer occupancy
2- and 3-bedroom furnished apt. at
1000 Oakland. Paneled living room,
carpeted throughout, modern furni-
ture, from $200. Call Don Chisholm,
NO 5-9114.
RBOR
SSOCIATES,
REALTORS
1829 W. Stadium at Pauline NO 5-9114
C3
BUSINESS SERVICES
Variety is the SPICE OF
RALPH'S MARKET
Picnic Supplies
Party Foods
Kitchen Supplies
Kosher Foods
709 PACKARD-OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT
J6
MISCELLANEOUS
DO YOU FEEL LOST at college? Do you
feel out of it because you don't know
what's going on? Subscribe to the
summer Daily. Only $2.00. Call 662-
3241. M3
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S WEAR; SUMMER SPECIALS.
Short sleeve sport shirts $1.25 up;
Wash & wear pants $3.95, 4.95, 5.95;
Briefs or shorts 69c; Canvas casuals
$2.95-3.95. Many other BIG BUYS.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington St.
Wi

Figure 5 average words to a line
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

LINES
2
3
4

FOR SALE
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER, 1958 Royal;
Harmony Guitar; Argus 35mm. camera
with flash. NO 5-4018 after 6. B3
FOR SALE-Jazz-wide selection; also
classical, folk records and paperbacks
-al very cheap. Phone 2-4226. B4
DIAMONDS-Wholesale from our mines
to you. Buy direct and save. Robert
Haack Diamond Importers, 504 First
National Bldg. NO 3-0653. B5

SPECIAL CAMPUS RATES

ONE-DAY
.70
.85
1.00

Magazine Term
Life yr.
2 yrs.
Time yr.
2 yrs.
3 yrs.
Sports Illustrated yr.
2 yrs.
Arch Forum yr.
Fortune yr.
Newsweek yr.
Saturday Review yr.
2 yrs.
Atlantic 8 mos.
New Yorker 8 mos.

Student Faculty

$ 2.98
5.95
4.00
7.50
11.50
4.00
7.50
3.50
7.50
3.50
4.00
7.50
3.00
3.00

& Clergy
$ 2.98
5.95
6.00
7.50
12.00
4.00
7.50
3.50
7.50
3.50
7.00
12.00

PERSONAL
CRAW, why must you be such a slave
driver. The helpless one. F4
BEAUTIFUL brunette needs male as-
sistants to help out afternoons. Call
Joanne at NO 2-3243. F2
GET into the swing of things. Order
your summer Daily now!!! Call 662-
3241. B2
RECORD CLUB needs members. We
spend the evening in dark rooms list-
ening to records. Meet at Engin Arch
evenings at 9:30, bring date and rec-
ords. F3
ROOMATE wanted for summer to be
fourth man in large apartment. $170
for summer, including food. 5-7892 or
2-3241 and ask for Fred, Arnie, or
Jerry. F8
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
BEDROOM SIZE TV
8" Portable $129.00
Miniature Tape Recorder
all battery
70 mins. recording $99.00
Service & Repairs
Free pickup & delivery
NO 5-8607
HI FI & TV CENTER
next to Hill Aud. on Thayer St.
TRANSPORTATION
.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Call 662-3061 or write Student Periodical
Agency, Box 1161, Ann Arbor for other
special offers. B-1
HELP WANTED
COLLEGE MEN
Part time help-17 hours per week.
Summer school student preferred.
Working schedule will be arranged to
fit class and study schedule if neces-
sary.
Salary oftered-$50 per week.
Call Mr. Miller, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
662-9311. Hi

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
3.48
4.20
4.95

Call NO 3-4156

W"

USED CARS

FOR SALE-1960 VOLVO; radio, heater,
whitewalls, four - speed. Excellent
shape. Phone 479-7436. B6
FOR SALE-Fiat Bianchina 1959. Ex-
cellent shape. 15,000 miles. $350. Call
NO 2-4842. Ni

Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday .
$15.00 plus 90 a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.

'x xv rv aex a s a e a - -- - - - - - - - - --F 7' 7 Il

Welcome Summer 'StudE

3

Make

r

ADMISSION FREE

ALL WELCOME

L undaqe StrAet
307 South State Street

nts
GIFTS

THE U. of M. NEWMAN CLUB
Invites You To A Presentation Of
THE MORAL AND MEDICAL ASPECTS
OF BIRTH CONTROL PILLS
by Dr. John A. O'Sullivan
Rev. John F. Bradley
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 8:00 P.M.
NEWMAN CENTER, 331 Thompson St.
Refreshments served, followed by
reception for all new students
Some of the Additional Coming Events:

Your headquarters for
CARDS J EWELRY
.,, CANDY

c

11

JULY 11:
JULY 14:
JULY 25:
AUG. 5:

ROME, RUSSIA AND REUNION
Eastern Rites and Eastern Churches
Day Trip to Assumption Univ., Windsor
C.F.M., or the MARRIAGE MAKERS
MASS at a Byzantine Catholic Church
Trip to St. Stephan's Parish, Detroit

DORIS

DAY

in
That Touch of Mink

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II

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Swim -Picnic- Bring The Entire
Family For An Outing

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