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August 11, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-08-11

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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5

CONSTRUCTION:
Projects Illustrate Growth

To View Political Ways
To Handle World Police

PROSPERITY:
Hard Work Yields European Miracle

(Continued from Page 1)
came chancellor in 1951. He re-
garded the neighborhood not only
as one of the most urgent prob-
lems facing the university, but
"as one of the greatest challenges'
to be met.
Kimpton inaugurated a "self-'
help" program for the university
and the city which since has been
adopted by other schools facing
similar problems.
Under his leadership, a mass
meeting of citizens interested in
changing and improving condi-
tions was held, and a committee
of five, under Kimpton's chair-
manship, was established to in-
vestigate possible immediate ac-
tion. An off-shoot of the original
group was a permanent organiza-
tion, the South East Chicago Com-
mission, basically a public law-en-
forcement and social-work agen-
cy.
G. A. Action
After conducting preliminary re-
search, the Commission offered a
study on urban renewal recom-
mending definite slum clearance
actions, to the Illinois General As-
sembly. Following this, the G. A.
passed legislation implementing
the g e n e r a 1 recommendations,
which made it possible for the
university to get control of sur-
rounding territory through the
right of eminent domain.
This was of course followed by
an energetic drive to secure funds
which would permit building clear-
ance and renovation, and which
would also finance construction of
desperately needed buildings.
Chicagoans contributed hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars, and
the city government inaugurated

a program intended to reverse the
trend toward deterioration which
characterized the South Side.
However, the money thus secured
was insufficient, and Federal aid
was sought, and eventually appro-
priated.
Common Problem
A second school cited in the re-
port, the University of South Flor-
ida, had difficulties slightly more
common than those at Chicago. It
was a newly planned and con-
structed institution having "the
good fortune to be free in their
campus planning to make a clean
start with no hobbles of pre-exist-
ing patterns ... but faced with the
severe judgment of posterity . ..
After the initial problem of fi-
nances and location and a name
for the institution were decided,
the greater difficulty of planning
what the college would be had to
be settled.
The original recommendations of
the Florida Council for Higher
Education were that the new
school should be a four-year de-
gree-granting institutio with em-
phasis on the liberal arts.
Area Strength
However, due to the general area
surrounding the site of the future
college, it was evident that the
school should have not only a
strong liberal arts program but
should also offer courses in busi-
ness administration, education and
fine arts.
The academic program was given
a great deal of consideration, for
it determined the type, size, ar-
rangement and functional rela-
tionships of the campus.
After determining education ob-
jectives, the first step was to list
functions central to the university,

and necessary in the first years of
its existence. It was decided that
besides classrooms, laboratories,
and the like, that a student union,
athletic fields, and a library would
be needed. The library was planned
as both the symbolic and actual
"heart" of the campus.
One to Three
It was also determined that the
number of classrooms needed
would be about one for each three
faculty members-and would grow
and was scheduled to be increased
by about 50 classrooms per year.
Howard College, located in Bir-
mingham, Alabama, was a third
school discussed in the report. Its
chief planning difficulties were a
lack of funds due to a rather
bitter feeling toward the school
among its constituents.
Several years ago when it de-
cided that the school simply had
to expand, for its lack of libraries,
classrooms and laboratories gave it
a rather low academic rating, and
this discouraged qualified students'
from applying.
Unlike the University of Chi-
cago, it couldn't expand in the
city, for the price of land sur-
rounding it shot up to astronom-
ical figures after the college's in-
tended growth was made public,
and the state legislature refused
to cooperate with the school's of-
ficials.
Moreover, when it was finally
determined that the best possible
solution would be to move 11 miles
away from the Birmingham site,
the Alabama Baptist State Con-
vention, which had founded the
school and which represented its
chief means of financial support,
refused to back the move.
Only after a Rockefeller Founda-
tion grant was awarded the col-
lege (to enable it to shift loca-
tions) did the Baptists support the
move, enabling payrolls to be met,
and books, lab equipment and
other education necessities to be
purchased.
The college shifted sites in 1957,
and since then has, in the impar-
tial words of its president, per-
mitted "the metropolitan area of
Birmingham and the Baptists of
Alabama have a rightful pride in
the campus of Howard College."

By ROBERT SELWA
Prof. J. David Singer and five
other American scholars will begin
this fall a study of methods of
political control over an interna-
tional police force.
Prof. Singer of the Mental
Health Research Institute will
undertake the study for the Peace
Research Institute of Washington.
The institute requested and re-
ceived a $20,000 grant from the
Arms Control and Disarmament
Agency for it.
The question of political control
over an international police force
is important particularily because
preparation for disarmament has
to involve preparation for its en-
forcement, Prof. Singer said.
Police Protection
"It is safe to assume that an
international police force will be
necessary not only to enforce dis-
armament but also to protect the
nations that disarm from those
who might not," he said.
"Political control of the police
force will be necessary to insure
that the force won't become a
tyranny of its own."
The task force will also study
the effective use of the police--
its budgeting and staffing, for
example.
The six scholars will meet at
Princeton University in October to
discuss the general problem and
to divide up research. In February
they will meet again to put to-
gether a report.
Task Force
The other members of the task
force are Lincoln Bloomfield of
the Massachussetts Institute of
Technology, Roger Fisher of the
Select Films
For Festival
Five half-hour programs pro-
duced by the Television Center
have been selected for showing at
the UNESCO World Conference on
Music and Television which starts
Aug. 23 at Salzburg, Aust.
The five programs are: "Labor
Songs," "A Baroque Sampler,"
"Hootenany," "Opera Emerges"
and "Tchumarochka."

Harvard Law School, Walter Mil-
lis of the Center for the Study of
Democratic Institutions at Santa
Barbara, California, Richard C.
Snyder of Northwestern Univer-
sity and Hans Morganthau of the
University of Chicago.
Prof. Singer has been research-
ing the problems of peace and dis-
armament for several years. He
has completed a book on "Deter-
rence, Arms Control and Disarma-
ment," which will be published
shortly.
PROGRAM NOTES:
To Present
Session Unit
In Concert
James Aliferis will conduct the
summer session choir for a con-
cert on Monday at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Aud. The concert is being
presented under the auspices of
the music school.
Mozart Sonatas ...
On Tuesday the music school
will present pianists William Os-
borne and Kenneth Roberts with
a recital of Mozart's "Sonatas for
Four Hands at One Pianoforte."
The recital is scheduled for 4:f5
p.m. in the Lane Hall Aud.
'Collegium Musicum'**
Also Tuesday, the music school
will present the "Collegium Musi-
cum." The concert, called "A
Study in Improvisation" will be
directed by Robert Warner as-
sisted by Carolyn Rabson, treble
recorder; Marilyn Mason, harpsi-
cord; Gilbert Ross, violin; Gustave
Rossells, violin; and Jerome Jel-
enek, cello. The entire University
Consort will be performing, also.
Reality, Poet.. .
On WSMB, Channel 10, will be
Walter Kerr interviewing poet,
playwrite Archibald Mcleish on
reality and the poet. The interview
is featured on "Writers of Today,"
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.I

By The Associated Press
LONDON -Western Europe has
rolled up its sleeves and gone to
work, and the result is an eco-
nomic miracle.
Shattered by war two decades
ago, countries that once were
enemies have banded together as
friends into an economic commun-
ity that is growing strong as the
steel rolling from its factories.
What's behind this unprece-
dented leap? Leading economists
and industrialists agree that the
right combination of factors play-
ed a part.
Manpower Reserve
They point to Europe's man-
power reserve and its capacity for
boosting production, to the im-
petus given Europe in the immed-
iate postwar years by the Marshall
Plan and, subsequently, by the
Common Market and the Euro-
pean Payments Union.
Italian experts contend the
boom represents a new outlook on
life. Europeans, they say, have
started to live, to work hard and
acquire the things they.once only
dreamed about: refrigerators, cars,
television sets.
Ferdinando Innocenti, 71-year-
old head of a huge Italian firm
turningout motor scooters, autos,
machine tools and steel products,
explains:
Starting to Live
"After World War II people
everywhere in Europe, particularly
Italy, started to live, as good liv-
ing is understood today. They
found they could get a better life
by working and spending what
they earned. The result was a
market of demand,"
Says Vittorio Valletta, 79-year-
old president of Italy's giant Fiat
Auto Works: "People everywhere
have rolled up their shirt sleeves'
and started work seriously in
every field." He credited also Mar-
shall aid and the need to re-build
war-shattered Italian industry.
Libero Lenti, professor of politi-
cal economics at Pavia University,
says "the considerable spirit of
enterprise" by Italian industrial-
ists spurred his country's boom.
Italy, he adds, also benefitted
from a large labor force.
Improved Productivity
In West Germany, the chairman
of a leading construction and en-
gineering firm says the boom re-

.. .-

ita

-Daily-Kenneth Winter
COMMON MARKET-France, West Germany, Italy, the Nether-
lands, Belgium and Luxemberg have joined together to create
Western European prosperity through the Common Market.

WhereoVStay
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~ " You.r 1best local
Source Of adv~ice
--- Q l about a trip foie
Seattle WorI4' Fair
is TIRAVRtL INC.
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the aaigehlei
for yblI With
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(Continued from Page 2)
pianists and graduate students in the
School of Music, will present a special
recital of Mozart's Sonatas for Four
Hands at One Pianoforte on Tues., Aug.
14, 4:15 p.m., Lane Hall Aud. Open to
the public without charge.
Recital Cancellation: The doctoral re-
cital of Morris Hochberg, violinist,
scheduled for Sun., Aug. 12, has been
cancelled because of illness.
Summer Session Choir: The Univ.
Summer Session Choir with James Ali-
feris, guest director, will present a
concert on Mon., Aug. 13, 8:30 p.m., Hill
Aud. The program will consist of the
music of Victoria, Byrd, Healey WilIan,
Daniel Pinkham, Morley, Gibbons,
Pilkington, Le Jeune, Brahms, Earl
George, Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber,
and Vaughan Williams. Soloists in addi-
tion to the choir and instrumental
personnel are MillardaCates, tenor, and
Dolores Wheeler, soprano. Graduate as-
sistants to Mr. Aliferis is Jerry Stafford
with accompanists Rebecca West and
Joan Luchs, piano, and Kathryn Eskey,
organist. The program is open to the
public without charge.

',Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
U.S. Air Force Officer Candidate Pro-
gram, Mon., Aug. 13-Sgt. Robert Warn-
er will talk to students interested in
careers on America's Aerospace Team
from 2:00 to 4:00 Monday afternoons
at Michigan Union, ground floor oppo-
site cafeteria, in connection with Air
Force Exhibit which will be set up for
the next 4 weeks. Openings avail, for
Pilots & Navigators as well as other op-
portunities for college men & women.
INVITATION TO AUG. GRADS:
Seniors graduating in August are wel-
come to visit offices of Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB, weekdays to look
over current position openings in va-
riety of fields, and browse thru direc-
tories of employers, schools, govern-
ment opportunities and company litera-
ture. All graduates with minimum of
12-15 semester hours at U. of M. are
eligible to register for placement serv-
ices. Hours: 8:30-12:00 and 1:30-4:30.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Talon, Inc., Meadville, Pa.-Openings
as follows: General Accountants-de-

INC.
400 MAYNARD STREET NOrmandy 5-3733;

gree or major in acc't. some exper. Mili-'
tary fulfilled; Chemist or Chem. Engnr.
-ProductionSupervision; Mech., Elec-
trical, Project, & Design Engineers.
Methods & Time Study Engnr.
State of Vermont-1) Forestry Super-
visor in field of Pest Control. Gradua-
tion from School of Forestry with ma-
jor in forestry & minor in entomology
and/or pathology. 4 yrs. exper. in per-
tinent field or 2 yrs. grad study & 2
yrs. exper. 2) Foresters. Degree with
major work in Forestry. 2 yrs. exper.
required for higher level forester posi-
tion.
Armstrong, Lancaster, Pa.-1) Non-
technical openings in fields of: Ac-
counting; Advertising, Promotion &
Public Relations; Credit Management;
Personnel; Production Planning & Pur-
chasing. 2) Technical: Chem. Engnr.;
Industrial Engrg.
* * *
For further information, please call
General Division, Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
Pant-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Bldg., during the following hours: Mon.
thru Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students

for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Good commercial artist for news-
paper advertising. Part-time or full-
time.
80-Psychological subjects. Must be stu-
dents. At least one, 2 hour session.
20-30-Students to wait tables and buss
dishes from August 26th thru Au-
gust30th. About 5 hours per day.
Salary plus meals.
FEMALE
1-Good commercial artist for news-
paper advertising. Part-time or full-
time.
1-Food supervisor. Degree in dietetics
or equivalent experience. Monday
thru Friday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
20-30-Students touwait tables and buss
dishes from August 26th thru Au-
gust 30th. About 5 hours per day.
Salary plus meals.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Graduate Outing Club. Canoeing and
cookout, 1:45 p.m. tomorrow, Huron St.
Entrance, Rackham Bldg.

sulted from two great reserves:
manpower and productivity im-
provement.
Another industrialist says the
decisive factor and sustaining
power of the boom is that "the
working people used their physical
and mental strength down to the
very last in fighting for the very
basis of their existence."
Whatever the reason, the West
German economy is growing twice
as fast as that of the United
States.
Growing Quickly
In fact, according to United
Nations figures, all six European
Common Market countries but
Belgium developed more rapidly
than the U.S. during the 1950's.
West Germany was far ahead of
all Western Europe, followed by
Italy and Austria.
Trailing at the opposite end of
the scale, Britain-now trying to
get into the Common Market, and
Ireland showed the lowest growth
rate-well below the U.S., Sweden,
Denmark and Norway also de-
veloped more slowly than America.
Figures are based on the per-
centage increase of total domestic
output in Western Europe and
North America during the decade
ending in 1959. They were worked
out for an elaborate economic
study of the 1950's, to be published
later this year.
Severe Measures
David Stout of Oxford Univer-
sity says the severe measures
taken to restrict demand on gold
reserves caused Britain's slower
growth. He says the measures
caused production growth to halt,
even more backward. Growth rate,
he adds, has been at 3 per cent a
year since 194.
, il ! III Ia 1 i ul t , I I
DIAL 5-6290
HELD OVER AGAIN!
For the first
time-an
unprecedented
3rd week
for
THE MOST MARVELOUS MOVIE EVER MADE I
FROM THE PLAY THAT KEPT PLAYING FOREVER I
..~ Mrdit Yfa
-ALSO
BUGS BUNNY
IN
"BILL OF HARE"



And C. T. Saunders, director of
the National Institute of Economic
and Social Research in Britain,
says the country is dependent on
markets in primary producing
areas in parts of the world where
incomes have risen least. Britain,
he says, is losing its share even
in these markets.
Further, he adds, each burst of
output expansion has led to a run-
ning down of exchange reserves,
greatly exaggerated by specula-
tion. Hence, expansion has to be
curbed repeatedly by government
action.
Explains Boom
From Switzerland, Dr. Samuel
Schweizer lists the Marshall Plan,
the European Payments Union, the
European Common Market and
the Free Trade' Association as
prime reasons for his country's
boom.
Schweizer, board president of
the Union Bank of Switzerland,
adds that relatively stable prices
contributed kreatly to a virtually
uninterrupted economic growth
since World War II.
{ Ernest Schmidheiny, b o a r d
chairman of Swissair, ascribes the
European recovery to Marshall aid
and to the tremendous backlog for
expansion from the war.
Whatever the reason, both sides
of the world are watching the de-
velopments with more than casual
iterest.
i l~l~llllll !11l~illll I 11u14t( DIAL 2-6264
q'~ l lI~llill llUlt

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PRODUCED BY
ROBERT COHN, 1941
UNIVERSITY OF MICH.

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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Woshtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas Park, Vicar
SUNDAY
9:30: Bible Study
10:00 a.m. Worship Service.
6:00: Supper-Program,
WEDNESDAY
10:00 p.m.: Midweek devotion in chapel

It

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ARTEMI S

A

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Miss Anna M. Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Worship Service and Communion
1 :15 a.m. Bible Study .
7:00 'p.m.Discussion on "American Cultural
Religion"
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Contemporary Literature Review
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fouser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses at 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12:00
and 12:30
Daily Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 and 12:00

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill Street
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Anthony and June Bing, House Directors
NO 2-9890
SUNDAY MORNING
10:00 a.m. Meeting for Worship
11:00 a.m. Young Friends and Adults: Dis-
cussion
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Assist. Pastor, Armin C. Bizer
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
2250 Fuller3Rood (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister
Morning Worship 9:30 A.M.
Child Care

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roses. It takes to the automatic
with beautiful ease. Aurora pink,
bluebell, gold, royal, fiesta red.
Sizes 10-16.
$1504

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MICHIAE I{ CUFF IJAMES INICK
CAINIROBERT'SONJMcMFOhlffAMS
SUYllY ANNE~ SEANIE
RIPHARAREEH lM PAS

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d9mm

Dial
8.6416

"Suspenseful farce! Leave it to the Italians to make
impotency a laughing matter ... The climax is hilarious!"
-Dorothy Masters, New York Daily News
IT LIGHTS UP A HUSH-HUSH THEME OF
LIFE WITH BEAUTY AND BRILLIANCE I

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Gr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
guild House at 524 Thompson

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097

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