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August 07, 1962 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1962-08-07

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IrA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SOME SUCCESS, SOME FAILURES:
Pryor Analyzes 'Communist Common Market'

STATE RACES:
Democrats,]
Square Off
(Continued from Page 1)

By GERALD STORCH
Basing his conclusions on three
years of extensive research, in-
cluding interviews with Commun-
ist officials, Prof. Frederic L. Pry-
or of the economics department
analyzes "Communism's 'Common:
Market'" in an article in the
latest issue of Michigan, Business
Review, a publication of the busi-
ness administration school.
He writes that "although many
anomalies have been eliminated
and improvements h a v e been,
made," the trading and produc-
tion patterns of the Eastern
Europe bloc still leave much to be
desired.
Most bloc nations are concen-
trating on coal as a source of
energy, which "seems quite irra-
tional in light of the large oilj
reserves in the bloc;" the ratio of

machines traded to machines pro-
duced is still very low; and in
agriculture, the Stalinist self-suf-
ficiency ideas prevail over the ef-
forts for coordination.
In tracing the market's history
from its postwar days under
Joseph Stalin through its present
efforts, Prof. Pryor notes the
stringency of several of the early
policies.
Russian Exploitation
In the Stalin period, the Soviets
exploited the satellite countries
economically. These countries
were sometimes paid less for their
exports to Russia than the world
market rates, and by taking over
German property in the satellite
nations, the Russians gained pri-
vileged positions for scarce mate-
rials and labor skills.
Another major Stalinist policy

LesmPeace Corpsmen
Explain Two-Fold Training

involved the deliberate isolation of
the various Communist countries
from each other, and the encour-
agment of economic self-suffi-
ciency for each.
As a result, these market
countries were forced to invest in
high-cost industries. And with the
great deal of parallel investments
occurring, all of the nations had
a constant shortage of vital com-
modities, especially raw mate-
rials.
But by 1954, new forms of
economic cooperation were being
attempted, the author continues,
and limited arrangements for the
diversification of industries among
the different members were made.
"For intra-bloc relations, 1956
was a watershed year," Prof. Pry-
or writes. Russia eliminated some,
although not all, of its price dis-
crimination and, "so far as it is
possible to discover, stopped med-
dling in the economics of bloc
nations, and gave the planners
and politicians a higher degree
of autonomy."
In this year, too, an economic
planning group, the Council of
M u t u a 1 Economic Assistance,
greatly enlarged its scope, setting
up 12 standing committees to con-
sider industrial planning areas
such as coal, electricity and fer-
rous metals.
Inadequacies
"However, this early enthusi-
asm was somewhat misdirected,
since the council had no really
adequate decision-making mate-
rial to draw up any kind of work-
able program," he contends.
Department Sets
Citation Assembly
The speech department is hold-
ing a speech assembly for the
"Citation of Graduates" at 3 p.m.
today in Rackham Amphitheatre.

In 1957, most of its recommen-
dations were "quietly shelved.
Since then, specialization discus-
sions have been slower and less
spectacular, but more thorough
and systematic."
At present, the council, whose
importance Prof. Pryor feels has
been largely ignored, has three
main functions: drawing up the
recommendations for production
specialization, exchanging techni-
cal information, and coordinating
the national plans of member
countries.
Chemical Success
The group has had some suc-
cess in recommendations for areas
of chemical products and equip-
ment to produce chemicals. Dis-
cussions in other major produc-
tions are proceding more slowly,
but hundreds of recommendations
and agreements have appeared.
In the council's action in the
raw materials sector, those nations
with the richest mineral deposits

are to increase their production
greatly, while less well-off coun-
tries are reducing their efforts.
Up to 1960, the CMEA's most
important function was the ex-
change of technical information,
Prof. Pryor says. This was the
area of greatest participation by
the Soviet Union.
Hold Meetings
Often, all-bloc conferences on
special scientific questions have
been held, and attempts have
been made to coordinate indus-
trial research projects to eliminate
duplication.
The third function - making
planners more aware of present
and future deficits and surpluses,
demand and supply within the
bloc-nations - has seen several
riew developments recently.
The council has encouraged the
drawing up of 15-year plans with-
in each country, and announced
they would be made consistent
with each other. Up to now,
though, not every nation has com-
pleted its preliminary projects.
Not Super-Board
Although the CMEA's coordi-
nating of planning has been grow-
ing ,at the present moment it
"is not a supra-national planning
body," Prof. Pryor emphasizes. "It
has not drawn up an all-bloc mas-
ter plan, nor would it have any
powers of enforcement if it did."
This, in turn, means that the
Communists' "Common Market"
is not a common market at all, if
one means the establishment of
restrictions on flows of capital,
trade, or labor between countries.
But through its reliance on
bureaucratic rather than economic
mechanisms, the market countries
have steadily increased their
trade. Intra-bloc trade went up
about 65 per cent between 1955
and 1960, and, he believes, "will
continue to. rise quickly in the
future."

C; .

By MICHAEL SATTINGER

The Peace Corps training pro-
gram for Thailand was outlined
last-Sunday night in talks by Prof.
Leestma of the education school
and several Peace Corps volun-
teers.
Prof. Leestma, who accompanied

.......

" ®

""

DIAL 8-6416
Ending Wednesday
"EXCITING,
SUSPENSEFUL
MYSTERY . . . AN
ENGROSSiNG
PSYCHOLOGICAL
DRAMA!"
Masters, Daily News
RECOMMENDED FOR MATURE ADULTS!'
D e
THURSDAY ONLY '
"GIRL OF THE
GOLDEN WEST"

the first group to Thailand, said
that because of the University's
qualifications and interests, the
decision was made to train the
second group here.
The University then set a cur-
riculum and training pattern for
the volunteers.
Two-Fold Training
The 63-members of the pro-
gram are given both a common
core of knowledge and also tech-
nical training in one of the four
specialties: English teaching, vo-
cational agriculture, physical edu-
cation, or medical technology.
The common core consists of
an intensive study of the Thai
language and culture, physical fit-
ness, personal hygiene, and the
philosophy and procedure of the
Peace Corps program.
The program, which occupies 65
hours a week for more than 11
weeks, serves two functions, Prof.
Leestma said. The first is, natur-
ally, to train the volunteers to do
their work effectively.
Also Selective
But the second function is to
act as a selective device, as not
all volunteers are allowed to go
on to Thailand.
After their training is over in
the University program, the vol-
unteers wil spend a month train-
ing in Thailand before beginning
their service. They will probably
live in dormitories, if in Bangkok,
or with a Thai family if in the
provinces.

PROF. GEORGE S. ODIORNE
.. . programming unit
Bureau Gets
NVew Center
A new center for programmed
instruction and teaching machines
has been established in the Bu-
reau of Industrial Relations, to
take over a function formerly han-
dled by a privately-owned firm.
Dean Floyd A. Bond of the busi-
ness administration school and
Prof. George S. Odiorne, director
of the bureau, announced the
move yesterday.
The new center, to be self-sup-
ported by funds from special work-
shops, research and other pro-
grams for industry, is gathering a
library of materials in program-
med instruction, several teaching
machines and other related equip-'
ment.
Shows New Methods
Its main function is to instruct
directors of training from industry
and the business school faculty
in the technology of these new
methods of instruction and learn-
ing.
William Watson, presidept of
the private firm which is moving
to Connecticut, expressed confi-
dence that the initial efforts to
develop workshops for the train-
ing purposes "have found a good
home, and will expand and become
stronger under the University's di-
rection."
Appoint Director
Gary Rummler, '60BAd, will di-
rect the center.
The Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions itself is designed to serve pri-
vate industry. Prof. Odiorne's unit
holds numerous conferences, pub-
lishes periodicals and conducts re-
search.

sponsored by some Detroit Negro
organizations. Representatives Lu-
cien Nidzi and John Dingell face
this campaign. Rep. Charles Diggs
is the area's lone Negro in Con-
gress.
In the Legislature Sen. Carlton
Morris (R-Kalamazoo) faces stiff
primary opposition from Con-Con
delegate Garry Brown (R-Kaia-
mazoo). Several other conserva-
tive and moderate GOP members
face primary fights.
Tax Issue
On the Democratic side Minor-
ity Leader Raymond Dzendzel (D-
Detroit) faces opposition from foes
of the Detroit city income tax
Dzendzel's district encompasses
part of the city and part of the
tax-hit suburbs.
In county convention races
George Romney has placed his
prestige on the line in effort to
defeat Durant in the 14th District
Romney has declared that the
election of Durant, a sponsor of
the John Birch society, "would be
a personal affront."
Democrats Thomas P. Payne of
Ann Arbor and Joseph B. Gasior-
owski of Monroe will battle for
the right to meet incumbent
George Meader (R-Ann Arbor)
for the Second District congres-
sional seat.
Bretton Runs
Prof. Henry Bretton of the po-
litical science department and in-
cumbent Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-
Ann Arbor) willrun unopposed
for the Washtenaw County first
district nominations.
In the Second District, incum-
bent James Warner (R-Ypsilanti)

f
r
t
t

PROF. FREDERIC L. PRYOR
. the other common market

_v. PAGE THREE
Republicans
in Primaries
faces a challenge from Roy Smith
to face Democrat Charles F. Gray
in November.
County Treasurer William F.
Verner faces Sylvester A. Leonard
in the primary. The winner will
- battle Democrat Thomas E. Kaas
for the position.
Other Democrats
Unopposed Democrats are: Van-
zetti M. Hamilton, prosecuting at-
torney; Adeline Drews, county
clerk; Mae Hardenbergh, registrar
of deeds; Richard E. Nash, drain
commissioner; and Edward L.
Jonas, surveyor.
Other Republican hopefuls are:
incumbent William F. Ager, prose-
cuting attorney; incumbent Luella
. M. Smith, county clerk; incum-
bent Patricia N. Hardy, registrar
of deeds; and incumbent Herbert
S. Hicks, surveyor.
Former Member
Of Faculty Dies
Prof. Allen F. Sherzer, a mem-
ber of the mechanical engineering
rdepartment faculty from 1920 un-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
..1r.. ............ . .,.o:::::: :.n:.:J.: .... - .....-i^.:.."".. YI .. ............,f.........

(Continued from Page 2)

eeel

AUGUST 6-18

of the Nigeria West African Examina-
tions Council, Nigeria, Aug. 8-18.
Tadashi Yoshida, Chief of Radio Cul-
ture Division Education Dept. N.H.K.,
Japan, Aug. 11-14.
Iszvo Saito, Specialist in Audio-Visual
Education, Japan, Aug. 11-14.
Mr. & Mrs. Jong-Hyeon, Dean & Pro-
fessor of Accounting Business College,
Pusan National University, Korea, Aug.
11-15.
Events
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Professor
E. M. Uhlenbeck, University of Leiden,
Netherlands, will speak on "An Ap-
praisal of Transformation Theory," on
Thurs., Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Degree Recital: Robert Murray, pian-
ist, will present a recital on Tues.,
Aug. 7, 8:30 p.m., Lane Hall Aud., in
lieu of a thesis for the degree Master
of Music. He will play compositions
by Bach, Chopin, and Beethoven. Open
to the general public.
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Will
hold a meeting Wed., Aug. 8 in the
Student Act. Bldg. It is at 7:30 p.m.
in room 528-D. The speaker will be Rev.
Sunford Morgan.
Opening Tomorrow Night: 8:00 Hill
Aud.: U-M Players, Dept. of Speech and
Opera Dept., School of Music present
opera double bill: Puccini's "Gianni
Schicchi" and Pergolesi's "La Serva Pa-
drona." Performances through Fri. Box
office open today 10-5 at Hill Aud., 10-8
tomorrow htrough Sat. Tonight, tomor-
row: $1.75, 1.25; Fri.: $2.00, 1.50.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
General Motors Styling, Warren, Mich.
-Psychologist-Social Experimental for
supervisory position in survey work. MA
or PhD in Psych. Transportation An-
alyst to prepare complete project analy-
ses, etc. BA in social sciences; pertinent

exper. preferred. Men or WOMEN for
either position.
Corning Glass Works, Corning, N.Y.-
BS in Math plus advanced statistical
work, including probability, for Opera-
tions Research-a corp. staff group en-
gaged in new & expanding activity. Pre-
fer to hire 1 recent grad & 1 grad with
up to five years experience.
Owens-Illinois Technical Center, To-
ledo, O.-Technical Librarian. Man or
WOMAN with Library Science degree &
some courses in Physical Science &
Math at under-grad level. Prefer some
exper. & typing.
Ford Truck Product Division, Dear-
born, Mich.-Administrative Represen-
tative. Involves personnel work. Also, to
make presentations to mgmt. & to auto
industry; some writing involved, for
publicity purposes. BA or MA in Lib'l
Arts or Bus. Admin. Exper. not re-
quired.
Reilly Tar & Chemical Corporation,
Indianapolis, Ind.-Career opportunity
in Production Management. To work on
improvement of operations in all as-
pects, such as instrumentation, proc-
essing methods & materials, yields, spe-
cifications, records, etc. Outstanding
grad. with pertinent educ. to train in
all phases of plant mgmt.
* * *
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Bldg., during the following hours: Mon.
thru Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for partltime or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-To sell fresh frozen crickets. Would
need a car. Full-time for 2 months.

Must know something about fish-
ing.
1-Good commercial artist for news-
paper advertising. Part-time or full-
time.
80--Psychological Subjects. Must be stu-
dents. At least one, 2 hour session.
1-To do heavy work, inside a home,
for an older woman-in exchange
for room. Starting immediately after
summer session gets out.
FEMALE
1-Good commercial artist for news-
paper advertising. Part-time or full-
time.
1-Food supervisor. Degree in dietetics
or equivalent experience. Monday
thru Friday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Linguistics Speech
Features Teeter
Prof. Karl V. Teeter of Harvard
University will speak on "Lexico-
statistics and Genetic Relationship
among Languages" at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rackham :Amphitheatre.
The lecture is under the auspices
of the Summer Session's Program
in Linguistics.
-I-, A
-STARTS TUESDAY-
LONELY ARE THE BRAVE
Kirk Douglas
THE MILLIONAIRESS
Sophia Loren

I _______

w

til 1946, died yesterday morning
at his home in Ann Arbor.
er/ectton a m oadern CGcaalin-
DIAL 5-6290
HELD
OVER! '/.
Meloirdtb W1160n7
* *
."
THE MOST MARVELOUS MOVIE EVER MADE I
FROM THE PLAY THAT KEPT PLAYING FOREVERI
8011 PESO N HR fDHCKER
EINEGSt-6! [ORt) TECHNIRAMA*W
TECHNICOLOR' PRESENTED BY WARNER BROS.
Shows 1:00 - 3:30 - 6:11 - 9:00
Feature 1:00 - 3:38 - 6:25 - 915
Weekday Matinees 1.00
Evenings and Sunday 1.25

OPEIG TOMORROW

2

GREAT

OPERAS-DOUBLE BILL

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPT. OF SPEECH
present
OPERA DEPT., SCHOOL OF MUSI
in

*I

Pq

2-6264 I. .d iilfllii'1

ENDS TODAY
"HEMINGWAY'S
ADVENTURES OF
A YOUNG MAN"

Puccini s

.jit,,1Il1uti11inInfal u -1 I

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Pergolesi's
La Serva Padroi
PERFORMANCES THRU SATURDAY
A nA A A 11E11 AlE 11

na

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