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July 22, 1961 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, JULY' 22,18611

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1961 THE MICHICAN flAILV I3AflP ~

rtf% rj innL' L'

31 ,

Southern Soldiers' Valor
Aided Confederate Image

To the slavery-based Southern
Confederacy, birth and doom
came hand-in-hand. And only the
valor of its soldiers gave respecti-
bility to its unworthy cause and
unity in its defeat.
This analysis came from Prof.
Dwight L. Dumond, of the history
department, in the eighth lecture
commemerating the War Between
the States sponsored by the Sum-
mer Session on Thursday.
Slaveholders never quite estab-
lished a confederacy of slave
states. Prof. Dumond explained,
because "nations are not born in
such fashion; and the rebellion
against federal authority never
DIAL NO 2-6264 y

achieved sufficient maturity, unity,
or respectability to give it na-
tional status."
Possess Some Virtues
The Confederate soldier and
some of his West Point trained
commanders with great bravery
and endurance, however, gave re-
spectibility to an unworthy cause,
a tradition of unity where none
existed, and a respectable name
to a composite of dissent, he said.
Prof. Dumond pointed out that
John C. Calhoun's theories of de-
centralization and local autonomy
were well-suited to break up a
nation but ill-suited for building
one, much less conducting a war.
There was dissension in the slave
states from the first over seces-
sion and economic rivalry.
Many Conflicts
Some slave states furnished
more men to the Union than to
the Confederate armies. Confed-
erate leaders disagreed many
times.
Such conflict "confirms that
popular excitement of 1860-61 in
the slave states had been decep-
tive. There was no war party, and
the people would not have voted
for secession had they anticipated
war," Prof. Dumond said.

a

1 "_
ii

COLOR Reeased thinUnhdAter
SHOWS AT 1:00 - 3:05 - 5:10
7:15 & 9:204-creature 9 Min. Later

PROF. DWIGHT L. DUMOND
... war valor

SKEPTICAL:
Congress
Sets 'Look'
At Corps
The Peace Corps claims it will
cost $40 million for the United
States to have 3,000 volunteers
overseas or ready for assignment
by next July.
The agency plans to ask Con-
gress for the money as part of
legislation to establish the pro-
gram to send Americans abroad
to helptraise living standards in
have-not nations.
Peace Corps officials say they
are prepared for a "hard look"
from a skeptical Congress at their
fund requests.
Face Problems
The agency, which is authorized
to accept contributions from pub-
lic spirited citizens, may face
some very real money problems if
Congress decides to be stingy.For
so far, only $34 has been donated.
It estimates that an average of
$9,180 will be needed to train and
maintain a volunteer abroad for
one year.
Of this amount, $2,900 will be
spent for "indirect overhead cost"
that includes the expenses of the
Washington headquarters and
overseas field ofices, an agency
spokesman said.
Spend $2 Million
The Peace Corps already has
spent nearly $2 million even
though not one volunteer has left
United States soil. Scores are in
training, however, and the first
group of 70 is scheduled to depart
for Ghana early in September.
Others are preparing to do road
survey work in Tanganyika, help
Chile and Colombia develop rural
areas and teach school in the
Philippines.
R. Sargent Shriver, President
John F. Kennedy's brother-in-law
who heads the program, now has
a staff of 203 full-time employes
and 43 temporary workers or part-
time consultants.
Divert Funds
Money diverted from the Mutual
Security Fund has kept the Peace
Corps in business since it was
founded last March 1. About a
quarter-million dollars remain of
the $2 million allocated by the
President to get things started.
Volunteers, who will receive al-
lowances for food and clothing and
get free medical care, will be paid
$75 a month in a lump sum after
they complete their service over-
seas.
A Peace Corps official said 3,-
750 persons would be in training
next summer. This is necessary to
produce 3,000 qualified volunteers
because of the tough weeding-out
process, he said.
MSU Names
New Director
For Center
Michigan State University's La-
bor-Industry Center - criticized
as excessively pro-labor - hasap-
pointed a new assistant director
in charge of personnel manage-.
ment and program services.
Daniel H.CKruger, a former as-
sistant to Center Director Jack.
Stieber, assumed his new duties
yesterday.rHe replaces Charles A.
Rogers, fired last month after his
name appeared in an article that
criticized the "slanted" practices
of the center.

Sen. Lynn 0. Francis Jr. R-
Midland) made the charges. He is
chairing a Senate investigation
into the matter.
MSU Provost Paul A. Miller said
Kruger is well qualified to handle
the management side of the cen-
ter though he has served as Stie-
ber's assistant for only "two or
three years".
Kruger worked "for a short
while" in the management sec-
tion with Rogers in 1957.
"Kruger's work recently has
been chiefly in management and
personnel programs of public
agencies," Miller said. "He has
been giving leadership on per-
sonnel and management programs
to federal and state agencies, in
training and evaluation pro-
grams."
Rogers was fired "for not doing
the job we expected him to do,"
Miller claimed.
Sen. Francis is expected to be-
gin his investigation of the center
next month.

FOR RENT
2 GIRLS wanted in fall to share roomy,
mod. apt. near campus. Call Elaine
Pratt, NO 3-1561, ext. 168. C26
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. 017
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL-Lovely furnished
apartment suitable for four girls.
Perking. Call 2-0671. C66
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fail semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. 016
NOW A VAILABLE -- Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. 09
Ann Arbor's
FINEST
Apartments
at
Mode rate
Rentals
Schedule of Rentals:
Studio...............$98to126
1-Bedroom..............120,to 180
2-Bedroom ............225 to 270
3-Bedroom............270 to 330
(Including heat, water,, Frigi-
daire range and refrigerator,
swimming pool)
Models open 11 am. to 8 p.m. daily
and Sunday. Immediate occupancy.
2200 Fuller Road.
HURON
TOWERS

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
.70
.85
1.00

Figure 5 average words to a line
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Crane Attacks Cars

WORKING HISTORIAN--Prof. Preston W. Slosson works on a
new set of lecture notes. In his 40 years as a University faculty
member, he taught more than 18,000 students. He received
"Thanks" and 'a $10,000 check from one of them yesterday.
Slosson s Teaching Inspires
Former Student's'Thanks'

The V.F.W
presents
THE SENSATIONAL
HARMONIC DONS
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
July 21 and 22
Don't miss this fabulous show!

A retiring University professor'
received "thanks" from one of his
18,000 former students yesterday
with a check for $10,000.
Prof. Preston W. Slosson, a
member of the history department
for 46 years, formally received the
gift from Leo T. Northville, a Chi-
cago attorney who graduated from
the law school in 1932.
Norville said he wished to pro-
vide the money to Prof. Slosson
"as a token of the appreciation
of his many students" taught at
the University.
He presented the check from a
ART:
A nalyzs
Problems
"Don't aim at the moon --the
Russians will beat you there any-
way," Michigan artists were told
Thursday at the University's Re-
gional Art Conference.
"Just be satisfied to sit on your
own clothespost. This is probably
as high as you will climb," James
A. Schwalbach, University of Wis-
consin extension specialist in art
and design, told his audience of
more than 100 painters. Their
work is on exhibit in the Rack-
ham galleries through Aug. 3.
"I would like to suggest that
you decide what is important to
you and then ask you tolive by
it," Schwalbach said. "Seek: a
style and solution to your prob-
lem that is as distinctive to you
as your handwriting but more
meaningful.
Urges Dynamism
"Never be static," he urged.
"Things are always changing.
Your art should reflect the times
in which you live.
"Visit exhibits. See other pic-
tures but go with an open mind.
Be ready both to question and ac-
cept. Change your teachers fairly
frequently. Look particularly for
teachers who upset you.
Sunday Amateur

foundation bearing his name to
the Regents at their June meet-
ing, and came to campus for the
formal presentation at yesterday's
tea in Clements Library. Univer-
sity President Harlan Hatcher and
other administrative officials and
faculty members attended the
presentation.
Norville -said he was inspired by
Prof. Slosson's& lectures between
1927 and 1932. "I was so stim-
ulated that I have been reading
history ever since," he said. He
has bone on to read all the works
of Churchill and Will Durant, and
is presently "completing the mon-
umental tasks of reading Toyn-
bee's works."
Prof. Slosson-whose retirement
furlough began June 30-express-
ed hope that "many deserving
professors will be rewarded sim-
ilarly by their students.
Daughters Take Courses
Norville's two daughters, Nancy,
'61Ed, and Martha, '63, have also
had courses from Prof. Slosson.
One of the University's best
known teachers, Prof. Slosson is
now teaching summer school
classes. He will hold the Eppley
Chair at the Culver Military Acad-
emy next year.
"The gift of Mr. Norville is a
fitting tribute to a brilliant teach-
er," Prof. John Bowditch, chair-
man of the history department,
said. "Prof. Slosson has the kind of
unique personality that cannot be
replaced. He will be sorely missed
when he retires."
Wrote History Texts
Prof. Slosson, who received his
degrees from Columbia University,
has written more than a dozen
history books, many of which are
used as texts throughout the coun-
try,
He served as assistant librarian
of the State Department's Ameri-
ican Commission to Negotiate
Peace during World War L.
Previous to his appointment
here, he taught at Columbia and
was a literary editor of the New
York Independent, 1917 and1920-
21. He has done radio broadcast-
ing since 1941 and at present has
a news commentary program on
WUOM.

NO 3-0800
NO 5-9161

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-35 mm. colored slides in yellow
envelope, Ann St., Hospital area.
Please call NO 3-5381. Reward. A5

C10

PERSONAL
ACADEMIC-MINDED MOTHERS (pets
and spouses prohibited, but offspring
prerequisite) interestedin co-op hous-
ing for fal, please write P.O. Box 466.
79
USED CARS
61 VW BLUE SEDAN delux with radio.
Call 662-9152. N3
REAL ESTATE
INCOME PROPERTY for sale. $1500
down. Student apartments for rent.
Call 5-9114.
RBOR
j SSOC IATES,
REALTORS
303 8. Div. 5-9114 Eves. 3-8424 or 3-0434
R1
BUSINESS SERVICES
Keep cool-shop evenings.at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
MELONS MEATS
SNACKS
KITCHEN UTENSILS
(Ralph's is open every night
till midnight!)
J0
SUMMER TUTORING--beginning and
advanced French. NO 3-9420. J17
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
FOR SALE
$280 Admiral T.V, for e. Blond 17"
console-new pixtube. Will sell for
only $39.00. Call R. Berber, NO 2-5320.
B6
EAST OF WASHTENAW - Vine Wood
area. Excellent location, near elemen-
tary school, junior high. school, and
campus. Three large bedrooms, living
room with fireplace, sun room, gra-
cious separate dining room, large
kitchen with breakfast area. Base-
ment recreation room. Wall-to-wall
carpeting and drapes. Recently re-
decorated. Garage. Immediate occu-
pancy if desired. Under $30,000. Call
NO 3-8221. B11

1fl1.fl D -

SPEC IAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
.58
.70
.83

BARGAIN CORNER
TENNIS RACKETS, bicycles, patio fur-
niture, draperies. THE TREASURE
MART, 529 Detroit Street. NO 2-1363.
Open Monday and Friday nights till
9:00. W1
BARGAIN SALE - Men's wear. Short
sleeve sport shirts 99c and $1.50; wash
'n wear slacks $3.95; knit sport shirts
$1.44 and $2.59; wash 'n wear cord
pants $2.77; many other big buys.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington St. W3
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Servic
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9166
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Oars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
87
HELP WANT ED
EVENING WORK-7 maleeor female)
telephone operators needed to do tele-
phone work for local dry cleaners.
Hours 5 P.M. to 9 P.M. For interview
call NO 2-9546. H13
HAVE SOME FUN, earn some money.
Dancers, singers, acrobats, and so
forth. Phone Mr. Green, VFW Club,
NO 2-3972. H12
FULL AND PART-TIME WORK-Tele-
phone operators needed to do tele-
phone work for local Dry Cleaners.
Experience not necessary. Must have
good voice and personality. For inter-
view call 2-9546. H10

Final Performance Tonight
THEBEDBU G
Vladimir Mayakovsky's biting satire
on Communist Society presented by
The University Players
Box office open all day today.

er eeot t )flern Cohnx

DIAL
5-6290

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN ANN ARBOR
A Film being Held Over for a
Third Week in the Summertime
Dad's Love Affair became a Laugh Affair!

Coming: "RASHOMON"

i

""

"FAN NY"/
Opens next Friday, July 28
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
DE SICA'S
"THE, BICYCLE THIEF"
Lamberto Maggiorani, Enzo Stiaola
No. 3 of Best Films of All Times -
Brussels 1958 poll of 117 film critics from 26 countries
-n a . . f.-r- I E A - A~

I

ENDS 8-6416
TONIGHT _ _DIAL
ABSOLUTELY
STAGGERING
...BRILLIANTr'
STARTIN.Git.NV.DA
STARTING SUNDAY

I

I

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