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July 20, 1961 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-20

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EIREE

THURSDAY, JULY 20,1961

'THE MJCHIGAN DAILY

'PAGE TH

THVILSDAY, JULY 20,1961 'THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAd~I~ TI 1RVW~

a. CsawA:+r i aia a:.u

J I

IN CIVIL WAR:
Displays Whitman Collections

McKeachie Cites Need
For Friendly Teachers

OP-
i

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

By ELAINE CLELAND
The General Library s showing
a display on Walt Whitman and
the Civil War.
The books and manuscripts dis-
played are from the University of
Michigan Library and the private
collection of Charles E. Feinberg.
Includes Photostats
The display includes photostats
of original manuscripts and sev-
Kapas Find,
Food Stolen
Officers of the Kappa Kappa
Gamma Sorority reported that the
house had been entered through a
window and food stolen.
The police also found that a
bed in a basement room had been
slept in, although the occupant
of the room is not in Ann Arbor.
A pie, a box of cereal, five
pounds of cheese and a ,half-gal-
lon of milk were missing from the
house's kitchen.

eral rare first editions of Whit-
man's works.
Rare Book Librarian Miss Har-
riet C. Jameson designed the dis-
play. The collection has been dis-
played in the library for about a
month.
An article on Mr. Feinberg in
"The American Book Collector"
defined him as "the best known
book collector in America." The
article said Mr. Feinberg "has
gradually built an unparalelled
archive of Whitman manuscripts,
editions, association pieces and
contemporary evidence that will
never again be duplicated or even
approximated."
Show First Editions
Featured in the display are first
editions of Whitman's "T h e
Wound Dresser," a series of let-
ters written from the hospitals in
Washington during the War of
the Rebellion, and "Drum Taps."
There is also a first edition of
"Specimen Days," one of the few
copies to be had of this book.
A first edition book of proof
sheets given by Whitman to a good

BARGAIN DAYS
at FOLLETT'S
25% off on KODAK FILM
1 A " St - -T T , /

friend, Horace Traubel, in 1875-
76 is also included. The book con-
tains memoranda written by Whit-
man during the war.
Includes Letter
A photostat is on display of the
first two pages of an eight-page
circular letter to.,Lewis K. Browne
at Armory Equare Hospital, Wash-
ington, and to the wounded sol-
diers that Whitman knew as a
nurse at that hospital.
Located in the display is a
photograph of Peter Doyle, a par-
oled Confederate soldier whom
Whitman met when Doyle was
working as a streetcar conductor
in Washington. A strong friend-
ship grew between these two men
and the letters Whitman wrote to
Doyle were later published as
"Calamus."
Shows Lincoln
One of the last pictures taken
of Abraham Lincoln with a Whit-
man autograph note is included
as well as a letter written by
Whitman in 1863, praising Lincoln.
Several rejected lines from var-
ious Whitman poems are in the
display- along with some original
manuscripts of some of Whit-
man's most famous works.
Art Exhibition
Shows Works
From State
An estimated 170 paintings will
be displayed at the Michigan re-
gional art exhibition and confer-
ence today in the Rackham galler-
ies.
The exhibition which will be
displayed until Aug. 3 represents
more than 70 Michigan communi-
ties. Many of the paintings were
winners in local and regional art
shows.
Prof. James A. Schwalbach of
the University of Wisconsin will
discuss "The Sunday Painter-
Dissected" at 10 a.m. in Rackham
Amphitheatre. Prof. Emil Weddige
of the school of architecture and
design will give an oil painting
demonstration at 2 p.m. in the
Architecture Aud.
Charles Culver of the Detroit
Society of Arts and Crafts Art
School will demonstrate water-
color painting at 3:30 p.m. fol-
lowing Prof. Weddige's demonstra-
tion.
The annual exhibit and the
Street Fair are designed to coin-
cide.

Students do better work for
teachers who are friendly and ap-
proachable, Prof. Wilbert J. Mc-
Keachie of the education school
said yesterday.
Speaking at the 32nd annual
Summer Education Conference,
McKeachie said that the teacher's
warmth or lack of it has particu-
lar influence upon women stu-
dents. He said that this is prob-
ably because "women in our cul-
ture are concerned about relation-
ships with other people."
Uses Word Test
He noted here that studies have
shown that when word tests are
administered, women generally
excel in words related to social
relation, while men have greater
facility with words related to tools.
He also pointed out that warm
and friendly teachers get students
to do more work on their own,
than do teachers who tend to be
cold or distant.
While conceding that the teach-
ers and teaching methods have
various effects on various pupils,
McKeaihie did not approve match-
McKeachie did not approve match-
chines. "In some cases we need to
train our students to learn from
different kinds of teachers. Teach-
ers need to learn to cope with is-
dividual differences in pupils," he
said.
Devices Are Tools
He said that automated devices
can be important tools, but cannot
replace the individual teacher.
"The virtue of the teacher is that
he can change his approach as
he sees how the students react
and adjust his behavior."
McKeachie said the reinforce-
ment of the teacher's response to
the student and interest in his
classroom achievements are some-
thing which the machine cannot
duplicate.,
The individual teacher is also
important as a model, McKeachie
Directors Hold
Second Vote
The Ann Arbor Area United
Fund Board of Directors will vote
for the second time on the ad-.
mission of the Catholic Social
Services of Washtenaw County.
Three months ago the board
declined to admit the agency by
one vote. The issue will again be
voted upon Aug. 3.
The agency has been in Ann Ar-
bor since 1959. It serves children
and adults of varying racial, na-
tional, religious, social and eco-
nomic backgrounds.

said. This is particularly true at
the elementary level. "The degree
to which the teacher becomes a
model depends upon the motiva-
tion of the child and what the
teacher is able to communicate
to the child," he noted.

LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: Woman's watch, vicinity of
Burton Tower. Call 3-2544. A50
LOST-35 mm. colored slides in yellow
envelope, Ann St., Hospital area.
Please call NO 3-5381. Reward. A5
USED CARS
'61 VW BLUE SEDAN delux with radio.
Call 662-9152. N3
PERSONAL
HONEST - The Towers is too sedate
without the Betas, and Rands isn't
nearly as swingln.'-SINCERE Flo1
Read the MICHIGAN DAILY for
Bargain Day Specials
(You can still subscribe to the
summer DAILY for only $1.25!)

LINES
2
3
4

I DAY
.70
.85
1.00

3 DAYS
1.95
2.40
2.5

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

HELP WANT ED

322 South State Street Bob Graham, Mgr.
GRAD MIXER
Friday, July 21,

f
i
i
I
I
i
{
1
_ _

9-12

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

75c Admission

VFW CLUB
on East Liberty
Sponsored by the Grad Student Council

i
i

PROF. WILBERT McKEACHIE
... need individuals
Theater Group.
To Play Here
The Stratford Festival Theatre
will present the "Pirates of Pen-
zance" at the Michigan Theatre
Nov. 29.
The Gilbert and Sullivan Oper-
etta will be directed by Tyrone
Guthrie. The Ontario group will
use the scenery and lighting ef-
fecs of its original productions.
The Stratford orchestra will ac-
company the players.
-DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
levels-needed to assist in comprehen-
sive study of water resource & water
pollution in Chicago area and Great
Lakes. Salary grades GS-5 to GS-12.
Michigan Civil Service-Latest Bi-
monthly listing of current openings
now on file at 3200 SAB, GCn'l. Div.
Owens-Illinois, Toledo, Ohio-Techni-
cal and non-technical openings for
grads-all degrees-in Pus. Ad., Engrg.
(ME, EE), Math., Lib'l Arts, Physics.
Some positions require specialized ex-
perience.
Walker Manufacturing Co., Jackson,
Mich.-Project Engineer-BS in ME, EE,
or CE. Automotive background, mini-
mum 3 yrs. experience required. Firm
manufactures automotive exhaust sys-
tems.
Please contact Bureau of Appoint-
ments, General Division, 3200 SAB, Ext.
3544 for further details.
Part-Timne
Finpioyment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications can be made in
2200 SAB Monday through Friday, 8:00
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of. hiring part-
time or temporary employes should con-
tact Jack Lardie at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Rm. 2200, daily.
MALE
2-Salesmen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
56-Psychological subjects, several one
hour experiments.
2-Salesmen, commission basis, must
have car.
1-Married couple, no children, be-
tween 25-30 years of age, to super-
vise children, live in, premanent
position.
FEMALE
1-Married couple, no children, be-
tween 25-30 years of age, to super-
vise children, live in, permanent
position.
15-Psychological subjects, several one
hour experiments.
3-Saleswomen,mselling magazine sub-
scriptions.

ACADEMIC-MINDED MOTHERS (pets
and spouses prohibited, but offspring
prerequisite) interested'in co-op hous-
ing for fall, please write P.O. Box 466.
F9
FOR RENT
ONE 2-ROOM APT. with bath, private
parking, and automatic washer and
dryer available July 19. 1-room effi-
ciency apt, completely furnished. 2
other furnished apts. available for
fall. 1921 E. Huron. Call at back
basement door. NO 5-4767. C24
CAMPUS Furnished Apartment. $50 per
month, summer only. NO 3-4322. C19
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL-Lovely furnished
apartment suitable for four girls.
Parking. Call 2-0671. C66
3-ROOM furnished apt. near Packard
and State. $70 for summer months.
NO 3-8458. C20
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fall semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. C16
NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. 09
Ann Arbor's
FINEST
Apartments
at
Moderate
RentalIs
Schedule of Rentals:
Studio ..................$ 98 to 126
1-Bedroom .............. 120 to 180
2-Bedroom .............. 225 to 270
3-Bedroom..............270 to 330
(Including heat, water, Frigi-
daire range and refrigerator,
swimming pool)
Models open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
and Sunday. Immediate occupancy.
2200 Fuller Road.
HURON
TOWERS

HAVE SOME FUN, earn some money.
Dancers, singers, acrobats, and so
forth. Phone Mr. Green, VFW Club,
NO 2-3972. H12
FULL AND PART-TIME WORK-Tele-
phone operators needed to do tele-
phone work for local Dry Cleaners.
Experience notonecessary. Must have
good voice and personality. For inter-
view call 2-9546. H10
MEN
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
AFTERNOONS & EVENINGS
1. Must be neat-appearing
2. Above-average intelligence
3. Able to converse intelligently
WAGES TO BE DISCUSSED
AT INTERVIEW

BARGAIN CORNER
A CONSIGNMENT SHOP for furniture,
dishes, baby items, rugs, what-have-
you. The Treasure Mart, 529 Detroit
St., NO 2-1363, Open Monday and Fri-
day nights till 9.00. W1
BARGAIN SALE - Men's wear. Short
sleeve sport shirts 99c and $1.50; wash
'n wear slacks $3.95; knit sport shirts
$1.44 and $2.59; wash 'n wear cord
pants $2.77; many other big buys.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington St. W3
TRANSPORTATION
Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday
$12.00 plus 8c a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
j TRUCKS AVAI LABLE

CALL MR. NEUMANN
NO 3-6003 9 A.M.-2 P.M.
H9
FOR SALE
EAST OF WASHTENAW - Vine Wood
area. Excellent location, near elemen-
tary school, junior high school, and
campus. Three large bedrooms, living
room with fireplace, sun room, gra-
cious separate dining room, large
kitchen with breakfast area. Base-
ment recreation room. Wall-to-wall
carpeting and drapes. Recently re-
decorated. Garage. Immediate occu-
pancy if desired. Under $30,000. Cali
NO 3-8221. Bl
BUSINESS SERVICES
SUMMER TUTORING-beginning and
advanced French. NO 3-9420. J17
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
RIDING LESSONS
Horseback riding. English equipment.
Horses boarded and trained. Herbell
Farm, 4715 E. Joy Road. Phone NO
3-7708. Lloyd Givens, manager-trainer.
J16
SWEET CHERRIES
By the quart or by the pound, pitted.
Also starting the 17th, Mdntmorency
cherries, washed, pitted and sugared.
HURON FARMS
4674 E. Huron River Dr. NO 8-7808
J15
TOO DARN HOT?
RALPH'S MARKET has
cool watermelon
fresh fruit
ice-cold pop
salad fixings
ice cream
Shop evenings, if you like, at
709 PACIKARD
Ralph's is open every night till 12! JO
COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING
To Please You ! !
" Outstanding Personnel
* 10 Barbers a
* Air-Conditioned
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

TON IGHT
Vladimir
Maya kovsky's
satire on Communism
THE
BUG

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORII

C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it.",
1220 South University
NO 8-9168

ES

1

m

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
CinemaqUld4
presents
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
THE BICYCLE THIEF

I

NO 3-0800
NO 5-9161

C10 I

On occasion, brilliant photog-
raphy or local color may dimin-
ish our awareness of a film's
weak plot, flimsy characteriza-
tions or lack of significance. In
part, this was the case with
The Golden Demon. But no
matter how brilliant the tech-
nique or n3Yel the attitude
films of this kind will not long
'receive our support if in the
end they do not serve to make
the human condition more un-
derstandable.
Neorealism, the movement
born in post-war Italy, could
have died- in the ruins' and
slums that it recorded so faith-
fully, but it did not. It lived and
flourished for more than a dec-
ade after Roberto Rossellini's
Open City, which became the
model for the movement, por-
trayed the fear, pain, and death
suffered under Fascist domina-
tion by the Italian "man in the
street." It lived and flourished
primarily because the men who
made these films-Rossellini, de
Sica and Zavattini, Fellini,
Zampa and others-knew that
art must reveal man in his in-
exhaustable variety, not art in
its. And in turn, the heart and
spirit, the dignity and weak-
nesses of men gave life and lon-
gevity to their films. Director L.
A. Bardem, whose Calle Major
(The Lovemaker) will be shown
next semester by Cinema Guild,
calls the appearance of the neo-
realist movement the most im-
portant event in modern film
history because it was "a breath
of fresh air in the rarefied at-
mosphere of the film world;
and it has clearly shown that
the real protagonist of every
film is, and should be, Man."
Of all the neorealist pictures,
none received more acclaim
than Vittorio de Sica's The Bi-
cycle Thief. In his attempt to

movie business.* Abandoning
the studio and its props for the
streets of poverty ridden and
war-scarred Rome, de Sica and
screenwriter Zavattini created
a film which John Mason
Brown describes as "high and
bleak in its beauty, and irresti-
ble in its force." It is the story
of a child, older than his years,
the father he idolizes and the
bicycle which comes to repre-
sent not only the eternal hope
for a better life but survival it-
self. The heart of the film is
the intense relationship be-
tween this desperate father in
search of his stolen bicycle and
his sensitive but stoic son who
comes to understand that hu-
man idols have weaknesses and
that "human life is everywhere
a state in which much is to be
endured, and little to be en-
joyed.
* After his three months (he
made one thousand dollars)
with de Sica, Maggiorani, who
for sixteen years had been a
steelworker, returned to his old
job. Soon after, however, the
factory laid off 350 workers and
Maggiorani was fired because
his fellow workers felt that
since he had made "millions"
some needy person should have
his position. Maggiorani re-
turned to the movies and was
given a minor role which lasted
17 days. This money and his
"millions" slowly disappeared
and he was evicted from his
apartment just as he found a
job as a bricklayer. In Decem-
ber, 1949, The Bicycle Thief
opened in New York and Bar-
rett McGurn of the New York
Herald Tribune became inter-
ested and wired de Sica sug-
gesting that he give him a job.
De Sica considered giving Mag-
giorani a jcb as a prop man

Ii

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GR IN N ELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily

U-M Players
8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre

-

BARGAIN DAY,

Classified

Ads

Organization
Notices 1

I1

1<a
r, 1K.

I

tn
Cinemta id
Tonight, Friday and Saturday
at 7 and 9
DE SICA'S
""THE BICYCLE THIEF"
Lamberto Maggiorani, Enzo Stiaola
No. 3 of Best Films of All Times -
Brussels 1958 poll of 117 film critics from 26 countries
"Best film in 30 years"-TIME

Baha'i Student Group, weekly meet-
ing, "Joyfulness, a Prerequisite," July
21, 8 p.m., 418 Lawrence.
The Sailing Club will meet at 7:45
p.m. today in 311 W. Engineering. Mo-
vies and shore school will follow the
regular business meeting,

NEW
Miniature Golf
OPENS
SATURDAY
- PAT'S PAR-3-
on U.S.23-South of Packard Rd.

I

art

continues
thru Friday
ON FOREST
opp. Campus Theater-
right around the corner
from the street Art Display.

MORE AND BIGGER SAVINGS
in every department. An astounding array
of Bargains for you - Prices pared down on
DRESSES - COATS -HOSIERY
HANDBAGS - HATS - GIRDLES
BRAS- JEWELRY

*I% r
Uk2OP IEIP! ,'A,&ca ,,ht -"

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