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July 19, 1961 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-19

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WEDNESDAY', JULY 19, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAt' E BEVEN

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1961 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAIV MKV1l~1%i1

V AJ 7 A;Wl

Mantle Homers Twice To Pace Yankee Win

RECORD

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Mickey Mantle
smashed two home runs last night
to tie teammate Roger Maris for
the American League lead and
power the New York Yankees to
a 5-3tvictory over the Washington
Senators.
Mantle and Maris - the latter
hitless in four trips last night -
each have 35 homers.
Mantle batted lefthanded all the
way last night. He clobbered his
first home run with Bobby Rich-
ardson aboard in the first inning.
Mantle struck out his next time
up, stopping his streak of getting
on base against Washington pit-
chers at 10. He .reached base nine
straight times in the previous two
games between the two clubs.

Luis Arroyo, the Yankees' star
reliefer, pitched the last three in-
nings to win his fifth against
three losses. Roland Sheldon start-
ed and gave up three runs and
seven hits. Joe McClain, Wash-
ington's rookie righthander, lost
his ninth against seven victories.
Mantle upped the lead to 4-2 in
the eighth with a mightly blast
over the scoreboard in right-
centerfield, also with two out and
the count 3 and 2. The Yankees
added an insurance run in the
ninth off Marty Kutyna on singles
by Howard, Billy Gardner and
Richardson.
* * *
White Sox 4, A's 3
CHICAGO - Nellie Fox, com-
ing out of a prolonged slump with
two hits, slapped out a two-run
triple in the seventh inning to
help the Chicago White Sox score
a 4-3 victory over the Kansas City
Athletics.
Jaun Pizzaro went the distance
for the Sox and pitched excellent
ball after overcoming a spurt of
wildness in the first inning. Piz-
zaro also worked himself out of
a .bases-loaded jam in the ninth
with one out.
The A's grabbed a 2-0 lead in
the opening inning on ,a pair of
walks 'sandwiched around Gene
Stephens' single, an infield out
and a sacrifice fly. They added
their final run in the fourth on
Jerry Lumpe's double and Wayne
Causey's single.
Luis Aparicio scored for Chicago
in the first when he singled, took
second on a wild pitch and came
home on a pair of infieldground
outs. The Sox picked up another
run in the sixth on Sherm Lollar's
seventh homer and finally took
the lead on Fox's triple after Jim
Landis and Minnie Minoso had
singled.
* * *
Red Sox 9, Indians 2
CLEVELAND - Gary Gieger
belted a pair of home runs and

drove in four runs to power the
Boston Red Sox to a 9-2 victory
over the Cleveland Indians.
Rookie Don Schwall (9-2) scat-
tered ten hits to win.
Centerfielder Gieger's two-run
homer in the first inning, off loser
Jim (Mudcat) Grant (8-4), scored
Chuck Schilling, who had singled.
Gieger's 13th roundtripper in
the fourth again scored Schilling,
who had beat out a hit.
* * *
DETROIT - Jim Gentile slam-
med a 3-2 pitch into the upper
right field seats and gave the
Baltimore Orioles an 8-7 10th in-
ning triumph that knocked the
Detroit Tigers out of first place
in the American League.
Gentile's home run was his 23rd

and followed a disputed foul ball
that would have been the third
strike on him. Plate umpire Bill
Kinnamon ruled a tap at the
plate was fair and Gentile was
tossed out at first base. But third
base umpire John Flaherty quickly
signaled Kinnamon that the ball
was foul. Gentile made the most
of his second chance.
The Detroit defeat, coupled with
New York's 5-3 victory over Wash-
ington, put the Yankees in first
place by 11 percentage points.
* * *

nesota Twins by defeating them
4-1.
Rookie righthander Ken Mc-
Bride went the distance for the
Angels and picked up his fourth
straight victory, striking out 11.
McBride, now 9-5, has pitched
twice the number turned in by
the rest of the Angel staff com-
bined.
Pedro Ramos, who fanned 10,
worked seven innings for the
Twins and gave up only four hits,
but was troubled by an old buga-
boo-the home run ball.

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ALL THE GREAT ARTISTS ON LPs REGULAR AND STEREO
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13ravesp Rd
InSlug fest,_1-
By The Associated Press I
ByNCINNAT-ThhaeMilruss eIn the third, there were only three
CINCINNATI - The Milwaukee hits but there was a walk and
Braves slashed Cincinnati's Na- wild pitches.
tional League lead to 312 games The Reds used six pitchers, with
last night as they drubbed the starter Jim O'Toole taking the
Reds for the second straight time, blame for the defeat to make his
12-8, in a game that had all the record 8-8. Lew Burdette, the third
aspects of sandlot baseball. Milwaukee pitcher, was credited
The game dragged on for three with the victory for a 10-6 mark.
,hours and 25 minutes. There were * *
10 walks, two wild pitches, a balk Cards 8-7, Cubs 3-5
and the Braves even stole five ST. LOUIS - Bill White belted
bases in one inning. a home run, two singles, two
That came in the sixth when triples and a double, in helping
Hank Aaron and Joe Adcock the St. Louis Cardinals to a
executed a double steal and then, double-header sweep over the
after Joe Torre walked, the three Chicago Cubs and himself to a
of them pulled a triple steal. tie with a 49-year-old major
The Braves batted around in league batting record. The scores
both the second and third in- were 8-3 and 7-5.
nings as they built up a fat 9-2 The record, held by the late Ty
lead. In the second they used five Cobb, was for hits in consecutive
singles and a walk for four runs. double-headers. It stands at 14.

MICKEY MANTLE
... tied with Marls

CONTRO VERSIAL:
New Rule Favors Hitters

a

By DAVE KIMBALL
Sports Editor
Baseball, despite the- legal opin-
ion to the contrary, is a business
to the players who don the rosters
of the twenty major league teams.
It takes an extremely high de-
gree of athletic ability and profes-
sional skill to become a major
leaguer, for which the participants
are paid well.
However, once the status of ma-
jor leaguer is attained, it is some-
times .just as hard to stay in as it
was to break into the big time.
Never-Ending
Within a game, there is a never-
ending battle between hitter and
pitcher. The pitcher is paid to
retire hitters with a fair degree of
regularity, allowing as few runs
and hits as possible during the
course of the game, while the bat-
ter is paid to collect hits and score
and knock in runs. If either should
fail to do his job properly, he
would naturally be out of work.
It is because of this constant
battle within a battle that the
dust-off or brush-back pitch, was
devised by major league hurlers.
Until recently this pitch caused
little stir or trouble on the playing
field. Some of the less-informed
fans didn't even know it existed,
thinking that whenever a batter
was forced to hit the dirt by a
close pitch, it was just a wild pitch
on the hurler's part.
Rule Adopted
However, following a rash of
arguments, a few fights, and some
controversy on the subject, the
major leagues adopted a rule
whereby a pitcher believed bythe
umpire to be throwing at a hitter
is given a warning by the aribter.
Along with the warning goes an
automatic $50 fine.
Although the instigators, of the
rule had nothing but good inten-
tions, it leaves much to be desired.
The main drawback, of course,
is that the umpire, no matter how
blessed he may be with experience
and foresight, can never really
determine whether a pitcher is
throwing at a batter, is dusting
him off, or is just plain wild. Al-
though they are expected to be
perfectionists in the eyes of play-
ers, managers, and fans alike, the
men in blue cannot, and should
not, be expected to be mind read-
ers as well.
Dangerous?
When adopting the rule, the
rules-makers were, in effect, try-
ing to abolish the brush-back
pitch, contending that it is un-
necessary as well as dangerous.
Is it dangerous?
Is ducking away from a close
pitch more dangerous than sliding
into third base where there is the
possibility of a broken leg? Is it
more dangerous than trying to
complete a double play while at
the same time the runner, spikes
high, is trying to break it up? Is
it mnrei n-pniio. th an "climbing-

a

The majority of the major leag-
uers do not mind the dust-off
pitch. They take it with a grain of
salt, saying "it's all a part of the
game. Only in rare -cases does a
hitter retaliate at being dusted off,
and only then does the pitch get
any publicity.
Faces Problems
A recent incident in Los Angeles
describes well the problems the
major, leagues are 'facing today
with this rule.
Cincinnati and Los Angeles were
engaged in'a crucial four game
series just before the All-Star
break. The league-leading Reds
had taken two of the first three
and were leading the second place
Dodgers by four full games at the
time.
Dodger hurler Don Drysdale, a
fire-balling righthander with a
whip-like delivery, was facing
Redleg slugging star Frank Robin-
son. Drysdale threw a high, tight
fast ball and plate umpire Dusty
Boggess waved the magic finger
at the 6'6" hurler, automatically
invoking the warning, and the $50
subtraction from his next pay
check. On the next pitch Drysdale
hit Robinson. Boggess immediately
ejected the pitcher from the game.
No one knows whether or not
Drysdale actually threw at the
Redleg slugger. The Dodger hurler
naturally claimed he didn't.
However, a good indication that
the incident was an accident may'
be shown by the statistics. Robin-
son, a notorious plate-crowder, is
leading the league in being hit by
pitchers (he was hit in the All-

Star game by knuckleballer Hoyt
Wilhelm); Drysdale, a notorious
streak pitcher, is leading the
league in hit-batsmen.
No Telling
There was, then, no way to tell-
ing whether or not the two pitches
were intentional or not. So why
give the batter the benefit of the
doubt?
Drysdale's ejection was the first
under the new ruling, but several
warnings have been issued.
Organized baseball is only a few
years away from its centennial
and many of the rules that exist
now were devised during the early
years of the sport. When a rule
is added nowadays it is usually
very worthwhile (the infield fly
rule is a good example of this).
However, the brush-back rule has
been a -definite goof on the part
of the rules committee and should,
for the protection of pitchers as
well as for the good of baseball in
general, be abolished at the earli-
est possible opportunity.

Fi

1;

open Wednesday until 8:30 P.M.

KEN BOYER
... paces win

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