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July 19, 1961 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-19

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, Ml

'" v,

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1961

I

U.S. Cindermen Leading Germans

BITTER ENEMIES:
Cobb Helped Rival
Into Hall of Fame

.4

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We
do
it
Aga in!

STUTTGART, Germany (W)-
The United States squeezed
through to six victories in the first
ten events yesterday in the first
session of a dual meet against an
unexpectedly strong West German
team.
The American men, who de-
feated the Russians Saturday and
Sunday, won the 100-meter hur-
dles, the 400-meters, the 100 me-
ters dash, the 400-meter relay, the
discus and the pole vault for a 56-
50 lead after ten events in the 20
event meet.
They scored 1-2 sweeps in the
hurdles, dash, discus and pole
vault. But the West Germans gave
the crowd of 45,000 in theNeck-
ar Stadium something to cheer
about by sweeping 1-2 in the 800-
meters, 5,000 meters and the ham-
mer throw. and winning the hop,
step and jump.
Iron Man
Hayes Jones of Pontiac, Mich.,
was the iron man of the United
States team. He won the 110-me-
ter hurdles, his specialty, in
:13.8, handled the first leg of the
relay and pulled down a second
in the 100 behind FrankBudd of
Villanova.

Earl Young of Abilene Chris-
tian captured the 400 in :46.5.
The relay quintet with Budd,
Chuck Frazier, and Earl Young
handling the baton behind Jones,
won in 39.9 seconds. Budd whip-
ped to a 10.4 seconds victory in
the 100 meters.
Jay Silvester of Trementon,
Utah, captured the discus throw
with a heave of 189 feet, 3 inches,
and Henry Wadsworth of Miami
won the pole vaule, soaring 15-1.
Dead Heat
Germany won the 5,000 meters
when Horst Flossbach and Rolland
Watschke finished in a dead heat
in 14:08.6. Hans Wulf captured
the hammer with a 195 feet, 10
inch toss; Paul Schmidt won a
slow 800 meters in 1:51.3, and the
hop, step and jump went to Ger-
many when Joerge Wischmeyer
got off a leap of 50 feet, 9% in-
ches.
"I don't know how to explain
the fact that we didn't do bet-
ter," said U.S. Coach Jumbo Jim
Elliott, "except that the boys
probably were a little tired after
our meet in Moscow and the plane
ride here.
"Then too, it is difficult to keep

the team in high gear for two
meets in so short a period of time.
But I am confident after a good
night's sleep the boys will do bet-
ter tomorrow."
The 800 meters was the biggest
upset. Schmidt overhauled Jim
Dupree of Los Angeles in the home
stretch to win going away. Joerg
clocked in identical 1:51.5.
Jimn Beatty of Santa Clara, who
won the 1,500 meters in the meet
in Moscow, was a distant fourth.
He replaced Jerry Siebert, the
Moscow 800 victor, who was ill.
Young captured the 400 in a
swift 46.5 seconds, but he was
pushed all the way by Manfred
Kinder, who was fifth in the 400
in the 1960 Olympics. Kinder fin-
ished in :46.7. Johannes Kaiser
beat out Adolph Plummer of New
Mexico for third.
Almost Beaten
Later, Young had his troubles
hanging on him to win the relay.
Frazier, a Compton, Calif., teen-
ager, gave him a lead of at least
two yards, but at the end Man-
fred Germar was closing in fast.
Had it gone a couple of more
yards, Germar would have nabbed
him.

Germar, who was Germany's
premier sprinter three years ago
before Armin Hary arrived on the
scene, gave Jones a good fight for
the runner-up spot to Budd in
the 100 and was beaten by inches.
Both Jones and Germar were tim-
ed in :10.5.
No Trouble
Jones had no trouble winning
the hurdles. He was in front from
the first stride. Fran Washington
of North Sacramento, Calif., was
second in :14.3.
Another disappointment to El-
liott was the showing of John
Uelses, who won the pole vault in
Moscow. Only the fact that the
West Germans were unable to
find a vaulter who could do bet-
ter than 14 feet, 5 inches, enabled
the United States to go 1-2. Uelses,
who was born in Berlin, was sec-
ond to Wadsworth with a vault of
14-9.
Bob Humphdreys of Long Beach,
Calif., teamed with Silvester for
the discus sweep. He got off a
174-6 toss, far better than the top
West German, Jens Reimers, who
had a 165-7%2 throw.

A

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44

SAN FRANCISCO (W-Ty Cobb
and Sam (Wahoo) Crawford were
such bitter enemies when they
played in the outfield for the De-
troit Tigers that for years they
wouldn't speak to each other. But
Cobb secretly worked hard behind
the scenes to get Crawford with
him into Cooperstown's Hall of
Fame.
Yesterday, Jack McDonald, of
the News-Call Bulletin, told about
it-saying Cobb agreed he could
after the Georgia Peach had died.
Wrote McDonald:
Early one morning in February,;
1957, we answered the phone.
"Did you hear what happened?"
It was the excited voice of Ty,,
calling from his home in nearby
Atherton. We figured his Coca-
Cola stock, in which he had mil-
lions invested, must have jumped
a couple of points.
"He made. He made it," Ty
blurted out. Who made what?
"Crawford. Old Wahoo Sam. He
Just made the Hall of Fame."
Nobody, including Crawford
himself, could have been more
elated about it than Ty. We know.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L P'ct. GB
New York 58 30 .659 -
Detroit 59 32 .648
Baltimore 50 41 .549 9%
Cleveland 49 431.533 11
Chicago 46 47 AM9 14%
Boston 44 48 .478916
Washington 40,.50. 4419
Los Angeles 38 53 .418 21%
Minnesota 37 53 .411 22
Kansas City 33 57 .367 26
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 8," Detroit 7 (10 Inn.)
New York 5, Washington 3
Boston 9, Cleveland 2
Chicago 4, Kansas City
Los Angeles 4, Minnesota 1
TODAY'S GAMES
New York (Downing 0-0 and Terry
5-1) at Washington (Daniels 4-5
and Donovan 5-8) (2).(t-n)
Boston (Conley 4-7 and Wood 0-0)
at Cleveland (Latman 8-0 and
Perry 7-7) (2) (t-n)
Minnesota (Pascual 7-12. and Kra-
lick 9-3) at Los Angeles (Grba
5-9 and Bowfield 5-3) (2) (t-n)
Baltimore (Fisher 2-8) at Detroit
Bunning 10-6) (n)
Kansas City (Shaw 5-8) at Chicago
Herbert 7-8) (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
.W L. Pet. GB
Cincinnati 6 34 .622 -
Los Angeles 52 37 .584 3%
San Francisco 47 41 .534 8
Pittsburgh 43 39 .524 9
Milwaukee 41. 42 A94 11%
St. Louis 42 4S .483 12
Chicago 38 50 .425 17
Philadelphia 26 57 .313 26%
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 8-7, Chicago 3-5
Milwaukee 12, Cincinnati &
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Milwaukee.( Wiley 3-3 and Buhl 5-8)
at Philadelphia (Mahaffey 7-11
and Ferrarese 1-5) (2) (t-n)
Chicago (Ellsworth 5-6) at Pitts-
burgh (Gibbon 7-4) (n)
Los Angeles (P'odres 10-2) at Cini-
cinnati (Purkey 11-4) (ni)
San Francisco (McCormick 8-9) at
St. Louis (Sadecki 7-5) (n)

Why? Ty and Sam had been bit-
ter enemies as teammates on the
Detroit Tigers. They hadn't spok-
en to each other in years in this
long-standing feud.
"Because he merits Hall of
Fame recognition," Cobb would ar-
gue ...
"Look at the man's record," Ty
would say. "He made the majors
in his first year in organized ball
. . . with the rabbit ball they're
playing with today he'd have been
one of the greatest home hitters
of all time . .. Wahoo Sam (nam-
ed after his home town of Wa-
hoo, Neb.) was a big, burly guy
but he stole 41 bases one season."
Banks Fine,
Ready To70o
CHICAGO (P) - Ernie Banks of
the Chicago Cubs yesterday issued
a statement that he feels fine and
is ready to play baseball.
Banks was called to Chicago by
owner P. K. Wrigley to determine
what is wrong with the slugging
shortstop.
He was benched'by head coach
Elvin Tappe in Cincinnati Sun-
day presumably because of trouble
with his left eye. Banks has had
difficulties with his left knee.
Banks, in the hands of several
doctors, said "I feel fine. I'll go
by the doctors' decisions. I feel
like I could play tomorrow."
Banks reportedly has muscular
trouble with his left eye which
affects his depth perception.
Wrigley said he hopes Banks
is around as long as he can stand
up and "I wouldn't trade him for
a billion dollars." Wrigley said the
only thing he doesn't like about.
Banks is the slugger's refusal to
complain when something is
wrong.
it is highly possible that Banks
will rejoin the club in Pittsburgh
tonight.
SAN FRANCISCO-Willie Mays'
estranged wife took firm excep-
tion yesterday to a report that
she pays $400 for shoes.
"I've never seen a pair for $400,"
said Mrs. Marghuerite Mays who
has sued the star centerfielder of
the San Francisco Giants for
separate maintenance.
"They'd have to be solid gold."
Monday, after a preliminary
court hearing on the case, Mays'
lawyer, Bergen Van Brunt, said
Mays had little to show for earn-
ing $100,000 in a year. He was
quoted as saying that Mrs. Mays
had a penchant for $400 shoes and
$8,000 minks.
$I don't think I could walk in
a pair of $400 shoes," Mrs. Mays
told newsmen. "I'd be afraid to.
It's underestimating my Intelli-
gence to say I buy them."

I

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4

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age during the

year.

Their gratitude is shown by the

White & Colored

Now
2 for 5.95

Huge Savings you witness throughout town.

Straw Hats Swim-Trunks
5.00 to 7.95
20% off Now 3.95
SPORT SHIRTS
Knitted -Short-Sleeve
3.95 to 5.95 Now 2.95 each
7.95 to 8.95 Now 4.95 each
BATH ROBES NECKWEAR
20% OFFFormerly to 2.50
BAH OBF Now 2 for $1.55
HOLEPROOF HOSIERY

A

SHOP in ANN, ARBOR and SAVE !

I

Use the Michigan Daily

as Your Buying Guide

9' ,

1.00& 1.50...

Now 2 for 1.25

Sport Shirts
Reg. Long Sleeve
5.95 to 6.95
NOW
395
NOTICE

Sport Coats
(Two Groups)
No. I formerly to 45.00
Now 24.95
No. 11 formerly to 37.50
Now 17.95

Pani Own
SEMi-ANNUAL CLEARANCE
All items selected for this sole are from our regular stock of the finest imported and domestic merchandise.
Your early shopping will assure you of a maximum choice.
Tailored Bermudas Dress Shirts SPORT SHIRTS
WeeNow ee Now
Were Now (Long and Short Sleeves) W N4.
7.95 to 8.95 ...... 5.95 were 5.soto 8.95 3.95to 4.95 295
9.50to 10.95 . . . . . 7.95 Now 4.65 5.-to 5.95 3.9
11.50to 12.50 . . . . . 8.95 3 for 13.50 6.50to 6.95 . - - - - 4.95
13.50 to 1500 " 9.95 Priced for quick clearance 7.50 to 8.95 . . ." . . 5.95
Swim Suits, Hose, Belts, Pajamas, 7.95
16.50 to 18.50 . . .10.95 Straw Hats, Neckwear, etc. 10.00 to 15.95
Light and Regular Weight Clothing
SUITS
____________________Were S ISNow
WASH SUITS 55.00 ....... 4400 SPORT COATS
/1 "S S65.00 ." .....52.00
Were Now 79.50...:. 4.00 20% to 50% off
39.95 . " ".."29.95 82.50 . . .. .66.00
45.00 . . "."" 35.95 85.00 . . . . 68.00
All sizes including extra longs 95.00 . . . . . . . . 76.00 Special
100.00 . . - - . . - - 80 00 I D A M D A
110.00 . . . . . . . . 88.00 INDIA MADRAS
115.00 . . . . . . . . 92.00 19.50
125.00 . . . . . . . . 100.00 were35.00

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4

ALL TROPICAL SUITS,
ENTIRE SELECTION

39.95

to 89.50

NOW 25% OFF
Special SUIT SALE
One large group formerly
priced to 85.00 Now 29.95
1/2 off Rack -Knit Vests

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