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July 19, 1961 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1961-07-19

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PAGE, TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1961

L

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. JULY iq. i~ii1

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DIAL NO 5-6290
The Parent Trap' mnust go
down as one of the funniest, if
not the funniest, picture of the
year ...this movie was given an
enormous advance ballyhoo. The
result certainly lives up to and
surpasses the publicity."
-Michael Burns
Michigan Daily
f WALT
1DISNEV

Donald Hall Tells How Poets Emerge

Outgoing City Postmaster
Condemns 'spoils System'

By NAN MARKEL
Daily Guest Writer
The one young writer whom
even Time proclaims "has poet
written all over him" told me in
his Haven Hall office a few days
ago how a poet emerges.
The sign of promise in a young
writer is interest in technique,
Donald Hall said.
"The imagination and the dis-
crimination must be equal, and
equally as strong," he wrote re-
cently in the Virginia Quarterly
Review. Because the older you
grow the less powerful you realize
your will is, you can only learn
control when you're young. "Reli-
ance on the will is a young thing."
Few Learn Techniques
"Only a few in each generation
learn technique," the 33-year-old
poet said. "Of those few only some
will reach profundity." And how
does one find profundity? "It
comes if it comes."
Hall's speech had the flow and
precision of poetry, and he took
care to say only what is interest-
ing.
I sat in an old cushioned chair,
I

which isn't out of place in his grey ?
cement office, aware that this as-
sistant professor of English at the
University is becoming an emi-
nent writer. His poems were rec-
ognized at Harvard, then at Ox-
ford; he has authorized two books
and edited two others; and his
poems, articles and reviews have
found print in magazines ranging
from Mademoiselle to Poetry.
Conscious of Stature
He was conscious of his poetic
stature, but he looked into his art's
movement more personally than a
self-styled authority would.
"With me there's been a gradual
shift from emphasis on the will
to letting it come. Of course, thereI
is still a residue of control," he
said.
He started writing when he was
about 12, "seriously when I was
about 14." His early decisionrto
devote himself to writing great
poetry "is not typical." Although
he worked with prose for a while,'
he "gave it up soon."
Tried Free Verse
The verse he employed was
"free" at first, then "got very for-
mal metrically when I was about
16. It began to break up at about
25, and now I am writing free
verse again, or more properly, int
syllabics (counting the number of1
syllables rather than the meter)."
What makes a poet of a man?l
"The mind of a poet is not dif-
ferent initially from other men's
minds," he said. "Poets have littlef
in common but a training from<

He pursued this tangent for a
minute, noting that at one stage-
children toy with words. However,
"one kind of bad poet is the per- j
son who has no consideration for1
content," only for the words.
An idea has to lead to another,
and another from that association. ,
This is the form of modern poetry
(stream-of - consciousness writing
is the ultimate in association). But
idea association was imperative1
even for the older poets, although
they foreshadowed their thoughts
at the beginning of a poem, de-
veloped them and then concluded.
Become Subjective
Hall said he has moved toward
more subjective content as his
poems' forms have changed. ;
"Now the material' which ap-
peals to me is totally different. I
used to start with an event like
marriage or the birth of my son
and work from there." Poems in
his first book "Exiles and Mar-
riages," published in 1955, are
mostly of the seeing-writing sort.
Citing "The Muskox" as the
new type of poem, he explained
how it was written.
Never Seen It
"Somebody mentioned 'muskox'
to me one day. I don't think I've
ever seen a muskox, but the idea
of the animal started something
going." The poem turned out hav-
ing "all sorts of dark and brood-
ing strains I never intended."
Now that he can look back at
the poem-"and I couldn't say this

until a few days ago"-he sees it Acting Postmaster Hugh P. Gas

j.

was "a journey through the ani-
mal identity." The poem "Grass"
traveled into "the vegetable iden-
tity."
"I became aware that some of
the things I liked in older works
did this," he said.
Keeping Abreast

I

ton yesterday lashed out at poli- ministration, although he was a
tical appointments of postmas- Democrat.
ters, calling them a "perversion of Although he said he has been
democracy. friends with Bachman for "many
Gaston, a Republican, is sched- years," Gaston expressed his re-
uled to be replaced Friday by Dem- giet over "the decision of the
ocrat Donald G. Bachman. Democrats making this change for
several reasons, especially since
A move is underway to save other acting postmasters appoint-
Gaston's job by both Ann Arbor ed during former administrations
and Kentucky Democrats. indi- have been accepted by their local
vidual local Democrats have sent Democratic committees and con-
letters to Sen. Patrick V. McNa- firmed."
mara (D-Mich) protesting the re- The City Council and a number
placement and calling attention to of members of the local Chamber
Gaston's record in the 13 months of Commerce recently expressed
he has served. their commendation of Gaston's

A poet must know what
poets are attempting and
accomplished. Hall quoted
Dylan Thomas:

other
have
from

5Muet :

"Not to be aware of the work
of your time is to be three-quar-
ters dead."
Today's poets are always chang-
ing, Hall remarked. Maybe, like
fashion, poems are exhausted by
blanket communication. That still
leaves a question as to why ob-
scure poets are changing, too.
Dogma Puzzles
"I can accept the dogma, but I
don't know why it's true. Perhaps
the kind of personality which can
be an artist in this era is the kind
which would be most amenable to
change in any time."
Does this well-built, conserva-
tively dressed poet see a stereotype
among his fellows? Only to the
extend that "most artists never
know whether they're good, or
whether they're fooling people all
the time.
"This worrying about his art is
the troubling you see in poets."
He disparaged the "clichetic suf-
fering."

Kentucky Republicans and Dem-
ocrats plan to question the govern-
ment's procedure in ousting Gas-
ton on the floor of the Senate,
which will confirm the appoint-
ment, They will do so because
Gaston's wife, who died last April,
was a former resident of Kentucky
and an army nurse who served
overseas during World War II.
They will question the govern-
ment's attitude toward parental
support of children of a deceased
army nurse. (Gaston has two
young children.)
Gaston yesterday said 'the pa-
tronage system is "not conducive
to attracting qualified and experi-
enced persons into federal career
service."
He pointed out that the late
Postmaster Oswald Koch, who
served until his death in June,
1960, was detained during eight
years of a Republican national ad-

work.

DONALD HALL
. .. interest in technique

New City Hall
To Cost Extra
The proposed City Hall will cost
taxpayers $133,572 more than the
original report's estimate, a city
council meeting revealed Monday
night.
The structure, scheduled for
completion in October, 1962. was
estimated by the Alden B. Dow
architect firm of Midland at
$2,408,572. Last November, Ann
Arbor property owners had over-
whelmingly approved a bond is-
sue commitment of $2,275,000.
The report set off a heated de-
bate in which a motion was pre-
sented to force the architectural
firm to cut back plans to the
original estimate but was defeated.

;'~

HI-FH-STUDIO
DIAMOND NEEDLES from $2.95
Rapid phono and radio service-Hi Fi components, largest
selection in area, featuring Harmon-Kardon Citation
kits, Eico kits, Dyna kits, Scott kits. FM MULTIPLEX
STEREO is here. In a few days we will demonstrate this
new technique to our customers.
1319 South University-near Washtenaw-NO 8-7942

the art. Lawyers see in terms of
litigation. A poet may look at life
in terms of the poems it will give
him. He makes literary shapes of
what he sees.
"You might say we're fixated at
the oral stage-fixated at what
can be done with words."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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NOW!

DIAL
NO 8-6416

HELD OVER
"ABSOLUTELY avr y
STAGGERING Nigh a
15BRILIANTr
-Crowther, t. r. teenin

I

Dial
NO 2-6264
Sandra
John
GAVIN.

.TATE

ENDS
TON ITE

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 19
General Notices
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts and Schools of Business Adminis-
tration, Education, Music, Natural Re-
sources, Nursing, and Public Health:
Students who received marks of I, X or
"no report" at the end of their last
semested or summer session of attend-
ance will receive a grade of "E" in
the course or courses unless this work
is made up. In the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts and the
Schools of Music and Nursing this date
is by July 24. In the Schools of Busi-
ness Administration, Education, Natur-
al Resources, and Public Health this
date is by July 26. Students wishing
an extension of time beyond these dates
should file a petition with the appro-
priate official of their school.
Events Wednesday
German Coffee Hour: Wed., July 19 at
2 p.m. in 4072 Frieze Bldg. All persons
interested in speaking German are wel-
come.
Educational Film Preview: "Images
from Nature" and "Telling Stories to
Children" and "Rythmetic" will be
shown on Wed., July 19 at 2 p.m. in
the Schorling Aud., University School.
Concert: The Stanley Quartet will
present a concert on Wed., July 19
at 8:30 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture
Hall. Open to the public.
Letters de mon moulin, the second in
the series of four films will be shown
Wed., July 19 at 7:30 p.m. in the Multi-
purpose Room, Undergraduate Library.
Those who wish to join for the rest
of the Summer Session may purchase
their membership cards at 2076 Frieze
Bldg. from 9 to 5, or at the door for
$1.25.

THURSDAY

LANA 5
&iauau'a wun.COLOR
IABON m tDSHOWS AT 1:00 - 3:051
5:10 - 7:15 and 9:20

a concert on Thurs., July 20 at 7:15
p.m. on the Diag. William D. Revelli,
conductor. George Cavender, assistant
conductor. In the event of rain, the
concert will be held in Hill Aud.
Educational Film Preview: Thurs.,
July 20 a 2 p.m. in the Schorling Aud.,
University School. Films to be shown
include: "Siam" and "I Live in Ha-
waii."
Summer Session Lecture series: "The
Confederate States of America" by
Dwight L. Dumond, Prof. of History on
Thurs., July 20 at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. A.
Linguistic Forum Lecture: Prof. Paul
Friedrich, University of Pennsylvania,
will speak on "Russian Kinship and
Semantic Anaylsis" on Thurs., July 20
at 7:30 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Doctoral Examination for Thomas
Warwick Butler, Jr., Electrical Engi-
neering;. thesis: "Precise Frequency
Synthesis Using Nonprecise Tuning
Components," Thurs., July 20, 2076 E.
Engineering Bldg., at 3 p.m. Chairman,
J. A. Boyd.
Placement
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Rohm & Haas Co., Philadelphia, Pa.-
Grads with technical trng. for several
openings in basic research, dev., prod.,
and sales. BS in Ach, and Design and
BS-MS in Chem., Chem. Sngrg., ME,
and Biochemistry.
Charles E. Merrill Books, Inc., Colum-
bus, Ohio-Technical Editor for Col-
lege Division. Require man with good
tech., scientific background and confi-
dent command of the language. Prefer
extensive exper. in tech. writing. To be
responsible for editing college engrg.,
math and science texts.
Wyatt & Morse, Inc., Chicago, Ill.-
Highly qualified experienced grads for
senior openings in client firms: Tax
Mger. to head corporate level tax
dept.-C.P.A. & L.L.B. desired; exten-
sive tax exper. essential. Divisional
Controller-need man with potential
of becoming financial vice-president of
large Midwest mfgrg. firm. Res. Director
of Engrg. for div. of large corp.-
require exper. in field of large motive
equipment.
Pontiac Press, Pontiac, Mich.-Open-
ing on copy desk for grad. with ex-
perience on a copy desk, in writing
headlines and editing all types of copy,
under pressure.
A. M. Kinney, Inc., (Consulting Engi-
neers) Cincinnati, Ohio - Continuing
need for experienced graduate Mech.
Engnrs. and Architects (including Arch.
Specifications Writer). Also, Structural
Engnrs"-all degree levels-with mini-
mum of 5 yrs. experience.
Kern County, California - Clinical
Psychologist-require Ph.D. and 1 yr.
professional experience. State and
county residence requirements waived.
Applications accepted indefinitely.
State of Michigan-Nursing Methods
Analyst, to work from central office of
Dept. of Mental Health. Must be Michi-
gan-registered grad, nurse with 3 yrs.
exper. as Asst. Director of Nursing in
hospital or school of nursing. Apply
before Aug. 7. Washtenaw County loca-
tion.
Detroit Civil Service-Latest listing of
currnet openings now on file at 3200
SAB., Gen'l. Div.
New York State Civil Service-Recre-
ation Instructor-college grad. with 15
hrs. in recreation courses or 6 mos.

pertinent exper. Also, Asst, Rec. Instruc-
tor-2 yrs. college trng. or 1 yr. recrea-
tion exper. N.Y. state residence not
required. Application accepted continu-
ously.
Southern Oakland Girl Scouts, Inc.,
Berkley, Mich.-District Advisor-BA in
Lib'I. Arts and group leadership exper-
ience. Camp leadership experience de-
sirable. MA would qualify for higher
salary level. For Sept., 1961 opening.
Please contact Gen'l. Div. of Bureau
of Appts., 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544 for fur-
ther details.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications can be made in
2200 SAB Monday through Friday, 8:00
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring part-
time or temporary employes should con-

tact Jack Lardie at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Rm. 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Salesman - reporter, for campus
magazine, start September.
1-Married couple, no childlren, be-
tween 25-30 years of age, to super-
vise children, live in, premanent
position.
3-Salesmen, commission basis, must
S have car.
57-Psychological subjects, several one
hour experiments.
3-Salesmen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
FEMALE
2-Saleswomen, selling mazagine sub-
scriptions.
13-Psychological subjects, several one
hour experiments.
1-Married couple, no children, be-
tween 25-30 years of age, to super-
vise children, live in, permanent
position.

THIS FRIDAY
9-12
MUSIC by
Stanley Mogelnicki & Orchestra
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM
BARGAIN DAYS
g020% off on Entire ~
'Mrchandise .
0 NA ART SHOP y
330 Maynard Street
Lt) a--- t -. o " - ) <----y --- <"-'<""y

4

:4

THE* FRENCH CLUB
presents
Three feature-length French Films
July 19, August 1, August 9
Undergraduate Library multi-purpose room
at 7:30 P.M.

4

I

4

...... }:"«>tiv.......': .jai..' ti ........ ....... .....«... ...

MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE
in 2076 Frieze Bldg.-9 A.M. to 5 P.M.
$1.25

14

WEATHER

ii

(l

BUGGING
YOU?
Get away from it a ll -

hm?
come to

A

4

the ear 1978 ad watch
Vladimir Mayakovsky's biting
satire on Communist society.
dTONIGHT
(with performances thru Sat., 8 P.M.)
MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
TH E
BED-
{:-

during Ann Arbor's 33rd annual
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, and FRIDAY
MISSILE DISPLAY AND
CIVIL DEFENSE SHELTER
on North University near State Street
STREET ART FAIR
on South University
CARNIVAL RIDES

.I

, .

I

I

I I Kin-rc. r::i- ---j Kl-+ i I I

I

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