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July 15, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-15

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SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1961
To~ M "
Views UnionBargaining Power
:+>-- O

THE MICHIG~AN DANL

LMru IVES,

AL au ITAXvasAvtoty itMaLZ PAGE THRI
1

ELECTRONIC WONDER:
State Seeks Highway

When collective bargaining dis-
putes arise, as between the union
and steel companies in 1959, un-
ion power far outweighs that of
the company, R. Conrad Cooper,
executive vice-president in charge
of personnel services for the Unit-
ed States Steel Corporation, said,
yesterday.
Speaking at the Advanced Per-
sonnel Development Course pre-
sented by the University Bureau
of Industrial Relations, Cooper
emphasized that the future course
of labor - management relations
may determine America's success
as a world power and a free. en-
terprise system.
Nation's Future
The nation's future depends "in
part upon the success or failure
of collective bargaining, not only
as an institution for the handling
of employe-employer dealings, but

-

-

. 1
DIAL NO 5-6290
HELD OVER
2ND BIG WEEK
THE HAPPY
SUMMERTIME
HIT!
WAIT
DIlsNEy
tvay

as it effects the economic health
of individual plants, companies,
industries and the country at
large," he said.
Union leaders "are in a position
of tremendous power with attend-
ant responsibility. The existence
and use of this vast power pro-
duces the situation where in a
group of steel companies negotiate
in concert through a designated
negotiating team.
Union Force
"On the union's side there is
the full force of organized aggres-
siveness. The union enjoys and
heretofore has employed legal im-
munity at will to shut down most
of the nation's steel-making capa-
city to enforce its wage and bene-
fit demands," he explained.
"But on the side of the com-
panies there lies only the power
of persuasion ' and ability to say
no to demands which they cannot
conscientiously accept - and to
suffer the consequences.
Job Destruction
"The enforcement of uniform
wage and benefit increases upon
the many competing companies
obviously poses unequal problems
for the individual companies and
plants. The ultimate result of such
practices, if continued, can only
be the destruction of jobs and
employment in companies unable
to remain competitive," he said.
Cooper said a small number of
the larger steel companies have
been forced to "band together as
best they can" to bargain with "a
powerful labor union whose tac-
tics are of such a magnitude as
to have national and even world
consequences." Smaller companies
stand aside to await their eco-
nomic fate," he added.
Results of union power in the
steel industry from 1940 to 1958,

R. CONRAD COOPER
... organized aggressiveness
Cooper said, include an average
rise in man-power employment
costs of 8 per cent per year, com-
pounded, while the average in-
crease in steel shipments per man-
hour was only two per cent per
year, compounded.
"Under the present arrange-
ment, our hope for more construc-
tive collective bargaining in steel
in the foreseeable future rests on
whether the leaders of the steel-
workers union will recognize their
great responsibility and meet it
as effectively as they have here-
tofore exercised their great pow-
er," he added.
Herman Quits.
WHRV Post
Don Herman, of Radio Station
WHRV, has resigned to accept a
newscasting job with WCKY, in
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Herman, of Ypsilanti, was pro-
gram and news director of WHRV.
He will be replaced by his assist-
ant, Dave Nichols.

Michigan is in the running for
selection as the site of the world's
first electronic highway.
The main stretch under consid-
eration is US-23 from Ann Arbor
to Toledo.
An electronic brain would con-
trol the cars on such a highway.
The driver might travel with no
hands on the wheel while gadgets
controlled the car. The other pos-
sibility for the highway's design
is that of hoisting the cars on
electrically controlled platforms.
Bids Considered
Competitive bids from private
industry for construction of the
road will be considered by the
Bureau of Public Roads. General
Motors is bidding'from Michigan.
Other firms such as Westing-
house, Bendix and the Radio Cor-
poration of America are trying
for the contract.
Advisers have told the Kenne-
dy Administration that the auto-'
matic highway is technologically
feasible. It has been the subject
of private industry and univer-
sity research.
High Priority
A committee of experts will sub-
mit recommendations to Secre-
tary of Commerce Luther H.
Hodges, for approval, after which
they will be submitted to Con-
gress. The Administration has in-
dicated that the project has high
priority status.
The tentative proposal calls for
a 100-mile stretch of highway-
possibly between two major cities,
but including rural area. An esti-
mated $50 million would be spent
on the first phase of the experi-
mental program.
The State Highway Department
is also considering as tentative
routes Interstate 75 from Detroit
to Toledo, US-131 south from Kal-
amazoo, US-127 south from Jack-
son and US-27 from below Lans-
ing.
Tourist Attraction
State Highway Commissioner
John C. Mackie said the highway
"would be a wonderful thing for

Michigan." The highway is seen
as a major boost to Michigan's
economy as a tourist attraction.
Officials say that it would rival
the Straits of Mackinac Bridge.
"Motorists would come from all
the other 49 states. It would be a
terrific attraction. It's too bad we
can't figure out some way to
charge admission-if we get it-
but, of course, it would be free,"
said one of them.
Other states which are attempt-
ing to win the construction of the
highway are Ohio and California.
To Replace
HUAC Film
The Defense Department has
completed a film which will re-
place the controversial "Operation
Abolition" and "Communism on
the Map."
The film is to be a training
source for members of the armed
forces. It is described as an "offi-
cial narrative of Communism."
The new film is labeled the "Chal-
lenge of Ideas."
The film was produced in co-
operation with Edward R. Mur-
row, chief of ' the United States
Information Agency, Hanson Bald-
win of the New York Times, Low-
ell Thomas, television and radio
commentator and John Wayne
and Helen Hayes of film and
stage.
Work on the script of the film
was started over a year ago under
the direction of the Pentagon's
troop information and education
experts.
Production of the master film
was close to $20,000. The army
has ordered 200 copies, the Navy
and Marine Corns 184, and the
Air Force 275. Wayne and Miss
Hayes are said to have donated
their services.-
"Challenge of Ideas" is replac-
ing similar films by nondefense
organizations. Among them are
the House Un-American Activi-
ties Committee's film of the San
Francisco riots against the com-
mittee, "Operation Abolition," and
"Communism on the Map."
The Defense Department with-
drew these two films from use
stating that they would be re-
placed by one of its own making.
In ordering this done, the depart-
ment said the film would be used
for troop information programs.
The new film will be followed by
a second which is based on youth
organizations. This film is still in
the script-writing stage. Several
others are planned for production.

TON ITE
SAT., J U LY 15
JAZZ DUO, featuring
ANDY ANDERSON
9 P.M. - 12:30 A.M.
Adm. 75c.
CAFE PROMETHEAN
508 E. William

USED CARS
'58 VAUXALL
4-door sedan in excellent condition
A gas saver-$735.0
Overseas Auto Sales
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
N2
VW CONVERTIBLE
1958 with radio and white walls
Very nice-$1250
Overseas Auto Sales
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
N4
'59 ALFA-ROMEO
Guilletta Roadster with radio, heater
in tip-top condition
$1995.00
Overseas Auto Sales
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
N3
BUSINESS SERVICES
What's Sunday brunch
without bagels?
RALPH'S MARKET has 'em
709 Packard
Ralph's is open till midnight
every night.
J
TUTORING IN SPANISH-M.A., college
teaching experience. NO 2-1716. J14
RIDING LESSONS
Horseback riding. English equipment.
Horses boarded and trained. Herbell
Farm, 4715 E. Joy Road. Phone NO
3-7708. Lloyd Givens, manager-trainer.
J16
SWEET CHERRIES
By the quart or by the pound, pitted.
Also starting the 17th, Montmorency
cherries, washed, pitted and sugared.
HURON FARMS
4674 E. Huron River Dr. NO 8-7808
JI5
PERSONAL
SINCERE, Reallyhad a fabulous time
in the Towers. Hot for Rands-
HONEST. F6
ACADEMIC-MINDED MOTHERS (pets
and spouses prohibited, but offspring
prerequisite) interested in co-op hous-
ing for fall, please write P.O. Box 466.
F9
FOR SALE
JAGUAR XK-120 M Coupe, wire wheels,
22,000 miles. NO 3-9821. BI
DIAMONDS-Several beautiful stones-
sacrifice. NO 2-5685, evenings. B9
'57 METROPOLITAN convertible. Excel-
lent condition. $595. 906 E. Ann St.
B0
HELP WAN ED
MEN
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
AFTERNOONS & EVENINGS
1. Must be neat-appearing
2. Above-average intelligence
3. Able to converse intelligently
WAGES TO BE'DISCUSSED
AT INTERVIEW
CALL MR. NEUMANN
NO 3-6003 . 9 A.M.-2 P.M.
H9
BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.99: wash-n-wear slacks
$2:77; many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W2
TENNIS RACKETS, bicycles, patio fur-
niture, draperies. THE TREASURE
MART, 529 Detroit Street. NO 2-1363.
Open Monday and Friday nights till
9:00. W
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: Woman's watch, vicinity of
Burton Tower. Call 3-2544. A50
LOST-35 mm. colored slides in yellow
envelope, Ann St., Hospital area.
Please call NO 3-5381. Reward. A5

LINES
2
3
4

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

FOR RENT
ONE 2-ROOM APT. with bath, private
parking, and automatic washer and
dryer available July 19. 1-room effi-
ciency apt. completely furnished. 2
other furnished apts. available for
fall. 1921 E. Huron. Call at back
basement door. NO 5-4767. C24
CAMPUS Furnished Apartment. $50 per
month, summer only. NO 3-4322. C19
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. 017
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL-Lovely furnished
apartment suitable for four girls.
Parking. Call 2-0671. C66
3-ROOM furnished apt. near Packard
and State. $70 for summer months.
NO 3-8458. C20
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fall semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. 016
FOUR GIRLS desire roommate to share
house July-August. Reasonable rent.
Close to campus. Call NO.8-6378 eve-
nings. C23
NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. 09
CAMPUS AREA-One-, two- and three-
bedroom apartments. Summer or fall
rental. Call Robertson Realty Co., NO
2-6436. Evenings NO 8-7878 or 426-
3402. 022
FURNISHED University-operated apart-
ments available to married students
and married faculty for summer
session. Leases available on short
term basis. Call NO 2-3169 or apply
University Apartments Office, 2364
Bishop St. Office open Mon. through
Sat. 014
Ann Arbor's
FINEST
Apartments
at
Moderate
Rentals
Schedule of Rentals:.
Studio'.................$ 98 to 126
1-Bedroom .............. 120 to 180
2-Bedroom .............. 225 to 270
3-Bedroom .............. 270 to 330
(Including heat, water, Prigi-
daire range and refrigerator,
swimming pool)
Models open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
and Sunday. Immediate occupancy.
2200 Fuller Road.
HURON
TOWER'S

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-B New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGO1
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-183

.70
.85
1.00

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

1.95
2.40
2.85

1 DAY 3 DAYS

Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GR IN N EL L'S
3 S. Main NO 2-56

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

32

,fi a~r aid Trian~

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as
4
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X2
ake
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Pr~lam Notes
AJ/r

I

the home of Steinway pin
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING TO DENVER July 28. Can ti
riders, share expenses and drivi
Call NO 3-4522 after 6 p.m.
CAR SERVICE. ACCESSORI
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and model
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sale,
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
C-TED STANDARD SERVIC
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessorl
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get It."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
Read
Daily
Class ifed

~~.

JOIN THE FUN
at
HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill St.
TAMARA SLOBODKIN
ISRAELI FOLK SINGER
will perform
followed by group participation
and refreshments
Tuesday, July 18-7:30 P.M.

. .

COOL
"BRILLIANT"
-N.Y. Times
"BRAWLING and
EXHILARANT
ABANDON on
the SCREEN !" Vi.
--Time Magazine j

DIAL
8-6416

The "retirement years" of Amer-
ican citizens will be discussed in
the "Understanding Our World"
series at 9:00 a.m. Sunday over
station WXYZ.
Participants in the University's
Annual Conference on Aging will
consider the development, need for
and national importance of "or-
ganizations of the aged" in a pan-
el discussion hosted by Clark Tib-
bitts, chief of program planning
for the special staff on aging,
Office of the Secretary of Health,
Education and welfare.
Happy Yeoman .,..
The University television series
"The Western Way" will present
a discussion of "The Happy Yeo-
man" by Prof. Howard H. Peck-
ham at 8:30 a.m., Saturday over
station WXYZ.
The director of the Clements
Historical Library will consider the
facts and myths in the evolution
of America's "last great frontier
figure" with the series's host, Prof.
Niel Snortum of the engineering
school.
Observatory Open ...
The University's Radio Astron-
omy Observatory on Peach Moun-
tain will be open to the public
between 2:00 and 4:30 p.m., Sun-
day, at 10280 North Territorial
Road.
TIm observatory will be open
to visItors on the third Sunday of
each month through September.
The radio telescope detects faint
radio waves occurring in deep
space.
Quintet Concert
The University Woodwind Quin-
tet will present a concert at 8:30
p.m. Monday, in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
They will be joined by Charles
Fisher at the piano in playing
"Suite" by George Philipp Tele-
xnann; "Quintet, Op. 51" by Wal-
lingord Riegger; "Scherzino, Op.
24" by Gardner Read; "Cassation"
by Richard Arnell; "Summer Mu-
sic, Op. 31" by Samuel Barber;
and "Sextet, Op. 6" by Ludwig
Thuille.
Student Music ...
John R. Lindenau, grad. and
James Herring, grad, playing the
trumpet and piano, respectively,
will give a concert at 8:30 p.m.
Sunday in Aud. A.
They will be assisted by John
Morse, grad. an'd Jerry Bilik, grad.,
playing the horn and trombone.
The program consists of works by

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Ed
NYHerald Tribune}

(Continued from Page 2)
Lecture: Winifred L. Post, Dana Hall
School, Wellesley, Mass., will speak on
"Towards Better Examinations in Eng-
lish" on Mon., July 17 at 4 p.m. in
Aud. C.
Physics Lecture: Dr. M. H. Macfar-
lane, University of Rochester, will.
speak on "Particle Giant Resonances
in Welter Weight Nuclei" on Mon.,
July 17 at 3:30 p.m. In 2038 Randall
Lab.
Doctoral Examination for Alfred Cur-
tis Hunting, Physics; thesis: "An In-
terferometric Study of the Interaction
of Plane Shock Waves with Monotonic
Channel-Area Constrictions in the 2"
X 7" Shock Tube," Mon., July 17, 2038
Randall Lab., at 2:00 p.m. Chairman,
Otto Laporte.
Placement
NOTICE - The Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
will be open for business as usual,
Mon., July 17, in its new facilities at
3200 SAB. The Summer Placement Serv-
ice will also be open on Monday in
212 SAB. Both offices are now located
in the newly-built addition to the
Student Activities Building. The fol-
lowing new University Extensions have
been assigned:
Director & College Placement - Ext.
3541.
Teacher Placement & Career Counsel-
ing-Ext. 3547.
General & Summer Placement-Ext.
3544.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS-GENERAL
DIVISION:
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
-Bi-weekly listing of current vacancies
for college grads, men & women: now
on file at 3200 SAB. Opening for Super-
visors, Librarians, Bibliographers, Sci-
ence Specialists, etc. Knowledge of
modern foreign languages desirable for
most.
Bendix Systems Division, Ann Arbor
-WOMAN Grad. to act as Instructor
of shorthand & typing for company's
Secretarial Training Program. BA in
Lib'. Arts or Educ. (Some educ. courses
preferred.) No experience required.
Benson & Benson, Inc., Princeton,
N.J.-Project Director Trainees for in-
dependent Market Research Firm. Op-
portunities in all fields of market re-
search. WOMEN college grads. Work
involves field travel part of the time.

Telemann, Casterede, Giannini
and Poulenc.
Innovations .. .
The 32nd annual Summer Edu-
cation Confernece will be in prog-
ress here Monday through Wed-
nesday.
"Innovations in Teaching"' is
the theme of the conference.
Morning general sessions will be
open to the public in Arch. Aud.

___________________at

Some course work in Psych., Math.,
English desirable.
Timken Roller Bearing Co., Canton,
Ohio-Market Research Statistician for
Market Res. Dept. Grad. with back-
ground in Math., preferably through
calculus, and with work in mathemati-
cal statistics. Will be responsible for
supervising others in dept. Prefer re-
cent college grad, interested in on-the-
job trng.
Please contact General Division, Bu-
reau of Appts., 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544 for
further information.
College Placement Interviews-Mon.,
p.m., July 17; Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB-Dean Keesecker of Salem
College, Salem, West Va. will interview
candidates to teach English; Chemistry
& Home Econ., for academic year 1961-
62. Also seeking Librarian. PhD's pre-
ferred but not essential.
Interested candidates, phone Mrs.
Gerther, Bureau of Appointments, Ext.
3541 for appointment.

NO 3-0800
NO 5-9161

LAST PERFORMANCE TONIGHT
8:00 LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
MY 3 ANGELS
$1.75, 1.25

I

j

NEXT WEEK:

MAYAKOVSKY'S "THE BEDBUG"

biting satire on Communist society

I

010

faturd&W N1ight and
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
KOJI SH4MA'S
THE GOLDEN DEMON
Jun Necami, Fuliko Yamamoto

1, U U

SHOWS at 1:00-3:05
DIAL o 5:10-6:55 and 9:05
2-6264 0FEATURES at 1:25
3:30-5:15-7:20 and 9:30

j

Lis

0

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