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July 13, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'THURSDAY, JULY 1.3, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAG*~ THREE

COOL

DIA).
8-64 16

Supervisors Set New Post
For Deputy Training Plan

"BRAWLING and
EXHILARANT
ABANDON on
the SCREEN "
-Time Magazine
1 r
"A GEM"'
- N. Y: Herald Tribune.

*aturciyNiand
&,*tndayMong

DIAL
2-6264

, .

Shows at 1 :00 - 3:05
5:10 - 6:55 and 9:05k
Feature Starts
25 minutes later

Now,TAMMY
is teachin'
a heap o'
LEARN IN'
LIVYIN;
10 IN'
...to a shy,
young
professor!

The Board of Supervisors re-
cently created a lieutenant's posi-
tion in the Ann Arbor Sheriff's
Department to implement a new
recruitment and training program
in the department.
It is anticipated that the per-
son selected for the new position
will make the studies necessary for
maintaining the personnel stan-
dards and arrange the schedule
for training new officers and cur-
rent members of the staff.
The new recruitment program
requires that the new officers
complete a recruit training course
at one of the established police
training schools such as the De-
troit Police Academy, the State
Police Training School or the
training school operated by the
Kent County Sheriff's Depart-
ment.
Standards for the department
include recruiting age limits of
21 through 35, high school grad-
uation, average general aptitude,
top physical condition, as certi-
fied by a county physician, per-
sonality evaluation by a compe-
tent medical authority and gen-
eral adaptability and acceptability
for police work.
The latter is to be determined
by "extensive personal investiga-
tion and interview by a recruit-
ment board."
Sheriff George A. Petersen met
with the board's joint sheriff's
and ways and means committee to
discuss the program before the
board considered it.
He said he concurred substan-
tially with the personnel policies,
standards and practices of lead-
ing police agencies and indicated
such policies could be applied for-
mally to his department.
Petersen set down a policy of:
1) continuously striving to im-
prove the quality-of law enforce
ment in Washtenaw County
Peace Corps
To Hold Tests
Those interested in joining the
Peace Corps can take examina-
tions at 8 a.m. today and tomor-
row at the main Post Office down-
town, 220 North Main Street.
The skills tested for cover many
fields. Tomorrow's tests will be
held for those persons qualified to
teach in secondary schools.
A college .degree isn't a neces-
sary prerequisite for those taking
the exams today. Skilled trades-
men are also greatly sought after.
Tomorrow's examinations will
require applicants to have a col-
lege degree. They wil test people
capable of teaching physics,
chemistry, biology, mathematics
and English at the secondary
school levels.

through improvement in the qual-
ity and ability of personnel;
2) recruitment and promotion of
police officers and other em-
ployees of the department solely
on the basis of merit and fitness
for performing their duties and
3) selection and training of
potential officers by methods and
procedures which are proved the
most effective by leading police
agencies.
The Washtenaw County sheriff
recently was honored by the sher-
iff's school at Higgens lake with
the grand award for county law
enforcement and safety program
for counties with populations of
more than 50,000.
Petersen's department also was
cited with first place for the "best
improvement" award.
"These new policies and stan-
dards will assure further advance-
ments in the quality of law en-
forcement in the county," the
committee said in making its re-
commendations.
The new plan resulted from a
four-month study by the board.
To Hold Talks
on Television,
Education Aids
The Summer Speech Conference
being held here today will cover
topics ranging from educational
television to auditory disorders.
The speech department sponsors
the program, which starts with
a symposium on education tele-
vision at 9:45 a.m. Three area
meetings will begin at 11:00 a.m.
(All meetings are held in Rack-
ham Bldg., and are open to the
public.)
These meetings will discuss
poetry reading, elementary speech
courses and auditory disorders.
The luncheon speaker (at the
Anderson Room in the Union) will
be Prof. Ralph G. Nichols, chair-
man of the rhetoric department
at the University of Minnesota.
Prof. John Gassner of Yale Uni-
versity will discuss "Shaw on
Shakespeare at 2:15 p.m.
Three more meetings will be
held afterwards. Public address,
"Henry Ward Beecher at Fort
Surhter," speech correction and
speech perception will be among
the areas discovered.

Reveal Plan'
Of Renewal
In Ypsilanti
Ypsilanti yesterday revealed its,
new plan for federal-aided urban1
renewal to cost $2,332,838.
The adoption of the plan will
come up at a public meeting Au-
gust 14. $1,644,757 of the money1
would come from the federal gov-
ernment.
Over half of the 367 families in
the renewal area will have to be
moved, according to surveys done
early this year, if the renewal plan
is adopted.
Seventy-one of these families
would be eligible for low-rent
public housing, because they have
incomes of under $300 a month,
according to city estimates.
The 109 acre renewal area has
163 separately owned lots, which
the city would have to buy. Part
of the land to be acquired will be
added to a neighboring park near
an elementary school.
About 173 buildings will be torn
down, cleared away and replaced
by new housing. Most of the area
will'be zoned to permit only one-
or two-family homes. Their lots
would have a minimum of 5,000
square feet.
One of the area's business sec-
tions would be eliminated by this
new zoning. Another section would
not be affected.
The city will pay one-third of
the total costs. This will come to
$704,146. Half will be cash, the
rest various credit resources.
If the residents approve the plan
at the August meeting, and the
federal government agrees to its
share, work could begin this No-
vember, with completion expected
by November, 1964.
Forty-five of the 191 families to
be displaced- are expected to re-
locate in private rented housing.
Seventy-five more are expected to
buy homes of their own.
Giles To Give
Carillon Show
Sidney F. Giles, the Univer-
sity's assistant carilloneur, will
give a concert with the Charles
Baird Carillon at Burton Memorial
Tower today at 7:15 p.m.
Compositions by Schubert, Han-
del and Fleyel, plus one of Giles'
own pieces, will be included in his
performance.

By RUTH EVENHUIS
Prof. H. Arthur Steiner of the
University of California at Los
Angeles expects a build-up rather
than decrease in Communist
power in China.
The lecturer said that the stand-
ing official United States posi-
tion is one of maintaining that;
the Communist regime will not
hold up and that, hence, the
United States hopes to hasten its
downfall by a policy of non-
recognition.
However, non-recognition is not
a policy, but a detail or a tech-
nique, Steiner said. This techni-
que is based on the American
concept of "unilinear history" in
which the pattern of feudalism
giving away eventually to a demo-
cracy under the pressure of the
middle-class is expected to repeat
itself in under-developed coun-
tries of the Orient.
Difficult View
The difficulty with such a view-
point is that China's background
differs from that of the Western
democracies in that it had no
strong middle class which es-
tablished democratic principles.-
When the small middle class over-
threw the Manchu dynasty and
later backed Chiang-Kai-Shek, it
established itself in a privileged
position and provided little relief
to the peasant masses.
Hence, Steiner said the course of
development of Chinese society
has not followed the pattern of
the Western countries.
Further the life in China is
rooted to the land. Its vast acre-
age separates the peasants into
parochial groups which are more
prone to view events in light of
their effect on individual pro-
vinces than on China as a whole.
Rejects Capitalism
China, then, has not developed
a capitalist society, Steiner said.
In fact, it has rejected it. In the
preceding century Western trade
with China fostered a small and
ineffective middle class. It also
pulled the youth of the family
into shipping and consequently,
uprooted the family system of a
subsistence economy.
When Mao-Tse-Tung came into
power he said that in his reading
of Thomas Jefferson and Thomas
Paine he found little that applied
to Chinese society.
China needed a system designed
to alleviate the economic distress
of its lower class masses and
wanted a system which would

PROF. H. ARTHUR STEINER
... unilinear history
raise it to a position of status in
the world community, Steiner
said.
Anti-West Feelings
He also pointed to anti-Western
sentiment created by the "un-
equal treaties" effected when
China became opened to trade.!
Americans living in China were
B ILLIARDS,
and
SWIMMING
daily except Sun.
at the
MICHIGAN UN ION

not subject to Chinese law as
Western powers obtained conces-
sions and spheres of influence, he
said. Western imperialism was
viewed as the enemy of the Chi-
nese people as it exploited them
and reinforced the landlord class.
China sees the United States as
a major threat to world peace.
More particularly, it views it as
a threat to its own national in-
terest. This country's statement
regarding hopes for the demise of
the Red regime is tantamount to
an undeclared state of war, Stein-
er said. Chinese intervention in
Korea and Viet Nam are the re-
sults of a kind of Chinese "Mon-
roe Doctrine" in. which China re-
fuses to tolerate foreign inter-
ference in those'countries which
border her. Further, the United
States' maintenance of an alter-
nate government just off the
mainland is seem as a direct
military threat, Steiner pointed
out.
Since China's differences with
Russia are mainly in the area of
"how far to trust the United
States," Steiner thinks it unlikely
that any rift between the two
countries will occur to place the
West in a stronger position.

4 w

GROWING POWER:
Steiner Views Chinese Policy

1 -1 m

"'""

CHARLES DRAKE
VIRGINIA GREY
JULIA MEADE
Cecil Kellaway
Beulah Bondi
Edgar Buchanan
Gigi Perreau
Juanita Moore
Skeenpay by OSCAR BRODNEY " Oired
Produced by ROSS HUNTER " A UNIVEI

A ROSS HUNTER PRODUCTN
-with the
in Eastman COLOR delightful music
of America's beloved
PERCY FAITH /
ed by HARRY KELLER
RSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

GRAD SOCIAL HOUR
Friday, July 14... 5-7 P.M.
V.F.W. CLUB on E Liberty
25c admission
sponsored by
THE GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL
T HIS FRIDAY
All-Campus Dance
MUSIC by
Stanley Mogelnicki & Orchestra
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM

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DIAL NO 5-6290
HELD OVER
2ND BIG WEEK
THE HAPPY
SUMMERTIME
HIT !
WAIT.y
DISNEY
a$
ws 2~BU

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
THURSDAY, JULY 13
Events Thursday
Baratin, the informal conversation
group of the French Club, will meet
Thurs., July 13, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the
Romance Languages Department
Lounge, 3050 Frieze Bldg. All those
interested in speaking French are cor-
dially invited to stop in.
student Recital: Barbara Barclay,
pianist, will present a recital in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for the
degree Master of Music on Thurs., July
13, 8:30 p.m., Aud. A. Compositions she
will play are by Schumann, Schoen-
berg, and Beethoven. Open to the pub-
lic.
Educational Film Preview: "'Think-
ing' Machines" and "Project "Hohole'"
will be shown on Thurs., July 13 at 2
p.m. in the Schorling Aud., University
School. Open to the public without
charge.
Summer Session Lecture Series: "The
Nationalism of Right" will be discussed
by Paul G. Kauper, Prof. of Law, on
Thurs., July 13 at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. A.
At 7:30 p.m. he will participate in a
panel discussion in Aud. B.
Linguistic Forum Lecture: "Some As-
pects of English Syntax" will be dis-
cussed by Prof. W. Freeman Twaddell,
Brown University on Thurs., July 13 at
7:30 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Physics Lecture: "Isotopic Spin" will
be discussed by Dr. J. B. French, Uni-

versity of Rochester on Thurs., July 13
at 3:30 p.m. in 2038 Randall Lab.
Events Friday
Educational Film Preview: Fri., July
14 at 2 p.m. In the Schorling Aud.,
University School. "Nick" and "Secrets
of the Underwater World."
Guest Lecturer: Roberto Gerhard,
English composer and Visiting Profes-
sor of Composition Spring 1960, will re-
turn on Fri., July 14. to lecture at 4:15
p.m. in Aud. D on "Sound Observed,"
and will perform his "Colage." Open to
the public without charge.
Physics Lecture: Dr. G. R. Satchler,
Oak Ridge, will speak on "Distorted
wave Theory of Direct Reactions" on
Fri., July 14 at 3:30 p.m. in 2038 Randall
Lab.

Doctoral Examination for John Paul
Ulrich, Physics; thesis: "The Refrac-
tion of Plane and Cylindrical Sound
Disturbances by a Plane Moving Shock
Front," Fri., July 14, 2038 Randall Lab.,
at 3:00 p.m. Chairman, Otto Laporte.
Organization
Notices
Hillel Foundation, Folk Dancing, July
13, 7:30 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
* * *
The Sailing Club will meet this eve-
ning, 7:45 p.m., in 311 W. Engineering.
Movies will follow the regular business
meeting.

select the right lotion for
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burns and discoloration. The
Quarry will help you to a per-
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Also choose from the Quarry's
selection of insect repellents
and other summer cosmetics
-biggest under the sun.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
presents
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday:
RASHOMON

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S.G.C.
Cinqem fa yUd4
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
KOJI SHIMA'S
THE GOLDEN DEMON

Until Kurosawa's extraordi-
nary Rashomon won the Venice
Grand Prize in 1951, almost all
Westerners assumed that Jap-
anese films were epigonous pro-
ducts for strictly Eastern audi-
ences. Ugetsu and Gate of Hell.
almost as widely hailed as
Rashomon, indicated that there
had risen in Japan a new school
of directors who were utilizing
traditional Japanese stories to
comment with telling contem-
porary insights on the human
condition. Two aspects of their
work were immediately strik-
ing. Philosophically, they raised
questions for which their work
was an illustration and not an
answer, an implication of social
nihilism that reflected the post-
war Japanese scene and bore
more than a passing resem-
blance (which we will not ex-
amine here) to the work of
Wedekind and Pirandello. Aes-
thetically, they were bold and

films that employed color, the
effects were vivid, painstaking,
and so individual that the East-
man Kodak Company, accus-
tomed to the dull mechanics of
Hollywood naturalism, re-
quested prints of their own pro-
cess for study.
The Golden Demon is based
on what has been called Japan's
first modern novel, a turn-of-
the-century tale, in which the
old feudal Japan is in full con-
flict with the Westernization
ordered by the Meiji emperor.
A Romeo and Juliet story, it
relates the troubles of two
young lovers whose match is
broken by their parents' in-
volvement with the "Golden
Demon"- money, the embodi-
ment of the soulless industrial
revolution. It has been called
"a romanticized morality play";
in any case, the theme and its
realization brought not only
plaudits from the pooular

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