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July 01, 1961 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-01

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 1,190

PAGE P01311 THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JULY 1.1961

___ _._ _,

Ford Pitches Yanks to 5-1.Victory

SUCCEEDS WILSON:
Reed Takes Over
ew Big Ten Post

CLASSIFIEDS I

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Whitey Ford,
backed by a tremendous, inside-
the-park home run by Mickey
Mantle, collected his 14th victory
and eighth in a row with a five-
hitter as the New York Yankees
came from behind and beat the
Washington Senators 5-1.
Ford; the majors' top winner,
thus became the eighth major
league pitcher to win eight games
in one month-and first left-
hander to do it since Rube Mar-
quard of the 1912 New York Gi-
ants. Marquard also did it in
June, while running up a modern
record of 19 straight victories.
The Yankees, down 1-0 after
Washington scored an unearned
run in the first inning, were blank-
ed' on two hits by right-hander
Dick Donovan until the sixth in-
ning. Then they busted loose for
three runs in a rally capped by
Mantle's 25th homer-a tie-break-
ing, 440-foot shot off the center
field wall that was hit so high and
far that Mick scored standing up,
without a play at the plate.
* * *
Reds 4, Braves 0
MILWAUKEE -- Cincinnati
righthander Joey Jay registered
his 10th victory with the ninth
inning assistance of Bill Henry as
the first-place Reds blanked the
Milwaukee Braves 4-0.
Jay, a former Milwaukee bonus
player traded to the Reds last win-
ter, was tagged for 11 hits but
bore down in the tight spots in
checking his former teammates.
Bonus Group'
NEW YORK UP) - Baseball
Commissioner Ford Frick yester-
day named six officials to a com-
mittee which will try to work out
some solution to the bonus prob-
lem that has alarmed most club
owners by huge payments to un-
tried rookies.
The three representatives of the
National League are Bob Carpen-
ter, president of the Philadelphia
Phillies; Joe Brown, Pittsburgh
general manager, and Bing De-
vine, St. Louis general manager.
From the American League
Frick named John Fetzer, presi-
dent of the Detroit Tigers; Lee
MacPhail, president and. general
manager of the Baltimore Orioles
and Roy Hamey, general manager
of the New York Yankees.
.1

The Reds, who maintained their
21 game lead over San Francisco
and Los Angeles, jumped on Mil-
waukee starter Warren Spahn for
three runs in the fifth and added
their final tally in the ninth
against reliever Claude Raymond.
* , ,

Tigers 6, Orioles 5
BALTIMORE - Charlie
well's 12th inning pinch
knocked in the winning run
first-place Detroit Tigers
the Baltimore Orioles 6-5.

Max-
single
as the
edged

The victory left the Tigers two
games ahead. of the New York
Yankees and cooled off the surg-
ing Orioles who had won five in
a row.
Hoyt Wilhelm, who pitched sev-
en innings in his longest relief
stint of the season, was tagged

lies to regain second place in the
National League.
The Dodgers endowed San Wil-
liams with an 8-1 lead as Daryl
Spencer clouted a home run, Wil-
lie Davis hit two triples and Mau-
ry Wills three singles. The right-
hander, wilting in the 90-degree
heat, was chased in the sixth in-
ning when the Phillies rallied for
five runs.
Dick Farrell, who came in as
relief for Williams, also got in-
volved in the five-run ruckus but
he settled down and held his for-
mer teammates scoreless the rest
of the game to preserve Williams'
seventh mound victory in 14 de-
cisions.
Indians 10, Red Sox 2
BOSTON-Surprise starter Mike
De La Hoz and Woody Held bat-
ted in three Cleveland runs each
as the faltering Indians walloped
Boston 10-2.
Infielder De La Hoz contribut-
ed a three-run homer and Held
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Detroit 48 26 .649 -
NewYork 45 27 .625 2
Cleveland 43 33 .566 .6
Baltimore 40 35 .533 82/2
Boston 38 36 .514 10
x-Chicago 38 36 .514 10
Washington 33 42 .440 1522
Kansas City 29 43 .403 18
Minnesota 29 45 .392 19
x-Los Angeles 27 47 .365 21
x-Playing night game.
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Detroit 6, Baltimore 5 (12 inn.)
New York 5, Washington 1
Cleveland 10, Boston 2
Minnesota 8, Kansas City 2
Chicago at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Baltimore
Washington at New York
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
Minnesota at Kansas City
Cleveland at Boston

four straight singles to right hand-
er Gary Bell's fifth victory made
easy by the 13-hit attack behind
him.
It was only the third Cleve-
land triumph in 13 starts.
Bell, able to complete only four
of his previous 16 starts, struck
out 8 en route to his 6-hitter.
The latter responded with a pop-
up double when Chuck Schilling
lost the ball in the lights in the
third inning. The blow sent Bell
to third whence he scored the
first run of the game on loser
Billy Muffett's wild pitch.
De La Hoz homered to cap a 5-
run fourth. Held and Bell had sin-
gled in runs ahead of the four-
run belt.

CHICAGO (P) - A World War'
II navy officer with a background
in Washington politics will take
over today as new Commissioner
of the Big Ten Conference with
this goal uppermost:
"To see the Big Ten retain its
position of leadership and prestige
in intercollegiate athletics."
He is Bill Reed, 45, Assistant
Big Ten Commissioner who will
move up into the top post on the
retirement of Kenneth L. (Tug)
Wilson at age 65.
"I don't see any real threat to

Jessen Ties Prentice for
National Open Golf Lead

Big Ten prestige at this time,"
Reed said. "We're on pretty sound
footing. I think we have made
very definite strides consistent
with the tradition of the con-
ference in setting up eligibility
and other standards which will
integrate athletics wth the edu-
cational program."
The adoption of tougher eligibil-
ity standards by Big Ten schools
and a new Rose Bowl contract
with west coast universities both
appear imminent in the early part
of Reed's tenure.
The Big Ten currently operates
without a contractual link with
west coast schools for the Rose
Bowl.
Big Ten teams may play at
Pasadena, as they have for the
past two years, if they accept in-
dividual invitations.
The Pacific Coast schools still
are seeking a new contract tieup,
with the Big Ten and the Western
Conference is expected to approve
the arrangement at its December
meeting.
A change of policy at Minne-
sota indicates the Big Ten will
vote 6-1 in favor of such a con-
tract.
Program Revised
Big Ten athletic officials at
their spring meeting sharply re-
vised the aid-to-athletes program,
tieing it in with more stringent
academic entrance and classroom
progress requirements.
The program, still to be ap-
proved by individual schools, per-
mits the granting of tuition, fees,
room and board if the student
maintains a high scholastic rat-
ings.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
.70
.85
1.00

Figure 5 overage words to
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:
Phone NO 2-4786

a line
00 Mon. thru Fri.

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
.58
.70
.83

I

SPRINGFIELD, N.J. (P) - Dark
horse JoAnn Prentice played
steadily and blonde Ruth Jessen
played sensationally in the heat
and wind at Baltursol yesterday
to share the lead at the halfway
point in the Women's National
Open Golf championship.
Miss Prentice, a dark-haired 28-
year-old pro from Birmingham,
Ala., got the benefit of an early
starting time when the air was
calm, and added a solid 76 to her
opening round of 72 for a 36-hole
total of 148.
Miss Jessen, of Seattle, fired a
one-over-par 73 on a hot, breezy
afternoon after an opening 75 for
the same total.
Par for the rolling 6,372-yard
Baltursol course is 36-36-72 and
no one could match it yesterday.
Miss Jessen and another Wash-

ington girl, Shirley Englehorn, a
20-year-old pro from Spokane,
had 73's for the best rounds of
the day. Shirley had an 80 on her
first round and was five strokes
back after 36 holes.
Mickey Wright, two-time win-
ner of the Women's Open, yielded
to tension and tournament pres-
sure after sharing the first round
lead with Miss Prentice and skied
to an 80.
"I was tense and couldn't sleep,
last night," Mickey said. "I knew
this morning I was going to have
a real great round or a real bad
one."
She had the bad one but still
wound up in a tie with Louise
Suggs at 152, four strokes off the
pace. She still has a chance to
make up that much in tomorrow's
36-hole final.

BARGAIN CORNER
BLONDE TABLES, Danish dining set
Haywood-Wakefield birch, Oriental
rugs, gentleman's desk, awaiting you
at the Treasure Mart, 529 Detroit, NO
2-1363. Open Mon. & Fri. nites 'til 9.
W1
ENGLISH BIKE - Boy's Lightweight
Centaur. Like new, with brand new
tires. $25. Call NO 2-4736.,
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.99; wasb-n-wear slacks
$2.77; many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W2
FOR SALE
JAGUAR XK-120 M Coupe, wire wheels,
22,000 miles. NO 3-9821. Bi
FINEST CAMPING TENT-9'4" square
draw-tight Holiday. 29 pounds com-
plete, stakeless outside frame. Unused,
40 per cent discount. NO 3.6653: B2
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Woman's blue billfold. Valuable
papers. Alberta Cohan, NO 2-6889.
REWARD. A2
LOST-Florentine gold circle pin with
bow and pearl. BetweenCatherine St.
and Undergrad Lib. or Union. NO
5-5143. A3
HELP WANTED
MALE SUBJECTS wanted for psycho-
logical experiment: Pay $1.25/hour.
Call Susan Karp, NO 3-8283 between
5 and 7 p.m. or University Ext. 2911
between 9 a.m. and noon. H3
5-MEN-5
FULL OR PART TIME
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
FOR THOSE WHO QUALIFY

BUSINESS SERVICES
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
IF YOU plan to LEARN TO FLY this
summer, it will pay to compare
costs. $7.90 per hour solo. No dues or
membership fees. NO, 8-6373. JS
HAVE A PICNIC! BEAT THE HEAT!
cold watermelons
cold pop
fresh fruit
hot barbequed chickens
hot barbequed ribs
at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Open every night (July 4th too) 'til 12
J11
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.

'4

Lubrication $1.50

Nye Motor Sales

WHITEY FORD
handcuffs Nats
with the loss. Maxwell's bouncer
to right folowed a double by Steve
Bpros and a walk to Jake Wood.
The winner was Terry Fox, the
third Tiger pitcher who came on
to stop a Baltimore threat in the
eighth inning and allowed two hits
the rest of the way.
* * * -
Dodgers 10, Phillies 6
PHILADELPHIA-The Los An-
geles Dodgers, hitting early and
often, built up a commanding lead
and made it stand up for a 10-6
victory over the Philadelphia Phil-
..

140'S AT MIDWAY MARK:
Three Tied in Flint Open

514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858

S7,

Cincinn
Los Ang
San Fra
Pittsbu
Milwauk
St. Lou
Chicago
Philade

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L P
iati 45 28 .6
geles 43 31.5
ncisco 41 31 .
rgh 36 31 .5
kee 33 33 .
is 31 38 .4
28 42 .
lphia 22 45 .

ct.
.16
.581
569
.537
500
449
400
328

GB
2 /
31/2
6
8f
12
15/2
20

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 10, Philadelphia 6
Pittsburgh 4, San Francisco 3
St. Louis 11, Chicago 5
Cincinnati 4, Milwaukee 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at Milwaukee
San Francisco at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Chicago
Los Angeles at Philadelphia (n)
BLI A R DS
and
SWIMMING
daily except Sun.
at the
MICHIGAN UN ION

FLINT (A)-Billy Casper, Dave
Ragan and Johnny Pott-golfers
who haven't won this year-rock-
eted into a deadlock lead at the
halfway point of the Flint Open
yesterday with sizzling second
rounds.
Each totaled 4-under-par 140
after 36 holes of the $53,000 event
for a one-stroke lead.
Casper, winless since rattling
off three straight victories last
fall, shot a 4-under-par 68 on the
par-72 Warwick Hills' 7,280-yard
layout. Casper, winner of the first
Flint Open in 1958, shot a 72
Thursday.
Ragan, a 25-year-old Floridian
whose only major pro victory was
in the Eastern Open two years
ago, had a 69 to go with Thurs-
day's 71.
Pott, also 25, had a 68 after a

ZINDELL
OLDSMOBILE
Ann Arbor, NO 3-0507

II

I

""

"""

C OMll

I
I

06'tO1
r H

CHURJ i-Ir
\ 3ABl AT

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets. Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship. "'This
Nation under God?" Sermon by Dr. Rupert.
10:15 Discussion Group and Coffee in the Pine
Room.
2:00 P.M. Picnic: Meet in Wesley lounge.
Wednesdays-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion, Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over in
time for 8:00 classes).
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
9:30 A.M. Summer Worship. Child Care pro-
vided.
Minister: Dr. William S. Baker.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M. Worship Service

blistering back nine which he
completed with a 4-under-par 32.
The Louisianian, who won two
crowns last year, had four straight
birdies.
Rugged
Par remained a rugged task-
master for most of the other pros
on lengthy Warwick Hills as tem-
peratures soared into the 90's.
The leading trio was trailed by
Don January, Al Balding and Lee
Raymond at 141.
Joe Campbell, first round lead-
er with a 68; sagged to a 75 yes-
terday for a 143.
Ragan had a good chance to
take the lead, but failed to break
par on the back nine, coming in
with a 36.
The hefty Casper, troubled by
a sprained back since Sunday, al-
most withdrew from the tourna-
ment. A Wednesday practice
round forced his decision to stay
in the running for the $10,000 top
prize.
Steady Putting
Steady putting and finesse out
of the traps saved Casper's day.
"I hit real good trap shots, got
WILD
A Summer Seer
is Always Cooler in
Seersucker
" r
. .
Every gentleman can become
a wise summer prophet by
predicting days of heat made

up close and made putts for pars
on the first nine," said the 30-
year-old pro from Apple Valley,
Calif.
A birdie on the par-5 first hole
that stretches 587 yards featured
Ragan's round. His second shot
put him on the green. "It was the
best shot I made all day," said
Ragan. "I used a driver on nry
second shot 'and then put it in
with two putts."
'Got Hot'
"I got hot with birdies on 12,
13, 14, and 15," said Pott. "Then
I missed one from about two feet
on 16."
Tommy Aaron and Jackie
Burke were deadlocked for sev-
enth place at 142.
M' .Athlete
Signs Pact
DETROIT OP) - The Detroit
Tigers yesterday signed former
University of Michigan football
end and baseball outfielder John
Halstead to a minor league con-
tract for the second time in 10
days.
The Tigers' original contract
was voided in a dispute over the
interpretation of major league
rules relating to the signing of
college students. Halstead was a
senior last season.
He will report to the Mont-
gomery, Ala., team in the class D
Alabama-Florida League.
NCAA Probes
U-D Program
Collegiate Athletic Association
will investigate the athletic set-
up at the University of Detroit,
where two athletes admitted ac-
cepting money from a basketball
"fixer," the Detroit Free Press
reported yesterday.
Special NCAA agents will ex-
amine records of alumni activi-
ties in connection with U-D
sports, the Free Press said.
The inquiry was prompted, ac-
cording to the newspaper, by cir-
cumstances surrounding the, ex-
pulsion of basketball stars Char-
lie North and John Morgan after
both admitted complicity in the
nationwide college basketball bet-
ting scandals.
The NCAA was reported to be
interested in statements by North
and Morgan that twice a month
while they were enrolled at De-
troit they each received an en-
velope containing $20 from "the
alumni."
Walter Byers, executive secre-
tary of the NCAA, refused to con-
firm or deny that the investiga-
tion was underway, the Free Press
said. Byers, whose office is in Kan-
sas City, was quoted as saying:

CALL MR. NEUMAN
FOR APPOINTMENT
NO 3-6003 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Hxx

FOR RENT
AVAILABLE for 2 male students-cool
basement apartment near campus. 716
South Division. C16
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17
PARKING SPACE behind Campus The-
atre. $5.50/month. NO 3-4322. C7
REDUCED TO $65 - Campus 4-room
furnished apartment. Newly painted.
Summer only. NO 3-4322. C15
ON CAMPUS, 1021 E. Huron-One 1-rm.
apartment, $50; one 3-rm. apartment
$65. Call at back basement door. C18
3-ROOM furnished apartment with pri-
vate bath and washing facilities. NO
3-8458. C13
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fall semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. C16
CAMPUS-2 blocks. Two-bedroom apt.
suitable for 4 adults. First floor at
reduced rate for summer. NO 3-4062.
C11
NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. C9
LARGE ROOM with private bath, $50
per month, for instructor, teaching
fellow, or intern with transportation.
Use of lovely grounds. 2107 Hill.
Phone NO 8-7240 before calling. C14
FURNISHED ;University-operated apart-
ments available to married students
and married faculty for summer
session. Leases available on short
term basis. Call NO 2-3169 or apply
University Apartments Office, 2364
Bishop St. Office open Mon. through
Sat. C14
CAMPUS APTS.

C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
81
WANTED
WANTED TO BUY OR RENT, cash
terms, 16mm. movie camera. NO.
3-2069. BB1
PERSONAL
M.-Thanks for the swimming suit. It
didn't fit. E. and N. Ps
GET-ACQUAINTED MIXER on the
lawn, B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation,
Thursday, July 6th, 7:30 P.M. F4
Don't miss summer entertainment!
SUBSCRIBE NOW
TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Call NO 2-3241
It's only $2 00 away from your door
every morning.
F2
THERE'S NO PLACE like the Schwaben
Inn for a Schwabenburgerl 215 Ashley.
Fl
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
ATTENTION SUMMER STUDENTS!
CLEARANCE ON ALL HI FI
PORTABLES IN STOCK
-UP TO 20% OFF-
SERVICE AND REPAIRS FAST,
EFFICIENT, GUARANTEED
DIAMOND NEEDLES FROM $2.95
ANN ARBOR
HI FI & TV CENTER
304 South Thayer
ACROSS FROM HILL AUDITORIUM
ASK FOR BIG JIM
X1
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL"S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2

If

p'
i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship-"Communion
meditation." Rev. Middleton preaching.
9:00 and 10:00 A.M. Church School Classes.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
9:00 Morning Worship. "The Christian and
Self-Denial."
10:15 Sunday School.
5:45 Youth Groups.
7:00 Evening Service. "God's Social Register."
The Lord's Table.
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
and CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
H ilI St.at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Prof. Gerhard Lenski, Sociology
Dept., Speaker: "The Church: Institu-
tion or Movement?"
Friday-
8:15 P.M. Seminar on The Lutheran Lit-
urgy.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
SUNDAYS--
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 p.m. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 a.m. Holy Communion
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfasft at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a m Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
~riv 0n m to 5 . . xe m S nv

"4
4I

Summer occupancy. Efficiency
1-bedroom $65-$70, 2-bedroom
$90. NO 5-9405.

$55,
$85-
$12

Ann Arbor's
FINEST
Apa rtments
at
Moderate
Rentals
Schedule of Rentals:
Studio ................$ 98 to 126

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756

For RESULTS
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