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June 28, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY$ JUNE 28, 196I

THE MICHIGAN DAIT.V

.... ,

WEDNESDAYav aJUNE [28, a1961 t

PAGE FIVE

Redlegs Edge Cubs, 10-8'

*i

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Four Cincinnati
pinch batters produced two singles,
a walk, and a base-cleaning triple
as the Reds, came from behind to
defeat the Chicago Cubs 10-8 yes-
terday. It was the league-leaders'
11th victory in the past 13 games.
The Reds had two on and two
out in the seventh when veteran
Gus Bell blasted a run-making
pinch single. Gordy Coleman also
stroked a pinch single good for the
second run.
Rookie catcher John Edwards,
recalled from Indianapolis of the
American Association, was a guest
swinger for Jerry Zimmerman and
drew a base-filling walk.
Jerry Lynch then batted for Jay
Hook, second of Cincinnati's three
pitchers, and tripled to the foot
of the right field foul line to clear
the bases. It was Lynch's fourth
extra base hit good for 11 runs
batted in in six pinch hitting as-
signments against the Cubs this
season.
4' * *
Dodgers 9, Pirates 5
PITTSBURGH - The Los An-
geles Dodgers and the Pittsburgh
Pirates pounded out a total of 30
hits last night and the Dodgers
emerged from the free-swinging
contest with a 9-5 victory.
John Roseboro sparked the Dod-
gers' 16-hit attack with three
singles, a sacrifice fly and three
runs-batted-in. Jim Gilliam also
singled three times.
The Pirates collected 14 hits,
but couldn't catch the Dodgers in
the run department. Roberto Cle-
mente batted out four singles for
the Buccos.
Dick Farrell, the second of three
Dodger pitchers, was credited with
the victory, his sixth against five
defeats.
Pirate starter Bob Friend was
charged with the loss and is now
8-8.
The Dodgers got two runs off
Friend in the first inning and
chased him in the third when they
scored four runs on five hits, in-
cluding Norm Larker's two-run
double. .
The Dodger added single tallies
in the fourth, seventh and ninth.
* * *
Braves 3, Cards 0
ST. LOUIS - Bob Buhl pitched
a six-hit shutout and Eddie Ma-
thews hit a two-run home run,
giving the Milwaukee Braves a
3-0 victory over the St. Louis
Cardinals last night.
Buhl, in fine form, registered
his first whitewash of the season
to make his record 5-5.
About the only bright spot ir
the Redbirds' limp showing was
the performance of Star Musial,
who celebrated hih 10,000th time
at bat by hitting a double to cen-
ter field.
Only four players in history, Ty
Cobb, Tris Speaker, Honus Wag-
ner and Walter (Rabbit) Maran-
ville have gone over the 10,000.
mark in at bats.
Curt Simmons, the Card's hard-
luck left-hander, took the loss,
his seventh against only two vic-
tories. Simmons had two hits, both
of the infield variety, as he tried
to do something in his own behalf
for the punchless Cards.
Giants 12, Phils 5
PHILADELPHIA - The San
Francisco Giants overwhelmed the
Philadelphia Phillies 12-5 last
night as young Juan Marichal held

NO UPSETS:
14 Men, Four Women Score
IAt Wimbledon Championships

CLASSIFIEDSJ

N

them to four hits and no runs
through eight innings.
The Phils knocked him out of
the game with a five run ninth
inning rally.
The Giants scored a run in the
first inning off John Buzharct and
then kept piling it on as Marchi-
chal handcuffed the Phillies un-
til the ninth when he tired and
needed help from Stu Miller. It
was Marichal's fifth win in nine
decisions."
Orlando Cepeda had two singles
and a double to pace the Giants'
13-hit attack while Tom Haller

JERRY LYNCH
. . Redleg clutch hitter

It was the high-flying Sox' 18th
victory in 19 games.
Minoso's rightfield shot came
in the eighth off Paul Foytack
after the Tiger pitcher had sent
Detroit ahead 5-4 in the sixth with
a homerun.
Chicago jumped to a 4-0 lead,
but the Tigers tied it in the fifth
on Rocky Colavito's three-run
homer. It was Colavito's 20th.
* * *
Twins 6, Red Sox 5
ST. PAUL - MINNEAPOLIS -
Zorro Versalles blooped a single
into center field with the bases
loaded last night to give the Min-
nesota Twins a 6-5 victory over
the Boston Red Sox in the first
game of a doubleheader.
Versalles' two-run single with
two out in the eighth inning erased
a 5-4 Red Sox lead built in 'he
top of the frame on a run-scoring
single by reliew pitcher Mike For-
nieles, his first hit of the, season.
After the Red Sox took a 4-1
lead with a four-run sixth, the
Twins tied the score on pinch-
hitter Julio Becquer's two run
homer. It was his second home
and seventh safety in 12 pinch-
hitting appearances this season.
Danny McDevitt (2-2) picKed up
the victory in relief for the Twins
while Fornieles (5-4) took the loss.
* * *
Orioles 5, A's 3
KANSAS CITY - Baltimoic's
Mary Throneberry blasted a pair
of homers and a run scoring single
against his former Kansas City
teammates last night as thie Or-
ioles beat the Athletics 5-3 in the
first game of a double bill
Milt Pappas (4-3) was the win-
ning pitcher. He survived a three-
run rally by the A's in the second
inning but was replaced by Hoyt
Wilhelm in the eighth. The d6-
feat was charged to Ed Rakow who
relieved starter Norm Bass in the
second and struck out Thine-
berry with the bases loaded.
Major League
Stlandings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
(Not including Tuesday's games)
WV L Pct. GB
Detroit 45 24 .652 -
New York 44 25 .638 1
Cleveland 41 30 .577 5
Boston 36 33 .522 9
Baltimore 36 34 .514 9
Chicago 36 34 .514 9
Kansas City 29 38 .433 15
Washington 30 40 .42915%
Minnesota 26 43 .377 19
Los Angeles 25 47 .347 21
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 6, Detroit 5 (1st game, 2nd
inc..)
Minnesota 6, Boston 5 (1st game,
2nd inc.)
Baltimore 5, Kansas City 3 (1st
game, 2nd Inc.)
Washington 8, Cleveland 5
New York at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Detroit
New York at Los Angeles
Baltimore at Kansas City
Washington at Cleveland (2)
Boston at Minnesota
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Cincinnati 44 25 .638 -
Los Angeles 42 29 .592 3
San Francisco 39 30 .565 5
Pittsburgh 33 31 .516 $%2
Milwaukee 32 32 .500 9
St. Louis 30 37 .448 13
Chicago 25 41 .379 17
Philadelphia 22 42 .344192
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 9, Pittsburgh 5
Milwaukee 3, St. Louis 0
San Francisco 12, Philadelphia 5
Cincinnati 10, Chicago 8
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh (n)
Milwaukee at St. Louis (n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
Cincinnati at Chicago (2)

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

drove in three runs with a double
and single and Chuck Hiller, Willie
Mays and Willie McCovey all help-
ed themseves to a pair of safeties.
McCovey also scored three runs.
* * *
Senators 8, Indians 5
CLEVELAND - Catcher Gene
Green drove in five runs with two
homers and a single last night to
lead Washington to an 8-5 vic-
tory over the Cleveland Indians,
which snapped a 10-game losing
streak for the Senators.
Washington hammered three
consecutive homers in the first
inning to tie an American League
record. The clouts were by Green,
Willie Tasby and Dale Long. Chuck
Hinton, who reached first on a
fielder's choice, scored on Green's
blast into the upper left field
stands.
Green's second home run in the
seventh inning also scored Hinton,
who had walked. The Washington
catcher drove in his fifth run with
a single in the ninth inning.
Rookie right hander- Ed Ho-
baugh celebrated his 27th birthday
by picking up his fifth victory in
eight decisions. He was relieved by
Dave Sisled with out out in the
eighth after the Indians had scor-
ed three runs on three singles and
a double.
* * *
White Sox 6, Tigers 5
DETROIT - Minnie Minoso's
two-run homer, brought the Chi-
cago White Sox from behind for
their 11th straight victory last
night, a 6-5 decision over the
Detroit Tigers in the opener of
a twi-night doubleheader.

By The Associated Press
WIMBLEDON. England-Four-
teen American men and four
women yesterday advanced into
the second round .of the Wimble-
don Lawn Tennis championships
on a sunny day highlighted by
the fighting play of little Nancy
Richey.
Miss Richey, a tiny 19-year-old
Texan with a heart nearly as big
as the state, went on the center
court against second-seeded Aus-
tralian, Margaret Smith.
She lost her match but won
Wimbledon's heart.
The sellout crowd of 14,000
'Offer Full
I-MPro grain
A full schedule of activities will
be available for the sports-lover
during the summer session, Earl
Riskey, the University's intramur-
al director, announces.
Several softball leagues, com-
plete with playoffs, singles tour-
naments in several sports, open
swimming and a co-recreational
night each week will be featured
during the busy summer.
Riskey expects about 28 team
entries for the 1961 softball pro-
gram, about half of which will be
made up of faculty members. Ac-
tion will start the day after the
July 4 holiday and continue
through the, seventh week of
school-a total of six weeks of ac-
tion. However, Riskey points out
that entries must be turned into
the I-M building by June 30. These
may be made either appearing at
the I-M building or calling NO
3-4181.
Gaines Every Day
The games will be held each
weekday except Friday at South
Ferry Field, starting at 6:30 p.n,.
When entering, teams should
indicate a preference as to play-
ing days, and a schedule will be
drawn up to accommodate prefer-
ences as closely as possible.
Umpires are urgently needed
for the softball league, Riskey
adds. Any interested persons
should contact the I-M building.
Riskey plans an extensive tour-
nament program for individuals
desiring competition in some of
the minor sports. Included in the
projected program are singles
tourneys in golf, tennis, handball,
squash, badminton, and horse-
shoes. Dates for these tourneys
will not be announced until later
in the summer, but interested par-
ticipants are encouraged to con-
tact the I-M building.
Pool Open
For the water lover, the I-M
swimming pool will be reserved
for male students from 4-5:30
each weekday. Faculty members
will get a chance to take a dip
from 11:45-1 daily except Satur-
day and Sunday.
The I-M building will be open
for all to enjoy from 8 a.m. until
6 p.m., Monday through Friday.
The co-recreational program
will be held every Wednesday eve-
ning from 7:30-10 p.m. and will
include various activities for both
male and female participants,
some of which will be badminton,
volleyball, swimming, and paddle-
ball.
The first co-rec night is sched-
uled for tomorrow.

basking in the sun rose to the
two girls, both making their first
appearance at Wimbledon. Nan-
cy, poker-faced and wearing a
long-peaked eyeshade, took the
first set-and an upset looked in
the making.
But the strong Australian girl
pulled the match around, leveled
it at one set all and prevailed 3-6,
6-3, 6-4, as she pinned the girl
from San Angelo to the baseline.
A roar of cheers for both girls
went up from the packed galleries
at the end of the match.
Miss Richey's match was the
one that had the crowds roaring
the loudest and- longest at this
tennis factory on the outskirts of
London where play went on non-
stop for seven hours. The last
matches were completed as twi-
light began to fall.
Charles (Chuck) McKinley and
Karen Hantze, the only two seed-
ed Americans, breezed through
their matches to spearhead the
American challenge.
McKinley, a muscular 20-year-
old from St. Louis used all his
power and strength to defeat Ital-
ian Davis Cupper Sergei Tacchini
6-2, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4. The aggressive

young Yank, with a booming
service, overhead smash and light-
ning volleys, never played a safe
shot. All the time it was power,
power and more power.
Miss Hantze, the 18-year-old
No. 2 ranked American from Chu-
la Vista, Calif., coasted to a 6-2,
6-2 victory over Mrs. Rosa Dar-
mon of Mexico.
McKinley and Miss Hantze both
are seeded eighth. All the seeds
in the singles got through their
opening matches without being
extended.
Once again, for his 14th Wim-
bledon. 47-year-old Gardnar Mul-
loy drew the crowds for his
match against John Ward of Eng-
land. Mulloy, of Coral Gables,
Fla., defeated his 27-year-old op-
ponent 6-2, 6-8, 1-6, 6-4, 6-4 to
the delight of Wimbledon fans
who have been watching him for
years.
All of America's top men got,
through to the next round on a
shock-free day. Among the win-
ners were Jon Douglas of Santa
Monica, Calif.; Whitney Reed of
Alameda, Calif., Donald Dell of
Bethesda, Md., and Chris Craw-
ford, Piedmont, Calif.

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
.80

S

.96
1.12
Figvre 5 average words to a line.

Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

FOR RENT
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17
PARKING SPACE behind Campus The-
atre. $5.50/month. NO 3-4322. C7
CAMPUS-furnished three-room apart-
ment, private bath. Call NO 2-7365.
C2
CAMPUS 4-room furnished apartment
for summer, suitable for 2 or 3 boys.
NO 3-4322. 06
3-ROOM furnished apartment with pri-
vate bath and washing facilities. NO
3-8458. C13
WANTED-female roommate to share
apartment for summer. Near campus.
NO 5-4574. 018
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fall semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. C16
GRAD GIRLS-,Double rooms in attrac-
tive apt. 718 Lawrence. Full use kit-
chen and living room. $35/month per
girl. Call NO 5-5125 or NO 3-0787. C5
CAMPUS-2 blocks. Two-bedroom apt.
suitable for 4 adults. First floor at
reduced rate for summer. NO 3-4062.
C11
VERY PLEASANT ROOM 2 blocks from
campus, 1 block from eating places.
Cross ventilation, quiet shadystreet.
Phone 3-4685. 1320 Forest Court. C8
NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. 09
CAMPUS - Attractive apartment fur-
nished for one adult. No garage. $75
a month. Prefer year-around occu-
pancy. NO 2-7395. C1
MEN-Share a house located on the
finest beach on Whitmore Lake. Water
skiing Included. YOU HAVE TO SEE
IT TO BELIEVE IT. Call HI 92387
after 7 p.m. 015
FURNISHED University-operated apart-
ments available to married students
and married faculty for summer
session. Leases available on short
term basis. Call NO 2-3169 or apply
University Apartments Office, 2364
Bishop St. Office open Mon. through
Sat. C14
CAMPUS APTS.
Summer occupancy. Efficiency $55,
1-bedroom $65-$70, 2-bedroom $85-
$90. NO 5-9405. 012
BUSINESS SERVICES

BARGAIN CORNER
ENGLISH BIKE - Boy's Lightweii
Centaur. Like new, with brand n
tires. $25. Call NO 2-4736.
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: sh
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; k
sport shirts $1.99; wash-n-wear sla
$2.77; many other big buys-Sarl
Store, 122 E. Washington.
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORI
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and model
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sale.
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
C-TED STANDARD SERVIC
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessorl
Complete Automotive Service-Al1
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
PERSONAL
THERE'S NO PLACE like the Schwab
Inn for a Schwabenburger! 215 Ashl
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOE
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO.2-183
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in-any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL'S

FUN AND RELAXATION--That's what Sailing Club members
have when they take their fleet of sloops out on Base Line Lake
on weekends. The club will hold an open weekend this Saturday
and Sunday for all interested persons and prospective members.
INTRODUCTORY MEETING:
SailingClub Plans
'Open Weekend'

PECIAL
EN-DAY
RATE
.39
.47
.54

ght
ew
ort
nit
cks
ails
W2
ES
a
S
87
les.
81
en
ey.
F;
S
4
X3
37
Os
X2
in
na-
Hi
om
:3 t.
H2
ho-
ur.
een
911

/
'A'

CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Most frames replaced
while you wait.
Broken lenses duplicated
FAST service on all repairs.

323 S. Main

NO 2-56E

U U

New Shipments
of
USED and NEW
Summer Session.
TEXTBOOKS
arriving daily!

Lund Pilots Huron Nine
In Basin League A ction

Coach Don Lund, who piloted
the Wolverine baseball team to a
Big Ten championship and a Dis-
trict Four NCAA playoff berth,
and Moby Benedict, his able as-
sistant, will be battling each other
this summer as they assume roles
of rival managers in the NCAA-
approved Basin League in South
Dakota.
Lund wil manage Huron, while
Benedict will act as player-man-
ager of Winner.
Accompanying Lund to Huron
will be several members of his
championship team, including
pitchers Mike Joyce and Fritz
Fisher, second baseman Joe Jones,
and third baseman Joe Merullo.
Merullo is expected to return to
his first love-catching-since Bill
Freehan, originally counted upon
by Lund to handle the receiving
duties, has turned pro.
Roebuck Also Going
Ed Roebuck, a fireballing pitch-
er, will also make the trip. Roe-
buck is a transfer from Wheaton,
and is being counted on to add
depth to the Wolverine pitching
staff next year.
Benedict will have no Wolverines
with him, but he will be taking
along a couple of stars from De-
troit, including Frank Corej, an

One of the nicest features of
summertime living in Ann Arbor
is the informality and easy-going
pacewhich everyone, from lowly
student on up to lordly faculty-
administration, seems to fall into
at the end of the spring semester.
Proof of this can be found al-
most any day out at Base Line
Lake, headquarters for the Uni-
versity of Michigan Sailing Club.
With facilities for sailing, swim-
ming. ,picnicking and just loaf-
ing around, the Club is popular
with both University community
and Ann Arbor townsfolk.
To get the summer session offi-
cially under way, the Club will
offer an introductory program to-
night at 7:30 in the Union Ball-
room, highlighted by a series of
slides depicting its year-round ac-
tivities.
The club owns a fleet of eight
Jet 14 sloops and an MIT dinghy;
and, since many who sail are not
seasoned salts, there is a motor-
powered crash boat to aid cap-
sized or swamped boats.
For those who feel they are
somewhat less than expert sailors,
the club offers both a "boat
school" and a "shore school." The
latter is held Thursday evenings,
and includes general sailing theory
and basic seamanship. To put in-
to practice what he learns at a
shore school, the novice will go out
on Saturday morning with an ex-
perienced skipper and put a boat
through the basic maneuvers,
gradually building up enough skill
and confidence to take a boat out
by himself.
For those who have mastered
the elementary skills, the Sunday
morning racing series offers a
challenge-as either skipper or
crew, the more experienced sailors

As a sample of what the club
offers, this Saturday and Sunday
will be "open weekend" at the
lake-anyone interested may come
out; during the rest of the sum-
mer, the club facilities are re-
stricted to members and their
guests.
Anyone with no transportation
wishing to take advantage of the
open weekend can consult the
Sailing Club poster by theUnion
grill aftertoday; rides are listed
for the entire week, and all leave
from the north door of the Union.

240 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 2-9116 NO 8-6019
J3
VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF
RALPH'S MARKET
Picnic supplies
Party foods
Kitchen utensils
Kosher foods
709 Packard-open till midnightJ
J2
WANTED
WANTED TO BUY OR RENT, cash
terms, 16mm. movie camera. NO.
3-2069. BBI

the home of Steinway plan
HELP WANE ED
STUDENT TEACHER interested
helping child with muscle coordir
tion. NO 3-5065.
DIXIELAND DRUMMER-Contact T
Lough, NO 3-0807 or University E
421W days.
MALE SUBJECTS wanted for psycY
logical experiment. Pay $1.25/ho
Call Susan Karp, NO 3-8283 betwe
5 and 7 p m. or University Ext. 2
between 9 a.m. and noon.
Read
Daily
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' : .:::3:.. ........:. >::%fC..,.....:::'s ! .:r;}S ..::.*..}..^: '%.'' ''4 C':.. ' '" "';" # z''' .'i:44f. .
ATTENTION
rzPHOTOGRAPHERS!
An opportunity to con-
tribute to one of the
country's most outstand-
ing publications. Mone-
tary incentive too!

:.:t.:
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for those hard-to-f ind
TEXT BOOKS
nli.A/nvch liv nti-

DON LUND
... goes to Huron

Benedict, who played shortstop
here under Ray Fisher, will prob-
ably return to his old position at
Winner. Fisher rated Benedict as

I

,

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