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August 04, 1961 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-08-04

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'AGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUGUST' 4, 1961

'AGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. ATTCTT1~4T 4 191~I

ai avaa./ax.a) i1V R.AV .7 i. My iVUJL

ColaNvito Homer Sen ators

TIGERS SWAP:
KC's Bertoia, Staley Traded

By The Associated Press
DETROIT (P) - Jim Bunning's
four-hit pitching and Rocky Cola-
vito's 30th home run enabled the
Detroit Tigers to defeat the Wash-
ington Senators 2-1 today.
Winning for the seventh time in
his last nine decisions, Bunning
kept four singles well spaced,
struck out six and walked only
two in nailing down his 12th vic-
tory in 20 decisions.
Colavito's home run, a vicious
liner into the lower left field seats,
came when he led off the fourth
inning and gave Bunning the cdge
in a tense pitching duel with Ben-
nie Daniels. Daniels allowed seven
hits in the seven innings he work-
ed. Johnny Klippstein finished.
* * *
Braves 5, Cubs 2
CHICAGO (P) - Ernie Banks
banged out his 19th home run in
the ninth inning yesterday to spoil
Lew Burdette's one-hit shutout as
the Milwaukee Braves defeated the
Chicago Cubs, 5-2.
With one out in the ninth, Frank
Bolling and Joe Adcock permitted
Al Heits's high pop fly to drop
between them in the Milwaukee
bullpen behind first base. Given
this life, Heist hammered the
Cub's second hit, a single to cen-
ter.
Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Cincinnati 66 40 .623 -
x-Los Angeles 62 39 .614 1/
x-San Francisco 55 46 .545 8/
Milwaukee 52 48 .520 11
Pittsburgh 46 49 .484 14
St. Louis 48 53 .475 151/
Chicago 43 58 .426 20%/
Philadelphia 30 69 .303 32%2
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 19, St. Louis 0
Cincinnati 7, Philadelphia 1
Milwaukee 5, Chicago 2
Los Angeles at San Francisco (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia (Ferrarese 2-7) at St.
Louis (Broglio 7-10) (n)
Pittsburgh (Gobbon 8-6) at Cincin-
nati (Purkey 13-5) (n)
Chicago (Anderson 4-7) at Los An-
geles (Koufax 13-6) (n)
Milwaukee (Spahn 10-12) at San
Francisco (McCormick 9-9) (n)
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Then Banks blasted his homer
into the left centerfield bleacher
seats on Burdette's first pitch for
the Cub's only runs.
* * *
Orioles 3, Twins 0
BALTIMORE-Hal Brown ex-
tended his scoreless inning streak
to 32 last night as the Baltimore
Orioles whipped the Minnesota
Twins 3-0.
Baltimore scored all of its runs
in the eighth inning on a walk,
two singles and a base-clearing
throwing error by Minnesota
pitcher Jim Kaat.
Dick Williams walked to open
the inning and moved to second
on a single by Ron Hansen. With
the Minnesota infield looking for
a bunt, Mary Breeding bounced a
hit to left, scoring Williams'
When left fielder Joe Altobel-
li's throw sailed over catcher Hal
Naragon's head, Kaat fielded it
and threw the ball into left cen-
ter, allowing both Hansen and
Breeding to -score.
* * a
Red Sox 4, Angels 0
BOSTON-Rookie righthander
Don Schwall spaced three hits
last night and hurled the Boston
Red Sox to their fourth straight
victory, a 4-0 decision over. Los
Angeles.
It was the sixth consecutive
pitching victory for the brilliant
youngster, and pushed his record
to 12-2 since joining the Sox May
21. It was his second major league
shutout.
* * *
White Sox 8, Indians 6
CLEVELAND - The Chicago
White Sox, capitalizing on an er-
ror, scored two unearned runs and
beat the Cleveland Indians, 8-6,
last night.
Chicago scored the winning runs
in the ninth inning. With two on,
relief pitcher Don Laeson bunted
and pitcher Frank Funk threw
wild in an attempt to get J. C.
Martin at third. Martin, who had
singled, and Camilo Carreon, who
had walked, scored.
Bubba Phillips but Cleveland out
front 4-0 in the first inning with

a grand slam into the left field
stands, his'1*th homer of the sea-
son.
* * *
Athletics 6, Yankees 1
NEW YORK-Bob Shaw, pitch-
ing his best game since acquired
from Chicago two months ago,
handcuffed New York's power hit-
ters with six hits last night as
the Kansas City Athletics defeat-
ed the Yankees 6-1.
Kansas City's triumph, in its
last game of the season at Yan-
kee Stadium, narrowed the Yan-
kee's first place lead to a game
and a half over Detroit.
' * * *
Pirates 19, Cardinals 0
ST. LOUIS - The Pittsburgh
Pirates bombarded St. Louis with
a major league season high of 24
hits last night behind Harvey
Haddix and buried the Cardinals
19-0, tying the modern National

League record for highest score
in a shutout game.
Roberto Clemente, Smoky Bur-
gess, Dick Stuart and Bill Maz-
eroski were the big guns as the
world champs broke out of a five-
game tailspin with a vengeance
and moved back into fifth place.
* * . *
Reds 7, Philles 1
CINCINNATI-The Cincinnati

Reds clung to their first place
position in the National League
last night as they cut loose with a
15-hit attack to whip the Phila-
delphia Phils for the 15th straight
time this season, 7-1.
Ken Johnson, bidding to become
a regular fifth starter for the
Reds, gave up nine hits but kept
them well scattered as he won his
second game since joining Cincin-1
nati only July 21.1

DETROIT (R) - Manager Bob
Scheffing thinks his Detroit Ti-
gers still can make a serious run
for the American League pennant
despite injuries that have side-
lined two regulars and bothered
the effectiveness of two pitchers.
The Tigers acquired third base-
man Reno Bertoia and relief
pitcher Gerry Staley from the
Kansas City Athletics last night
and Scheffing said both will be
used extensively.

t
Frank Lane general manager of Fernndez and first baseman Bobo
the Athletics said it was not an Osborne in Boros' place but has
earth-shaking deal the one that In hon hn wt.
tUL bAI hkJp With LLLh

flea tty, Budd Lead Americans;
,'11' Tankers Bid for Honors

sent relief pitcher Bill Fischer,
utility man Ozzie Virgil and an
undisclosed amount of cash to
Kansas City.
"It may not be very important
to the Athletics," said Scheffing,
"but it could be real earth-shaking
to us - if Bertoia and Staley do
a job for us."
Scheffing has been disgusted
with his players in the last week
while they were losing five of their
last seven games. His bullpen has
been almost totally ineffective and
the club has been in a general
hitting slump.
The misfortunes could not have
come at a more inopportune time
for the Tigers, the cinderella team
that has led the American League
pennant race most of the season.
The Tigers recently lost third
baseman Steve Boros with a
broken collarbone and catcher
Dick Brown with a broken finger.
Scheffing tried shortstop Chico

nDU een naPPy WM Lose
switches. Now the job belongs to
Bertoia, a 26-year-old who got a
$30,000 bonus from the Tigers in
1953 and has had trouble finding
a regular job since.
"I've said all along we'd stay
close to the top if we stayed
healthy, and now we're not
healthy," said Scheffing, whose
team dropped 21/ games off the
pace last night by splitting with
Washrington while the New York
Yankees were winning two.
Staley, 40, will be used "as
frequently as he can work," ac-
cording, to Scheffing, who used
four relief pitchers without any
success in Wednesday night's sec-
ond game loss. "I figure the guys
we're getting will be better than
what we've had recently. Our club
needs a picker-upper to stay in
there, and we're counting on these
new men to provide that lift. If
they can't, we're get along as
best we can."

GOTEBORG, Sweden 0P)-Miler
Jim Beatty and Sprinter Frank
Budd led an American contingent
to five victories in an internation-
al track and field meet last night.
Beatty, of San Jose, Calif.,
opened up in the last 500 meters
and defeated Sweden'sDan Waern
in the 1,500 meter feature in
3:44.8. Waern was timed in 3:45.5.
Mike Wiggs of England was third
in 3:48.8.
Budd of Villanova easily cap-
tured the 100-meter sprint with a
fine time of 10.2 seconds. Harry
Jerome of Canada was second in
:10.3.
The other American winners
were broad jumper Ralph Boston,
quartermiler Earl Young and
half-miler Jerry Siebert.
Boston, the Olympic champion
and world record holder from Ten-
nessee State, leaped 25 feet 11/4
inches. Young, of San Fernando,
Calif., took the 400-meter run in
47.3 seconds. Siebert, of Willits,
Calif., sprinted in the stretch and
won the 800 meters in 1:52.4.

Canada's Don Bertoia was second
in 1:53.2.
M * M 3
ONTARIO-Dick Gretzinger, a
recent graduate of Plymouth High
School and possible Michigan

prospect, broke a second Canadian
Open record by winning the 200-
yard butterfly final in 2:13.1. Carl
Zahn of Tulsa, Okla. was second.
Gretzinger cracked the 400-yard
individual medley mark Tuesday
night in the 25-yard pool.

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'til 11:30 A.M.

HAL BROWN
.. . 32 runless innings

GOLF TOURNEY:
Lemra, Venturi Top
Eastern Open Field

USED CARS
1958 FORD convertible, automatic trans-
mission, radio, heater. Excellent con-
dition. $1200. Call Chuck, days 8-7874.
evenings 5-6384. N6
'52 FORD, 2-door, V-8, R and H. Good
transportation. $195. NO 3-7613 eves.
N7
JIM WHITE CHEVROLET
USED CARS
1960 CADILLAC, 62 two-door coupe,
full power, beige with match-
ing interior, $3895.
1956 Chevrolet, 2-door station wag-
on, 6 cylinder, standard shift,
radio and heater, light blue
and white, $695.
1958 Chevrolet Impala, 2-door, hard-
top, V-8, power glide, radio
and heater, silver blue with
white walls, $1395.
19:4 Ford, $195.
2 locations-downtown, Huron at First;
University lot, washington at Division
HELP WANTED
TWO WOMEN NEEDED for telephone
work in downtown office of local dry
cleaners. Interesting work. Guaran-
teed salary. Two shifts available. Tel.
NO 2-9546. H16
TYPIST two afternoons per week. In-
dependent real estate office. $1.75 per
hour. Sales people also needed. Com-
mission only. Prefer experienced per-
son. Call NO 3-9373. H14
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GR1INN ELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
.70
.85
1.00

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
.58
.70
.83
to a line
3:00 Mon. thru Fri.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Figure 5 average words
Call Classified between 1 :00 and

Phone NO 2-4786

BUSINESS SERVICES
Having guests over this
weekend?
Serve them the very best
Ann Arbor has to offer
SHOP AT
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
JO
SUSTERKA
LAKE
,.Private swimming parties
Hall rental
Hayride and pizzaride
Horseback riding daily
Call DON BASTEDO,
HU 3-5010
J19
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
FOR SALE
1956 SPORTSMAN mobile home, 33 ft.
by 8 ft. $1600. Ideal for couple, Pull
bath. Clean. NO 3-4016 or Hickory 9
2306. B13
BY OWNER, will sacrifice: 2-bedroom
ranch, oak floors, storms and screens,
garage, fenced yard. Located at 1126
Hawthorne, Ypsilanti. Key at 1040
Olivia, Ann Arbor. Terms available.
No reasonable offer will be refused.
Reply Box 104, Michigan Daily. B12
PERSONAL
PROCLAMATION from 512: Madame
Curie has produced radium, thorium,
and Polonium. P18

New York
Detroit
Baltimore
Cleveland
Chicago
Boston
Minnesota
Washington
Los Angeles
Kansas Pity

W
67
66
60
56
53
50
46
46
45
38

L
37
39.
47
51
54
58
58
59,
60
65

Pet. GB
.644 -
.629 1%/
.561 8%
.523 12/
.495 151,
.463 19
.442 21
.442 21
.429 221
.369 28/

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 2, Washington 1
Boston 4, Los Angeles 0
Kansas City 6, New York 1
Baltimore 3, Minnesota 0
Chicago 8, Cleveland 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota (Pascual 8-12) at New
York (Stafford 9-5) (n)
Kansas City (Walker 4-7) at Boston
(Monbouquette 8-9) (n)
Los Angeles (Bowsfield 7-3 and Grba
5-10) at Baltimore (Fisher 4-10
and Barber 12-8) (2) (t-n)
Cleveland (Latman 9-2) at Detroit
(Lary 14-6) (n)

BALTIMORE (W) - Tony Lema
chipped the ball into the cup from
35 feet away on the 12th hole for
an eagle three today that en-
abled him to tie his California
golfing buddy, Ken Venturi, for
the first round lead in the $35,-
oo Eastern Open at four strokes
under par.
The two San Francisco Bay
golfers, who look enough alike to
be brothers, fashioned their
rounds of 68 with scores of 34 on
each of the nine holes at the
6,820-yard Pine Ridge Course.
The 30-year-old Venturi first+
posted his 68, based on half a
dozen birdies and a pair of bogeys.
The 27-year old Lema, a great ad-
mirer of Venturi after playing
with him at the San Francisco
Country Club, matched it 10

minutes later with four birdies,
two bogeys and his crucial eagle.
At the 507-yard long 12th, Lema
smacked a 3-iron shot to the edge
of the green and chipped into the
hole to gain two precious strokes
on par.
Venturi and Lema enjoyed a
one-stroke lead over their near-
est pursuers among the 138 start-
ers in the 72-hole tournament
that will wind up Sunday.
Doug Ford, the veteran bulldog
from Crestwood, N.Y., and Rex
Baxter Jr., novice pro from Ama-
rillo, Tex., lodged themselves in
the runner-up spot with scores
of 69.
Gene Littler, the defending
champion from Singing Hills,
Calif., got off the turf for a come-
back 70 that tied him with several
others at the 70 standard. Littler
was two strokes behind par after
nine holes but reeled off four
straight birdies on the 11th
through the 14th to remain in
contention.

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."'
1220 South University .
NO 8-9168
S1
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE I
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
87
FOR RENT
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17

BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.44; wash-n-wear slacks
2.77; many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W2
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS Norfolk Aug. 19, return Labor
Day. NO 3-9434. G6
RIDE WANTED to Atlanta, Georgia, on
August 17. Will share driving and gas
costs. Phone 663-7024. G5

Read
Daily
Classifieds

ROCKY COLAVITO
... number 30

TI

Presented by THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
1961-62 Season
CHORAL UNION SERIES
GEORGELONDON, Bass.............................Wed, Oct. 4
THE ROGER WAGNER CHORALE . ................Thurs., Oct. 19
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA .............2:30, Sun., Oct. 22
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA.... ....... . .Fri., Nov. 3
HERBERT VON KARAJAN, Conductor
BAYANIHAN (Philippine Songs and Dances).........Mon., Nov. 6
YEHUDI MENUHIN, violinist ................2:30, Sun., Nov.-12
GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA, Soprano .................Tues., Nov. 21
EMIL GILELS, Pianist .........................Tues., Feb. 13
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA..........2:30, Sun., Mar. 4
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, COnductor
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE ...................... Sat., March 24
Season Tickets: $20.00-$17.00-$15.00-$12.00-$10.00
EXTRA SERIES

the

ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
home of Steinway pianos available for summerand fall semes-
X2 ters. NO 2-1443. C16

Where

to

Dine

Good food . .

. expertly served, in pleasant

surroundings, to the most exacting taste.
Luncheons, 11:30 to 2:00 Dinners, 5:30 to 7:30
Sunday: Dinners, 12:00 to 3:00 Closed Mondays

i

.L

2

he
CCHUCK WAGON
LUNCHES and DINNERS
FINE SALADS and SANDWICHES
Specializing in Roast Beef
Serving Wines and Beers from all over the world
QUICK LUNCH SERVICE
recommended by Duncan Hines and Gourmet
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE
OPEN 7 DAYS
2045 Packard Hours 11 A.M.-9 P.M. NO 2-1661
LARRY DAVIS, Proprietor

g ' . -4
.

We suggest that you telephone
for reservations.
V&e Corner Jloe
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A block west of Rackham Bldg-NO8-6056

Xn
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.................... ........ ........1:t................................................ ............... ................. ............ .. .................. h.........,,............. .....

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MAZOwSZE (Polish Songs and Dances) . .
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA ........ ..... .
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist ................
BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCHESTRA .............
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor
I V. Tl r E' Pr W I (N--- j -;n ? *r - - -- -

..... .Tues., Oct. 24
... Thurs., Nov. 16
......on., Nov. 27
. .2:30, Sun., Feb. 18
Mon ..M2ar. 12

J:":
}

u aiya

:;': ;
:
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1

u FRESH
WHOLE
LOBSTER
Drawn butter, 1%2 lb.
{ average from the East

FINE
SEAFOOD

.Conink/ a ifhfl9

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