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August 04, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-08-04

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 4,1961

THE MICHIGAN DIAILY

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DIAL
NO 8-6416
"Master

[I'f M NOW

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Texas Regents Withhold
Minority Group Report

Public
Relations

r's touchm.-aof
Bergman's extraordinary
talents are on display.
'Dreams' is a beautifully
constructed composition."
-Newsweek
Bergman has seldom
said anything in a more
vigorous and suitable
style. Shrewdly ironic...
lewdly hilarious." -Time

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
. I . V::~ ;'y.. +,: ' j" F'r:. ".,, S

i

The regents of the Universityv
of Texas are holding back a report
on minority groups on campus
which approves further integra-
tion on the campus.
The regents received the report
last week before they unanimously
decided to hold back desegrega-
tion of university athletics and
dormitories.
The report, prepared by a com-
mittee headed by Prof. Harry
Ransom, deals specifically with
the case of Negro students at the
university. Prof. E. Ernest Gol-
stein, a member of the committee,I
wants to make the report's con-
tents known now.
According to him, "The report
makes very clear the legal and
moral obligations had by state-
supported school."
The regents chose to stop de-
segregation attempts because they
felt the people of Texas and their
legislative representatives were
opposed to them.
Their wishes, the regents said,
must be taken into consideration
as well as "members of the faculty
and student body, in whom an ac-
tive minority does not always
speak the-wishes of a majority . .
Prof. Goldstein said, "We were
the only group on campus devoted
to finding facts. This isn't a popu-
larity contest. A very clear moral
duty is involved."
A suit against the university's
"discriminatory" policies may be
filed soon, Daily Texan Editor
Hoyt Purvis reports. "Some Ne-
gro students had the suit planned
several months ago, but decided.
not to file in view of expected im-
provements. However, the regents'
statement has changed all that."
* * *
AUSTIN-Student body presi-

dent at the University of Texas,'
Maurice Olian, has issued a call
for aid from every university stu-
dent to defeat the legislature's
proposed bill raising tuition $25 a
semester.
"The reaction 'of individual ci-
tizens very definitely could be
the determining factor in decid-
ing the fate of the possible in-
crease in tuition rates," Olian
told the students, asking them to
urge their parents to contact leg-
islators, also.
Students at the Texas' 19 state-
supported schools and colleges now
pay $50 a semester.
Olian claims to represent 90,-
000 students enrolled in the state's
public colleges and universities.
Almost 40 per cent of Texas' stu-
dents are enrolled in private in-
stitutions and average over $400 a
year in tuition.
* *,*
MINNEAPOLIS - A dozen Uni-
versity of Minnesota students
picketed a United States Army
recruiting station for nearly an
hour Monday.
They were demonstrating against
President John F. Kennedy's call
for an arms build-up over the
Berlin question, and what one
called "mobilization diplomacy."
This sort of diplomacy "may
force Russia-into a position where
she must fight or lose face," Mi-
chael Klein, a graduate student,
said. "Possibilities for a fair settle-
ment exist."
The recruiting station, symbolic
target of the demonstration, re-
mained "dark and empty" during
the picketing. About 500 leaflets
were passed out to."spectators pass-
ing by the picketers, who carried
hand-lettered signs.

- {
ABOVE is scooped
neck - muted striped
beauty in tones of
blues & greens.
A "TRUDY JUNIOR"-
SIZES 5-15
at 14.98
You'll find
sensational buys
in our I/2 Year
M Off Sale
of Dresses

a stunning collection to wear
now-all thru fall and winter.
You'll be delighted with the
wide selection of styles and at
their tiny price tags.
Budget Cottons
from 10.95
Better Dresses
and Costumes,
Cottons and Blends
from 17.95 to 39.95

POST NO BILLS-Workmen
in the Administration Bldg.
have found their construction
sites enlivened by the humor
and interdepartmental memos
of the University Relations
office. This wood wall - being
used for work near the News
Service office on the third
floor - drew comments fron
men who are or purport to be:
Michael Radock Director of
University Relations; Cleland
Wyllie head of News Service;
Wono Lee a staff member of
News Service and two anony-
mous fellows.
The pencilled-in comments
about the main decoration in-
clude an order to stop de-
facing the property, a cryp-
tic questioning of authority,
a short apology and a terse
view that the whole affair is
"disgusting."

~Calls Works
Idealization
Of Old Life
Southern Authors
Avoid Main Issues
By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
The outstanding feature of
Southern literature in the back-
wash of therCivil War was an
idealization of the romantic ante-
bellum South.
In a talk concluding a lecture
series commemorating the Civil
War centennial, Prof. Arlin Tur-
ner, chairman of the Duke Uni-
versity English department traced
the development of Southern lit-
erature following the signing of
peace.
Southerners Qualified
Because the battles were fought
on Southern soil, Prof. Turner ex-
plained, all Southerners felt ready
and qualified after the armistice
to write poems and novels glorify-
ing the lost Confederate cause.
Short-lived Southern magazines
were deluged with the contribu-
tions of patriotic Southerners.
The good Southern authors,
however, soon found that their
best markets were in the North.
They renewed pre-war friendships
with Northern writers and began,
sending their work to publishers
in New York and Boston.
Avoid Controversy
While their writing was readily
received, it became necessary for
the Southern writers to avoid all
really controversial questions in
their treament of the Civil War
and follow a theme of glorification
of the graceful life of the old
plantations.
A few Southerners, notably
George W. Cable, preferred to look
forward to a better future and
acknowledge the past mistakes of
the Confederacy.
But Southerners condemned
such writing and Northern editors,
who wanted only literature ad-
vancing the cause of reconcilia-
tion, discouraged it.
Tradition Begins
Thus began the long tradition of
escapism in Southern literature
and urgent social, moral and poli-
tical questions of reconstruction
were ignored.
Prof. Turner explained that this
pattern was never effectively bro-
ken until Southern authors such
as William Faulkner and Thomas
Wolfe established "a new pattern
within which an entire school of
younger authors . . . has produced
the most vital prose fiction on
the American scene today."
Prof. Turner's lecture was the
penultimate event of the Summer
Session's series on the Civil War.
A panel discussion on Civil War
literature was held last night.

The Regents granted several
leaves of absence at their meet-
ing last week.
They included:
Prof. V. C. Hough will take a
semester's leave startnig in Feb.
1962 to continue development of
an analysis system for the bubble
chamber pictures at Brookhaven
National Laboratories.
Institute Post
Prof. George H. Lauff of the
zoology department will take a
semester's leave starting in Feb.
1962 to accept a temporary ap-
pointment as director of the Uni-
versity of Georgia Marine Insti-
tute.
Librarian Margery M. Owen has
been granted sick leave from May
29-July 26.
Prof. Lawrence L. Rauch of the
department or aeronautical and
astronautical engineering will
take half-time leave next year in
order to do research and consult.
Prof. Nelson W. Spencer of the
electrical engineering department
will take a year's leave beginning
in September to work with the
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration.
Jean C. Waterland, instructor of
physical education for women at
the University, will take leave
during the second semester of
next year to work on an advanced
degree.
They also made two appoint-
Two Students
From 'U' Plan
Soviet Studies
Two University graduate stu-
dents are among 37 persons who
will be exchange scholars in the
Soviet Union during the upcoming
academic year, it was announced
yesterday.
Carl Proffer, a graduate stu-
dent in Slavic languages and lit-
eratures, will attempt to increase
his proficiency in Russian lan-
guage. He will also begin research
on Gogol during the second se-
mester at Moscow State Univer-
sity.
Margaret Spencer, who is study-
ing language and literature, will
do research in teaching spoken
Russian during an academic year
at Leningrad State University.
The Inter-University Committee
on Travel Grants, compromising
31 American universities, ar-
ranged the exchanges. In all, 48
Soviet students are expected to
attend 24 American universities
during the 1961-62 academic year.
The committee administers the
exchange of scholars between the
United States and the Soviet
Union.

Grant Leaves of Absence,
Make New Appointments

ments on the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics.
Prof. Joseph E. Kallenback will
continue and Prof. Lewis N. Hol-
land wil succeed Reed M. Nesbit
on the Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics.
Other gifts and grants which
were approved included:
From the Square D. Company
for two scholarships.
Kahn Scholarship
From Albert Kahn Associated
Architects and Engineers Foun-
dation for a graduate scholarship
in architecture.
From the Institute of Radio
Engineers, Inc. to cover secretarial
expenses that will be incurred in
the IRE Professional Electronic
Computers Editorship for Prof.
Norman R. Scott of the electrical
engineering department.
All other gifts accepted by the
Regents were for less than $1,000.
DIAL NO 2-6264
COLUMBIA PIOCURES presents
DA[D NUEN
ANIHOY QUINN
THsu-iafiJrqSA11YBAKER-AN1THONY MY[[
PIN[ PAPAS 6IASCA[R4AbES DARKEN
.. COLOR and CINEASCOP ;
PLEASE NOTE!
4 Shows Daily
at 1:00 - 3:30 - 6:15
and 9:05
3an :

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The sizes: 7-15, 10-20,
1212-24V1/

.5
i:(
ti.

ON FOREST
off corner of
S. University
opposite
Campus Theatre
PARKING AT REAR
OF STORE

Friday and Saturday till 1 P.M. Special
Huge group of COOL COTTONS
7.49
ALL TYPES--AND SIZES
1V f: S ?:. .;r.SS }'a ny' iJ"":L1'""::". . 4. "..}v:'::{C7S tv{f}",:"4l""Jat{}J":: ::C:}$Y"{ , 4
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44
:AN OLACE
byg

fabic '1.anoin
b{\'"" So easy t

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
FRIDAY,.AUGUST 4, 1961
General Notices
Master's Breakfast. Students who will
be candidates for the Master's Degree
at the close of the current Summer
Session will be honored at the tradi-
tional Master's Breakfast on Sunday
morning, August 6, at 9 o'clock in the,
ballroom of the Michigan Union.
Tickets may be received at 4507 Ad-
ministration Building, until 4 p.m.
Friday, August 4. Additional tickets
for guestsuareuavailable at $1.60teach.
Book Sale to University staff 'and
Students at the Undergraduate Library
Fourth Floor, Aug. 4, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00
p.m.
Events Friday
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night
Friday, August 4, 8:30 p.m., Ri. 2003
Angell Hall. Dr. William E. Howard
III will speak on "Hydrogen Clouds in
Space." After the lecture the Student
Observatory on the fifth floor of Angell
Hall will be open for inspection and'
for telescopic observations of Saturn,
Jupiter, and a double star. Children
welcomed, but must be accompanied by
adults.
Student Recital: Walker Wyatt, bar-
Dramatic Arts Center
presents
DIXIELAND
JAZZ
with the
BOLL WEEVIL
JAZZ BAND
Friday, Aug. 4, rain or shine
9 P.M.-Midnight
GERMAN PARK
7 mi. N.E. of
Ann Arbor, Pontiac Trail
Donation $1.00
Adults Only
Come early: open 8:00 P.M.
HOT MUSIC
COLD BEER
NO MOSQUITOS

tone and student of Prof. Harold Haugh
will present a recital in partial fulfill-
ment of the requirements for the de-
gree Master of Music on Friday, Aug.
4, 8:30 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Compositions he will sing are by Rob-
ert Jones, John Dowiand, Heinrich
Schuetz, Mozart, Francis Poulenc, and
Charles Griffes. He will be assisted by
Elaine Warner, piano; Patricia Smith,
double-bass; and Roger Cody, Ronald
Socciarelli, Thomas Mattison, and John
Christie, trombone. Open to the public.
Events Saturday
Doctoral Recital: Larry Lusk, pianist,
will present a recital in partial fulfill-,
ment of the requirements for the de-
gree Doctor of Musical Arts on Sat.,
Aug. 5, 8:30 p.m. in Aud. A. He will
play the compositions of J. S. Bach,
Ravel, Bartok, Schumann, Copland,
and Chopin. Open to the general public.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Birmingham Eccentric; Birmingham-
Advertising space salesman with exper.
In layout. Immed. opening. Car pro-
vided by newspaper.
Smithsonian Institute, Wash., D.C.-
Fine Arts Asst. for Traveling Exhibi-
tion Service. Young woman with His-
tory of Art major plus grad, work and/
or museum exper., reading knowledge
of French or German, plus typing.
Not under civil service.
Chrysler Motors Corp., Administra-
tive Ass't for regional automotive sales
office at Skokie, Ill., On-the-job train-
ing for recent grad, male, Variety of
assignments leading to field sales or
mkmt. positions.
Walker. Mfg.Co., Jackson-Openings
for 2 Contact Engrgs. with automotive
background and 3-5 yrs. exper., and a
Cost Accountant, BBA, recent grad.
Ford Motor Co., Dearborn-Financial
Analyst for Planning Office Staff to
assist with analysis & establishment
of various rates & plans in connection
with automobile financing. Experience
required.
* * *
Please contact Bureau of Appoint-
ORGANIZATION\
NOTICE S
Baha's Student Group. Regular Week-
ly Meeting, Divine Love, Aug. 4, 8 p.m.,
418 Lawrence. Call NO 3-2904 for trans-
portation.

ments, Gen'l Div., 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544
for further details.
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1961-62
school year.
Dexter, Mich.-Elem; Elem. Voc. Mus;
Math, Geo.; H.S. Girls P.E.
Fenton, Mich. (Lake Fenton Schools)
Elem.; Elem. Math; Head Librarian;
Span., Soc. Stud.
Grand Rapids, Mich. (Kentwood Sch.
District)- Elem.; H.S. English, Soc.
Stud.
Holland, Mich. (West Ottawa Schools)
Elem.; Jr. H.S.,French; H.S. French.
Inkster, Mich. (Cherry Hill District)-
Jr. HS Math, Sci.; HS French, Math,
Bus.
Madison Heights, Mich. (Madison
District) - Elem.; Jr. ES Math. Sp.
Corr.
Rochester, Mich.- Elem.; Elem. Li-
brarian; Math; HSFrench.
St. Clair Shores, Mich. (Lakeview
Public Schools) Elem.; Elem. Voc. Mus.
Ypsilanti, Mich. (Roosevelt) - Crit-
ic Teacher for HS English (MA plus
exper. )
Yuma, Ariz.-Girls' PE; Math.
St. Louis, Mo. (Ladue School District)
-Jr. HS Librarian, Guidance Counselor,
Math; Elem. Girl's P.E.
Plainfield, N.J. - Elem.; Elem. Re-
med. Read.; Jr. HS Lang. Arts, Soc.
Stud.
Forest Grove, Ore. - Elem.; Elem.
Music, Girl's P.F.
Eau Claire, Wisc. - Elem. Mentally
Retard.; Jr. HS Art, English/Soc. Stud.,
Librarian.
For any additional information, con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3200
SAB, No 3-1511, Ext. 3547.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Building, during the following hours:
Monday thru Friday 8 a.m. til 12
noon and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Jack Lar-
die, Part-time Interviewer, at NO 3-1511
extension 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
4 Salesmen, commission basis, must
have car.
28-Psychological subjects, several one-
hour experiments.
2 Salesmen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
4 Salesmen, commission or salary
basis.
FEMALE
1-Reliable person, with car, to pick
up boy from school 11:30 a.m. til 1
p.m., Monday thru Friday. Start
Sept.
1-Good typist, ability to work with
figures full-time rest of summer
then 20 hours per week, permanent.
1-Stenographer, 20 hours per week
flexible for one month.
1-Stenographer. 2-3 afternoons per
week, permanent position.

Tonight and Saturday
at 7 and 9
RAY'S
IPATHER PANCHALI
(UNCUT VERSION)
Winner at three festivals, including the
Grand Prix, Cannes. Time: "A masterpiece
... the finest piece of filmed folklore since
Flaherty's 'Nanook of the North'."
Short: MUSCLE BEACH
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

DIAL NO 5-6290
HELD
i"A delightful picture
and a surefire hit!"
-Barry Wolman, Daily
FANNY was 18 and
French-a most
intriguing combination!

I

I

ICARON-CHEVALIER
CHARLES CHORST
BOYDR'BUCHHOLZ
TECH NICOLOR*

don '1 miss

I.

Air. and Mrs. Particular People
are ordering their Wedding Stationery
from
Ramsay Printers, Inc.
because of the scores of high quality
designs from which to choose

The famous design . . Gossard's pantie'
with unique up-shaped legs. The wonderful
treated elastic lace of cotton rubber and m

11

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