100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 03, 1961 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1961,

PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 19611

F

Yanks Sweep

Twin Bill from Athletics

EIEtDSY

-F

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York
Yankees won two games from Kan-
sas City yesterday, 6-5 and 12-5
with the help of four Athletics'
errors and Mickey Mantle's 40th
home run.
But Whitey Ford failed in his
bid for his 20th pitching victory
of the season.
As manager Ralph Houk, start-
ing his five-day suspension for a
rtn-in with umpire Ed Hurley
Sunday, watched the sweep on the
clubhouse TV, the Yanks capitaliz-
ed on Kansas City errors to win
the opener in the ninth inning.
Then in the second, Mantle got
the Yanks off in front with the
homer, that tied teammate Roger
Marts for the major league lead
and left them 17 games ahead of
the pace set by Babe Ruth when
the Bambino hit his record 60
,TONIGHT
Lydia Mendelsshn-8 P.M.
RASHOMON
by Fay & Michael Kamin
$1.50, 1.00
Box Office Open 10 -8
Performances thru Sat.
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

homers in 1927. The Babe hit his
40th in the. Yanks 120 game. The
New Yorkers have played 103 this
year.
Cards 4, Pirates 2
ST. LOUIS - Joe-Cunningham's
three-run homer in the seventh
inning gave the St. Louis Card-

inals a e4-2 victory over the Pitts-c
burgh Pirates.
Cunningham hit the first pitch1
served up to him by reliever'
Bobby Schantz after Bob Lillis
and Julian Javier had singled. '
Ken Boyer sent in the first
Redbird run with a single in thet
first ining which scored Javier1
and Bill White on second base
when White tapped to Pittsburgh1
starter Bob Friend and the two
ended up on the same base in the
ensuing rundown.-
Larry Jackson went all the way
for the Cardinals, giving up eight
hits, walking none and striking out
three. He now has a 7-8 record.
Loser Schantz is now 5-3.
* * *
Red Sox 8-7, Angels 7-2
BOSTON - The Boston Red
Sox swept a doubleheader from
Los Angeles today, 8-7 and 7-2,
with rookie Chuck Schilling
smashing a game winning homer.
in the nightcap and igniting the3
winning rally in the opener.
Los Angeles reliefer Art Fowler,
who had won five straight, was
the loser in both games.
Schilling, a boyish appearing,
second baseman, cracked Fowler's
first pitch to him in the ninth
inning, of the second game into
the screen atop the left field wall,
breaking a 7-7 tie.
In the first game Schilling's
run producng single touched off
a five-run Boston eighth inning
that broke open a 2-2 tie game.
That hit also was off Fowler.
Braves 4-7, Cubs 2-7
CHICAGO - The Chicago Cubs
and Milwaukee Braves played to
a 7-7 eleven-inning tie called on
account of darkness in the second
game of a doubleheader after the
Braves won the opener 4-2 on the
strength of a three-run explosion
in the eighth inning.
During the standoff Milwaukee
Reed Downs
Senikowski
By The Associated Press
Ray Senkowski, Michigan's Big
Ten singles tennis champ, was
beaten by Whitney Reed of Ala-
meda, Calif., yesterday in the
Meadow Club Invitational Tennis
Tournament at Southampton,
N.Y.
Reed, sixth-seeded in the tour-
ney, defeated the Wolverine -jun-
ior, 5-7, 6-1, 7-5.

overcame a 4-1 deficit and tookJ
a 7-4 lead in the seventh when
Hank Aaron smashed his first
1961 grand slam homer. It was
Aaron's 27th homer of the season,
and the fourth slam of his career.
The Cubs got a start toward a
tie when Billy Williams walloped
his second homer of the game and
third of the day off Johnny An-
tonelli, third of four Milwaukee
pitchers, in the eighth.f
Before Don McMahon could re-
store order in the Chicago ninth,
George Altman stroked a two-run
single to lift the Cubs into the
7-7 deadlock.
* , ,
White Sox 2-8, Indians 3-4
CLEVELAND - Jim (Mudcat)
Grant pitched the Cleveland In-
dians to a 3-2 victory in the open-
er of a doubleheader, but slugging
Jim Landis paced the Chicago
White Sox to an 8-4 win in the
nightcap. Landis homered in each
game.
With two out in the sixth in-
ning of the second game, Landis
belted his 14th home run of the
season with one on to put Chicago
out front 6-3.
Cal McLish (7-10) was the win-
ner and Jim Perry (8-9) the loser.
Grant (10-5) loaded the bases
in the opener with none out in the
sixth and again in the eighth with
j one out. Each time the White Sox

failed to capitalize on the situa-
tion.
In the third, Willie Kirklandj
clouted his 21st homer of the sea-
son with none on to put the Tribe
out front, 3-0.
Major League
StandingS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
x-Los Angeles 62 38 .620 -
x-Cincinnati 64 40 .615 -
x-San Francisco 54 46 .540 8
Milwaukee 52 48 .520 10
St. Louis 48 52 .480 14
Pittsburgh 45 49 .479 14
Chicago 43 58 .426 1911
x-Philadelphia 30 67 .309 30?1
x-Played night game.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.50
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.

FOR RENT
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. 017
GIRL WANTED to share apt. Call Rose-
mary after 5:30 p.m. NO 3-1342. C20:
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fail semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. C16
NOW A VAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. C9'
REAL ESTATE
INCOME PROPERTY for sale. $1500
down. Student apartments for rent.
Call 5-9114.
RBORE
SSOC I A TES,

TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS Norfolk Aug. 19, return Labor
Day. NO 3-9434. Ge
RIDE WANTED to Atlanta, Georgia, on
August 17. Will share driving and gas
costs. Phone 663-7024. 05

A VIA91W-0M

-.j

DIAL NO 5-6290
HELD
OVER
"A delightful picture
and a surefire hit!"
-Barry Wolman, Daily
FANNY was 18 and
Frenchr-a most
intriguing combination!

I

i

JOE CUNNINGHAM
. . clutch clouter
Tonight 7:30
at Hillel
Dancing - Taped panel
"JOB AND 'JB'"
1429 Hill Street
Dramatic Arts Center
presents
DIXIELAND
JAZZ
with the.
BOLL WEEVIL
JAZZ BAND
Friday, Aug. 4, rain or shine
9 P.M.-Midnight
GERMAN PARK
7 mi. N.E. of
Ann Arbor, Pontiac Trail
Donation $1.00
Adults Only
Come early: open 8:00 P.M.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 4-7, Chicago 2-7 (2nd
game called after 11 inn.-dark-
ness)
Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 2 (2nd
game inc.)
St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco at Los Angeles (inc.).
TODAY'S GAMES
Milwaukee (Burdette 12-7) at Chi-
cago (Cardwell 9-7)
Pittsburgh (Sturdivant 00) at St.
Louis ,Broglio 7-10) (n)
Philadelphia (Short 4-6) at Cincin-
nati (Hunt 9-8) (n),
San Francisco (McCormick 9-9) at
Los Angeles (Williams 10-8) (n)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 67 36 .650 -
x-Itroit 65 38 .631 2
Baltimore 59 47 .557 91
Cleveland 56 50 .528 121
Chicago 52 54 .491 16Y2
Boston 49 58 .458 20
Minnesota 46 57 .447 21
x-Washington 45 57 .441 211"
Los Angeles 45 59 .433 221/
Kansas City 37 65 .363 292
x-Played night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 7-8, Los Angeles 2-7
New York 6-12, Kansas City 5-5
Minnesota 4-3, Baltimore 3-4
Chicago 2-8, Cleveland 3-4
Washington 3- , Detroit 4-
TODAY'S- GAMES
Washington (Danieds.6-5) at Detroit
(Regan 9-6)
Los Angeles (McBride 9-6) at Bos-
ton (Schwanl 11-2) (n)
Kansas City (Shaw 6-9) at New
Y.ork (Daley 8-14) (n)
Minnesota (Kaat 4-11) at Baltimore
(Brown 8-3) (n)
Chicago (Baumann 8-8) at Cleve-
land (Hawkins 5-8) (n)
I-M Nines
Advance to
Se-mifinals
Education, the Afits, and the
Terrace Tigers joined the Math.
department as semifinalists in
the I-M summer softball tourna-
ment yesterday.
Education advanced by squeak-
ing by the Untouchables, 6-5, the
Afits edgedathe Chemical Engi-
neers, 7-6, and the Tigers com-
pleted the day's card among
championship teams by downing
Nuclear Engineering, 7-5. Mathe-
matics won their quarterfinal
contest last week.
In consolation contestshplayed.
yesterday, Tau Delta Chi out-
slugged Alpha Tau Omega, 11-6,
and Psychology eliminated the
Doctors from Nu Sigma Nu by a
6-4 count.
Semifinal contests are sched-
uled for next Tuesday, with the
finals coming two days later, on
Thursday.

Complete Auitomotive Service-Ail
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it.,
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
81
FOR SALE
1956 SPORTSMAN mobile home, 33 ft.
by 8 ft. $1600. Ideal for couple. Full
bath. Clean. NO 3-4016 or HIckory 9-
2306. B13
BY OWNER, will sacrifice: 2-bedroom
ranch, oak floors, storms and screens,
garage, fenced yard. Located at 1126
Hawthorne, Ypsilanti. Key at 1040
Olivia, Ann Arbor. Terms available.
No reasonable offer will be refused.
Reply Box 104, Michigan Daily. B12
BUSINESS SERVICES
For a better understanding of the
Middle Eastern situation try
SYRIAN BREAD
RALPH'S MARKET has it.
709 Packard
Open every night till midnight
J0
SUSTERKA
LAKE
Private swimming parties
Hall rental
Hayride and pizzaride
Horseback riding daily
Call DON BASTEDO,
HU 3-5010
J19
STUDENTS:'Neat. expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6

REALTORS
303 E. Div. 5-9114 Eves. 3-8424 or

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 Newand Used Instruments
BA.NJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
WANTED-Baby-sitting jobs. Reliable
woman with own transportation. Call
NO 3-0338.

DIAL
NO 8-6416
"Master

[rViI2Jlf1NOW

i

3-0434
RI

Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday .
$12.00 plus Sc a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
*TRUCKS AVAILABLE
01
HELP WANT ED
TWO WOMEN NEEDED for telephone
work in downtown office of local dry
cleaners. Interesting work. Guaran-
teed salary. Two shifts available. Tel.
NO 2-9546. H16
TYPIST two afternoons per week. In-
dependent real estate office. $1.75 per
hour. Sales people also needed. Com-
mission only. Prefer experienced per-
son. Call NO 3-9373. H14
STUDENTS: Here's an opportunity to
turn your sales ability into money.
Taking subscriptions for the Ann Ar-
bor Digest is profitable-very profit-
able Miss Dean will tell you all
about it. Phone NO 3-8838. HI15
USED CARS
AUSTIN-HEALY convertible Deluxe 1000
Series. Call Rosemary after 5:30 p.m.
NO 3-1342. N5
1958 FORD convertible, automatic trans-
mission, radio, heater. Excellent con-
dition. $1200. Call Chuck, days 8-7874,
evenings 5-6384. N6
BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.44; wash-n-wear slacks
2.77; many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W2
A CONSIGNMENT SHOP for furniture,
dishes, baby items, rugs, what-have-
you. The Treasure Mart, 529 Detroit
St., NO 2-1363. Open Monday and Fri-
day nights till 9:00. W1

S tOUCh -all of
Bergman's extraordinary
talents are on display.
Dreams'is a beautifully
constructed composition."
-Newsweek
"Bergman has seldom
said anything in a more
vigorous and suitable
style. Shrewdly ironic ...
lewdly hilarious." -Time

-

WILLIE KIRKLAND
.. . hot streak

EASTERN OPEN:
Pine Ridge Harder
For Pro Linksmen

Read
Daily
Classifieds

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
4:A?
#:#:: ;-;.fit ' , Y ' . :, . -

Lf- l PAE ^URiCE
ARON *CHEVALER
CN^"&xs " Onen
BOYERUCHI OLZ
TECHNICOLĀ©W

HOT MUSIC
COLD BEER
NO MOSQUITOS

N

=Omni

DIAL NO 2-6264 PLEASE NOTE
4 SHOWS DAILY
AT 1:00 - 3:30
6:15 AND 9:05

BALTIMORE (R)-Golf pros en-
tered in the $35,000 Eastern Open
found out yesterday that the Pine
Ridge course is growing up and
should be a tougher test of their
mettle.
Fifty of them toured the 6,820-
yard long layout in a preliminary
ZINDELL
OLDSMOBILE
Ann Arbor, NO 3-0507

round before starting today on a
72-hole grind, and the general run
of scores was nowhere near the
low range of the past.
The course, meandering around
a city water reservoir, was open-
ed only two years ago and the
pros treated the par of 72 merci-
lessly both years.
Dave Ragan of Orlando, Fla.,
and Gene Littler of Singing Hills,
Calif., both won with scores of
273, a total of 15 under par
Littler, who led for seven of
his eight rounds in the two years,
started off both times with 65.
Ragan, whose highest score
when he won the Eastern two
years ago was 70, required 76
strokes in his tour of Pine Ridge
yesterday.
Littler skipped the Pro-Am, but
will be among the 129 pros com-
peting in the open proper, The
field also willinclude 13 amateurs
for the first 36 holes. The num-
ber of starters will be reduced to
the low 80 scores for Saturday's
third round and 60 in the last 18
Sunday.
The prize at stake for the low
scoring pro is $5,300.

BIL LIARDS
and
SWIMMING
daily except Sunday
at the
MICHIGAN UNION

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
presents
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
PATHER PANCHALI

r

SPECIAL SHOE SALE

11

S.G.C.
Gin em quad
Tonight, Friday and Saturday
at 7 and 9
RAY'S
PATHER PANCHALI
Winner at three festivals, including the
Grand Prix, Cannes, Time: "A masterpiece
+ he finet nire of filmel folklore since

Admittedly influenced by Fla-
herty's "Nanook of the North,"
Jean Renoir's "The Southern-
er," DeSica's "Bicycle Thief,"
and all of Chaplin, Satyajit Ray
has said his own goal is to make
modes that "depict physical en-
vironment. with the utmost
truth and explore human rela-
tionships to their utmost limits,
eschewing all short-cut meth-
ods which have been artificially
imposed by non-artistic consid-
erations." There is no question
that in Pather Panchali Ray
has been supremely successful.
Rare is the film that conveys
the sense of place-the feel,
the smell, the familiarity-that
is achieved in Pather Panchali,
And rarer is the film which cre-
ates round, human characters
in all their individual richness
and is able to root them in these
vivid surroundings.
One of the ways Ray achieves
all this is through his use of the
lingering camera. His camera
does not dart constantly from
fact to face, from detail to de-
tail but remains focused on an
old woman's face, a child's
hand, or a chicken in the court-
yard. The camera lingers there
and we see and see. Those who
have seen Pather Panchali re-
member vividly the dusty court-
yard, the hole in the surround-
ing wall, the porch on which
the aged woman sits cross-
legged, using her weak fingers
to scoopher meal of mush into
that withered and toothless
face.

it moves when the expression
changes-all so that when new
changes come we shall know
how to interpret them. Ray's
lingering camera does this and
forces us to do it.
Many people, accustomed to
the rapid cuts and often fran-
tic movement of most American
and European films, are dis-
turbed by Ray's natural hand-
ling of movement which permits
one to contemplate the image
while letting the image pene-
trate deeply. Yet to fully enjoy
Pather Panchali one must try
to feel comfortable with its
movement, remembering always
that stillness is not stasis. This
method, in fact, better than any
other catches silence-the tight
silence of embarrassment or the
relaxed silence that exists be-
tween children at play, friends
in thought, or a family in har-
mony, when there is no compul-
sion to fill the air witih sounds.
This is not to say that Pather
Panchali is without action.
Those who have seen it will re-
member young Apu racing after
his sister-past the water lilies
and through the weeds that
dwarf him - suddenly coming
upon the humming telegraph
line and the locomotive which
plunges past - a scene which
grows from simple to dynamic
lyricism in a burst of wide-eyed
childish revelation.
Neither do we mean to imply
that all directors should extend
the duration of their shots. In-
AnaA i n . factmnn. oan, nor-

Nunn-Bush & Edgerton Shoes

one group to
- -... sr

19.95 Now 9.95
17 QC Wn 14.S9

1

m

I"~IrIlJP4i WLfULLI~l 1 -I 1 ~ .1

1I

I'

I

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan