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August 03, 1961 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-08-03

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1961

VUW' MWUTVZ A 1\ T 71 A TWu

THURSDAY, AUGUST ,1961 AUREJ ' IAILY,
t ,

PAGE THREE

EC

1 ,

"t
these
YA
YEAR

Marckwardt Traces
Evolution of Words

Just wonderful BUYS-in
Just wonderful DRESSES-
for H-O-T Days or COOL Days-
now
Orig. prices 14.95 to 49.95
and in a wonderful size range for
small 5-15, taller 8-20
tal-tall- 10-18 -

By BILL JEFFRIES
The question of the origin of
the words "much" and "many"
was discussed by Prof. Albert,
Marckwardt of the English depart-
ment Tuesday night in his talk,
"Much and Many: The History of
Modern Englsh Distributional Ps t-
terns."
The word "much" had its origin
in the Old English word "mycel"
and meant great, pertaining to
size, while the word "many" had
its origin in the Old English
"monig" and meant many in the
sense of many a book or many a
man.
To indicate quantity the word
"fela" was used. Over a period of
centuries the word fela disappear-
ed and much and many become
modified to their present day use.
Adapt New Words
In addition new words are
adapted from other languagesto
replace much and many in their
Old English use.
According to Marckwardt, the
use of the word fela, in referring
to quantity, was last used in 1598.
It was, however, used with the
sense of "much" until the late,
16th century.
The word "many" seems to have
the forms of monig, manigne,
moni, and monega before arriving
at the present spelling which
shows up during the 15th century.,
'Much' Evolves
Much goes through several
phases as mitch, micel, mycel an;
in dialect even to muckel and
mickel, Marckwardt indicated.
Marckwardt said that one diffi-
culty in teaching English to non-
AIR CONDITIONED

larger 38-44, shorter.

101/2 to 261/2

ALBERT MARCKWARDT
... word origins
English speaking people was how
to use word pairs as: much and
many, say and tell, and, speak
and talk.
Board Grants
Co-operative
Authorization
The New York State Board of
Regents has granted a corporate
charter to a five-college co-opera-
tive which plans to pool resources.
The co-operative which will be
called the College Center of the
Finger Lakes includes five schools
in New York and Pennsylvania. It
will eliminate duplication of costly
low-attendance courses by unify-
ing them in one college.
They will also combine library
facilities so that all students will
have access to rare and expensive
books.
The group plans to cut adminis-
trative costs by purchasing sup-
plies jointly, taking out joint in-
surance and using the services of
a co-operative printing center.

Asians Face
Education
Challenges
Prof. Richard Anderson of the
University of Hawaii cited the
antivocational bias, student un-
rest and "examination hell" as
some major factors involved in
education today.
Prof. Anderson joined Prof. Wil-
liam Medlin of the education
school and visiting professors Rob-
ert Leestma and Francis Drag in
a panel discussion on "Education
in Asia" Monday night.
The Philippines stood out as an
exception to Prof. Anderson's
major comments with the pos-
sible exclusion of an antivocational
bias.
All of the panalists placed con-
siderable emphasis on the fact
that Asians, as part of their Con-
fuscian heritage,rhave an anti-
vocational bias, or "white collar"
attitude about manual labor which
makes education particularly im-
portant to them.
They believed that the best cure
for educational problems. in Asia
was decentralized finance and
government control.
The panelists thought the major
contribution the United States
could make was showing Asians
the ways of implementing Demo-
cracy.
"Examination hell" Prof. An-
derson explained, is a very impor-
tant period of testing to deter-
mine whether a student is per-
mitted to contiue his education.
The examination period, he said,
has such strong effects that the
examinations dominate education
until they become an end in them-
selves.
In many Asian countries, edu-
cation occupies a large portion of
the national budget, the panelists
pointed out. Leestma said that in
Thailand education spending is
second only -to overall economic
development, with defense spend-
ing occupying a third place posi-
tion.
. The Philippines spend more on'
education than any other single;
item.

.vDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.K4.'54.i'ii:":viii{"} n';t:4}:4;45.i'4SL}}ai .S r}}.°v}:: :1:iiV p 1tL:." 7 A*r. 4% . .:i.. . 1 4 p tA L. . :h1.i.yW .

BARGAIN BOOK BUYS:
Charges Spiral Downward

You'll be
saying,
"I'm glad
I shopped
before I left,
at.--

ON FOREST
off corner of
S. University
opposite
Caonpus Theatre

(Continued from Page 2)
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Thurs.,
Aug. 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the Rackham
Amphitheatre. James W. Downer, As-
sistant Prof. of English will discuss
"Language Models in Linguistic Geog-
raphy."
Doctoral Examination for John Law-
rence Hughes, Pharmaceutical Chem-
istry; thesis: "The Preparation and Use
of Mannich Products Obtained from
Alkylpyridines." Thurs., Aug. 3, 2525.
Chemistry Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman,
F. F. Blicke.
Events Friday
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night
Friday, August 4, 8:30 p.m., Rm. 2003
Angell Hall. Dr. William E. Howard
III will speak on "Hydrogen Clouds in
Space." After the lecture the Student
Observatory on the fifth floor of Angell
Hall will be open for inspection and
for telescopic observations of Saturn,
Jupiter, and a double star. Children
welcomed, but must be accompanied by
adults.
Student Recital: Walker Wyatt, bari-
tone and student of Prof. Harold Haugh
will present a recital in partial fulfill-
ment of thearequirements for the de-
gree Master of Music on Friday, Aug.
4, .8:30 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Compositions he will sing are by Rob-
ert Jones, John Dowland, Heinrich
Schuetz, Mozart, Francis Poulenc; and
Charles Griffes. He will be assisted by
Elaine Warner, piano; Patricia Smith,
double-bass; and Roger Cody, Ronald
Socciarelli, Thomas Mattison, and John
Christie, trombone. Open to the public.
Placement
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Darling & Co., Chicago, I11.-Opening
in Chemical Division for recent gradu-
ate Chemical Engineer with BS or MS.
Chemical Div. manufactures specialty.
fats and oils, fatty acids, glycerine and
hydrogenated fatty derivatives. Exper.
secondary to good academic prepara-
tion.
Marion County Mental Health Clinic,
Marion, Ohio-Chief Clinical Psychol-
ogist. Require PhD or equivalent, with
2 yrs. of subsequent experience pre-

Now in its second day, the Uni-
versity library book sale at the
Undergraduate Library finds its
original inventory considerably
depleted.
Books on sale are either volumes
no longer needed for library col-I
lections, duplicates or different
editions from the ones the librar-
ies are using.
Although some of the sale books
have specific prices, Stephen Ford,
head of the order department, ex-
plained that in a sense, the cus-,
tomer has a unique opportunity
to "set his own price."
Those not sold yesterday will go
for 25 cents today and volumes
still remaining tomorrow will cost
10 cents.

LIBRARY SALE-Profits from the sale will go to the library's
general book funds when sale expenses have been met.

1:00 P.M.- 11:00 P.M.
daily except ZSn.

Classified Advertising Number
IsNowNO_2-4786

at the
MICHIGAN UNION

ferred. For out-patient Mental Health4
Clinic. Opportunity for private prac-
tice outside 40 hr. clinic week.
Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ill.-
Looking for grad with BA in Journal-
ism or closely related field for new
opening of Press Relations Associate.
Experience in Journ. and/or Public
Relations desirable, but not a pre-
requisite. To assist in dev. and imple-
mentation of press recs. programs and
activities of Public Rels. Dept.
Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho
Branch, Idaho Falls, Idaho-Personnel
Representative. Grad. with BS/BA with
3-5 yrs. experience. in personnel work
with emphasis on recruiting & employ-
ment, job analysis, & wage surveys.
Minimum age-26 yrs.
Please contact General Division, Bu-
reau of Appts., 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544 for
further information.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have listed va-
cancies for the 1961-62 school year.
Cement City, Mich.-Girls PE; Ind.
Arts/Counselor.
Dearborn (Dist. No. 4), Mich.-Girls
PE.
Detroit (Redford Union Schools),
Mich.-French/English; Jr. High SS/
English; Jr. High Science/Math.
Durand, Mich,-Elem. Vocal Music;
Sec. Vocal Music; 1st Grade; World
History/Asst. Coach.
Flint, Mich.-Elem.; Elem. Los Achiev-
Art; Art/Vocal Music; Jr. High Math;
Science; English; Chemistry, Ment.
Ret.
Grosse le, Mich.-Elem. Mulic; Jr.
High Girls PE; 3rd Grade.
Holton, Mich.-1st Grade; Music.
LaPeer, Mich.-Girls' PE; Latin/Eng-
lish; Elem.
Rose City, Mich.-Band..
St. Clair Shores (Lake Shore PS),
Mich.-Girls' PE; English; Math.
3 Oaks, Mich.-Vocal Music.
Trenton, Mch.-Elem.; ,Ment. Hdcp.;
V.T.: Chem; PE; Home-making.
Vandalia, Mich. - Math/Science;
Elem.
Englewood (Cherry Creek Schools),
Colorado - Elem.; Elem. Librarians;
Dev. Reading; French; Spanish; Girls
PE (modern dance); Phys. Sci/Biol.;
Latin
Aurora, II.-Elem.; Jr. High Math.
Palatine, III.-Chem.
Park Forest, Il.-Math/Senior Sci-
ence; Ep. Ed. (EMH).
Gary, Ind. - Elem.; English/I.D.R.
Gen. Math/Scd.; Gen. Sdi./Guidance;
Home Ed.; Latin/Spanish/English; PE
(Girls'); Spec. Ed.
Rochester, N.Y. - English; Science;
German; Bus. Ed.; Girls' PE; Art; Elem.
Spec. Ed.; School Social Worker.
Norwalk, Ohio-Science.
Wapakoneta, Ohio-Girls' PE.
Seattle (The Lakeside School), Wash-
ington-Math.
Oshkosh, Wis.-Jr. High Vocal Mu-
sic, Man.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200
SAB, NO 3-1511, Ext. 3547.

TEACHER PLACEMENTS:
Part time position for Physical Edua.
major (man) as athletic trainer at Ann
Arbor area high school. Must be able
to start around August 25th and work
during the school year. For additional
information, contact Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB, Ext. 3547.
Part-Time
Employment
Ei
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Building, during the following hours:
Monday thru Friday 8 a.m. til 12
noon and 1:30; til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Jack Lar-
die, Part-time Interviewer, at NO 3-1511
extension 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
yobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALL
1-Reliable person, with car, to pick
up boy from school 11:30-1 p.m.,
Monday thru Friday. Start Septem-
ber.
2-Salesmen, commission basis, must
have car.
5-Salesmen, commission or salary
basis.
17-Psychological subjects, several one
hour experiments.
3-SaLesmen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
FEMALE
1-Good typist, ability to work with
figures full-time rest of summer,
then 20 hours per week, permanent.
1-Stenographer, 20 hours per week
flexible for one month.
1-Stenographer, 2-3 afternoons per
week, permanent position.
1-Reliable person, with car, to pick
up boy from school 11:30 a.m. til 1
p.m., Monday thru Friday. Start
Sept.
Organization
Notices
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Danc-
ing & Taped Recording "Job and
'J.B.'," Prof. Felheim-Rev. Baker, To-
night, August 3, 7:30 p.m., Hillel.
* * *
Bahai Student Group, Regular Week-
ly Meeting, Divine Love, August 4, S
p.m, 418 Lawrence. Call NO 3-2004 for
transportation.
* * .
Sailing Club will meet at 7:45 this
evening, 311 W. Engineering. A movie
and shore school will follow the reg-
ular business meeting.

KENDALL KLEIS
University of Illinois

ROSEMARY SEAVER
Mademoiselle Magazine
College Board

I-

61

MARY LOUISE PALMER
University of Wisconsin

SALLY SCULLY
Marygrove College

I

I

MARTHA PURDY
University of Michigan

KAREN GEX
Eastern Michigan University

MARIANNE SINCLAIR
Michigan State University

ORICH LANDRUM
Radcliffe College

meet the girls with the answers on what
to wear there, and getting there,. ..
Jacobson's College Board-1961
Our College Board headquarters is now open and staffed by nine
bright girls from America's leading colleges, ready to clue you in on
the do's and don'ts, the pros and protocol of campus life. This is your
opportunity to learn more about the school of your choice - so come in

SANDLER
OF BOSTON
Wts all
done
with
lines...
CLASSIQIJE
New lines that round gently at the
throat, dip lightly on the side, point
sharply at the toe. A pump with
priceless fashion . . .devastatingly

i
I
k,

IJr
'f itk

MARY KAY BEISSEL
St. Mary's Notre Dame

in soon, and visit with our college board.
To acquaint you with the newest in campus
fashions, there will be informal modeling of
all the exciting, colorful apparel that is arriving
daily . . . all so perfect for a busy college
schedule.,You'll enjoy seeing this high-spirited
collection of everything from, beautiful basics
to off beat fantasies.

',.. _..
' :
.tiff
:<

Ii_

I

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