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July 14, 1964 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-07-14

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7 Y 14, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y 14, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)UCATION IN 1984

Schools Must Stress Concepts'

(Continued from Page 1)
acquire knowledge, E r i c k s e n
said.
Today, however, "knowledge is
getting away from, us. The out-
pouring of knowledge is so fast,
we can't keep up with it."
A result of this explosion, Erick-
sen observed, is "informational ob-
solescence": even before a student
graduates, new discoveries are be-,
ginning to outdate the facts he
has just learned..
Concepts, on the other hand, are
a bit more durable. Once mas-
tered, they enable the student to
"abstract out of real-life situa-
tions, relationships that are the
same as those he learned in the
classroom," Ericksen explained.
Coping with the knowledge ex-
plosion will involve more than
merely teaching concepts in gen-
eral, he continued. Educators of
1984 should be especially con-
cerned with imparting methods of
inquiry, rational values and mo-
tivation:
-Methods of inquiry-"gener-
alized procedures scientists and
scholars use to wrestle with their
problems"-will enable the stu-
dent to get what facts he needs
on his own, even after his formal
education is completed.
-Values will become increas-
ingly important, because men will,
have to decide what to do with
their more and more potent tech-
nological powers. These questions
are "broad, complicated and be-
yond the scope of science," Erick-

sen maintained. "The humanities
will have to carry the major bur-
den of discussing them, from kin-
dergarten to the Ph.D. level."
For example, he cited the need
for more precise analyses of value
words. "Freedom", he pointed out,
is a rallying cry for both the civil-
rights movement and the Gqjd-
water bandwagon-yet it means
radically different things to each
group. Stress on semantics rather
than on spelling and grammar in
courses such as freshman English
would help get American politics
off this "abstract verbal merry-go-
round," Ericksen declared.
-Motivation for learning must
be made more genuine. "The way
a teacher does it now is by ap-
pealing to extrinsic motives." He
threatens the student with poor
grades, flunking out, rejection of
his college entrance application or
lowered earning power-"reasons
other than the act of acquiring
knowledge," Ericksen said.
He called for teachers to learn
to utilize "intrinsic motives," to
show students that "the acquisi-
tion of knowledge can be its own
reward. The whole situation in
education will change dramatical-
ly when that is achieved," he pre-
dicted.
All of these are what should be
taught in 1984. In order to teach
them, however, educators will
have to discard old methods and
embrace the new educational
technology which is emerging to-
day, Ericksen said.
And equally important, they

must use it imaginatively. Erick-
sen warned that technical innova-
tions may be used to promote
false, assembly-line ' 'efficiency"
rather than to improve the im-
pact of education on the individ-
ual student.
He cited one college which has
built a "white elephant" televi-
sion-lecture hall. In its center, a
professor delivers his lecture to a
television camera. Around him,
arranged like slices in a pie, are
five 300-seat lecture halls, each
with a mammoth TV screen.
"The path of least resistance
seems to be to teach the same
thing to more and more students,"
Ericksen said.
But automation can be used to
promote dissent and individuality.
To accomplish this, he suggested,
educators could establish a uni-
versity along these lines:
"As part of its library system
there would be a series of auto-
mated carrells." Each carrell
would be linked to a computer and
equipped with various visual and
aural teaching devices. Here a
student could receive individual-
ized instruction in the factual
matter of the course.
In effect, the machines could
bring him from ignorance of a
subject to mastery of its estab-
lished body of knowledge. From
this plateau, the teacher would
take over.
Then "the professor will sit with
the students as a teacher talking
like a researcher." With such well-
prepared students, a dialogue
could take place concerning the
advanced aspects of the subject,
the areas where there are no'
clear-cut answers.
They could discuss, for example,
the latest research. "No longer'
would there be this disjunction'
between teaching and research,''
Ericksen said.
When will all this come about?
As a man professionally con-
cerned with bringing about edu-
__ To the beach or to
newest idea in low-
cost,-high-fun trans-
portation.
Worth its weight
in pleasure and eas-
ier to ride than a
bicycle.
Honda of Ann Arbor

cational innovation, Ericksen is
pessimistic about the outlook for
radical change. "Education lags
far behind medicine and law in
trying to bring about individual-
ized treatment. We feel more com-
fortable teaching the things we
learned as students.
Professors aren't going to like
it, because the easiest thing to do
is to stand before an audience and
drop pearls of wisdom.
"We feel more comfortable
teaching the things we learned as
students," he remarked.
Ericksens talk also touched on
several other issues of local sig-
nificance. Among them:
-College Boards, tests which
test the academic abilities of ap-
plicants for college admission,
aren't enough, he said. "Whatever
it is that these tests measures ac-
counts for only about 25 per cent
of what makes for success." He
said that additional criteria-such
as values, criteria and motiva-
tion-must be used in evaluating
applicants.
-The measure of a school's
success shouldn't be just its top
students but all of them-includ-
ing the proportion of them who
drop out, he asserted. In line with
improving the lot of the average
student, he said, the Center for
Research in Learning and Teach-
ing is taking an interest in the
University's "equal opportunities
program.
This recently-initiated program
is bringing students to the Uni-
versity from poor areas of De-
troit. "All of them have the abil-
ity to graduate. If they drop out,
it'll be largely for non-academic
reasons," Ericksen said.
-He commended the University
for "lagging behind" other colleges
in the trend toward false efficien-
cy in education. He said it has
done more than any Big Ten
school to maintain an emphasis
on educating students to be indi-
viduals.

OPbserves
Program
(Continued from Page 1)
submit their nominations. These
are based on high school academic
performance, test scores, extra-
curricular achievements and per-
sonality traits. The most important
characteristics will be motivation-
al attitudes which Sain said has
been an important variable in
University studies.
Objective criterion - such as
national tests-will also be taken
into account.
The students will then apply to
the college of their choice. If they
win, all that remains is for the
school to accept them.
Difficult
Sain said that it is difficult
to estimate how many of these
students will wind up at the Uni-
versity. He predicted that the nu-
merical limitations by section
would keep the state of Michi-
gan's total less than the Univer-
sity's Negro entrants culled from
its own program.
About 65 students will enter this
fall through opportunity award
grants.
In unveiling the Ford Founda-
tion program, President Henry
Heald observed the strikingly lcw
totals of Negroes entered in up-
per-level education.
"The foundation will continue
to help raise the standards of
education for Negroes with a goal
that might be defined as the day
when Negroes can win academic
parity with other young people
and actually no longer need spe-
cial scholarship programs," he
said.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

CLRI*EI*&

USED CARS
SIMCA - i959 Aronde Super Delux-
34,000 miles. Call eves. 665-5266, N16
'62 BUICK Special, white conv., buck.
seats. Best offer. NO 5-6811. N15
VW-One owner, garaged, 23,000 real
miles. Ex. cond. $950. NO 2-0683. N12
1963 TR-3 with TR-4 engine Excellent
condition. $1695. NO 3-8670. N13
1960 MG-A white convertible. NO 5-
3373. Best offer accepted, N10
'61 OR '56 RAMBLER Classic, 4 door
sedans. Both excel. cond. Best offer.
Call Debora at Univ. X 86-461 or
HA 6-8171. N9
MERCURY station wagon, 1957, in ex-
cellent condition. Reasonable. Trade
considered. NO 3-9478. N8
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
1958 LAMBRETTA-Clean, reasonable.
NO 2-0779. Z7
ITALIAN 10 speed racing bike. Red, ex-
cellent cond., 1 yr. old. $55. Call HU
2-7446. Z7
YOU meet the nicest people on a
HONDA! Join the fun at HONDA of
Ann Arbor. 1906 Packard Rd. 665-
9281. 2
NICHOLSON MOTORCYCLE SALES
Triumph, Yamaha, BMW
Scooter Repairs
224 S. First St. 662-7409
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
ANNOUNCING
Whit's Truck Rental
202 W. Washington St.
Ann Arbor
Call
NO 5-6875
Pick-ups Panels
Small Vans
HELP WANTED
BAB-YSITTER FOR FALL-Must be ex-
perienced, mature. Light housekeep-
ing. 665-3257. H8
EARN MONEY as a subject in psycho-
logical experiments. Pay usually runs
$1.25/hr. Apply Rm. 109 W. Physics
Bldg. H7
20-25 YR. OLD GIRL to live with handi-
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2
3
4

I DAY
.70
.85

Figure 5 average words to a
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 2:30
Phone NO} 2-4786

MISCELLANEOUS

VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF
RALPH'S MARKET
picnic supplies
party foods
kitchen supplies
kosher foods
709 Packard-open till midnight

You don't like bugs, but we dot
We sell bug spray-
THE VILLAGE APOTHECARY
1112 So. University

L

WANTED-Street cleaners to.sweep up
old parking tickets from University
parking lots. Meter Maids need not
apply.
Meet the Right People
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of personality
appraisal and an IBM system, is to
introduce unmarried persons to others
whose background and ideals are
congenial with their own. Interviewvs
by appointment. Phone after 9 am.,
NO 2-4867.
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

Hot Tasty French Fries 12c
Triple Thick Shakes . 20c
Delicious Hamburgers 15c
2000 W' Stadium Blvd.
Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

NOW'Ti1LJULY 25
JIM CARDER
DOORS OPEN 8:00
FIRST SHOW 9:00
Cover Charge:
Monday-Thursday 1.00
Friday-Saturday 1.25c
O~e jqotcent ani p
COFFEE HOUSE
114 E. Washington (at Bimbos)
668-9135

SALES POSITION
AVAILABLE
High starting salary plus commis-
sions, in an industry with a future.
Training programn and fringe bene-
fits.
Write C. B. Gould, P. 0. Box 127,
Flint, Michigan.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-One Rek-o-kut K33H turn-
table, in good condition, reasonably
priced. Call NO 3-6211 after 6. B4
DESKS, DRESSERS, tables, chairs, bar-
gain priced. After 6, call 665-0176 or
665-3214. B2
TWO GREEN army officer uniforms,
size 40L-used, in fine condition.
Call NO 3-9106. B3
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED TO CHICAGO-Week-
end of July 24. Will share driving and
expenses. Call 3-1561, X 545 after 5. G
NOTICE I
For Airport Limousine Service call 663-
8300. To Metropolitan $4.00. To Willow
Run $2.50. Metro round trip $7.00. 01

GUITARS, ETC.
Make Repairs, Buy and Sell
Private and Group Instruction
Hoots Daily
Herb David Guitar Studio
NO 5-8001
209 S. STATE
X
A-1New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS, AD BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING IT YOURSELF?
Grad. students inquire about penny
master and our offset process. Pro-
fessional Service Associates, 665-8184.
J
665-8184
MANUSCRIPT typing, transcription,
medical, legal, technical conferences,
mimeographing, offset.
Quick, Accurate, Experienced
ANN ARBOR PROFESSIONAL
SERVICE ASSOCIATES
334 Catherine

1906 Packard
665-9281

.......

J

Interested in Working
on Michigan Daily staffs?

I.......................................................................................................................ii

I

The

c

CO ANTEMPORAiRY C ARDS

it

cat

$25 REWARD for recovery of lost man-
uscript. Topic: Bowen, Welty, and
Croce, Collingwood. Approximately
200 pages on legal bond. Call Daily,
2-3241. A2
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDING FOR MEN-Friends Center
Intn'l. Co-op, 1416 Hill St. Summer
$70. 4 hrs. work required. Call 3-3856
or 2-9890 El

/A 1

DROP
IN
ANY
TIME

(but the prices are
312 S. State St.

CHESTER
ROBERTS

are

I

out of this world

r

I

down to earth)
1203 5.University

11

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'.
M1
?
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: :
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{:}

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Open your Ann Arbor Bank Specialcheck
checking account today. You don't have
to pay for your checks in advance . .
you pay just 10c for each check you write
and Ann Arbor Bank has three campus

~I

offices to serve you.

Please won't you

stop in and see us?

II

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