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June 23, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-06-23

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)AY, JUNE 23, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

AY, .JUNE 23, 1964 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Democrats Support
'Freedom' Party,

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(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first of two articles on the Demo-
cratic State Convention, which was
held June 12-13)
By ROBERT SELWA
Special To The Daily
LANSING-In the battle that
is shaping up over the seating of
delegates at the Democratic Na-
tional convention, Michigan's del-
egates will have explicit pro-civil
rights instructions.
After giving its support, both
written and oral, to President
Lyndon B. Johnson, Senator Phil-
ip Hart (D-Mich) and guberna-
torial candidate Neil Staebler, the
convention gave instructions to the
delegates to support the seating
of the delegates nominated by the
Mississippi Freedom Democratic
Party. This is a civil rights politi-
cal party challenging the regular
Mississippi Democratic Party.
These instructions came at the
state convention, June 12 and 13,
of the Michigan Democratic par-
ty.
They were contained in a res-
olution which specified:
"This Convention instructs the

senior party. A month earlier, the
Washtenaw County Democratic
convention took the same position.
The state convention chose 92
delegates and 100 alternatives to
the national convention and drew
up a policy that was strongly fav-
orable toward civil rights and civil
liberties.
Prompt Enforcement
One resolution adopted by the
convention called for "prompt and
vigorous enforcement of civil
rights laws and of Section II of
the Fourteenth Amendment. This
section provides for reduction of
the representation of any state in
Congress in proportion to the
share of its citizens denied the
right to vote.
The debate on the convention
floor was over an amendment to
this resolution. The amendment
pledged efforts "to fight racial
discrimination in the Democratic
party throughout the United
States" and was approved.
The resolution on the Freedom'
Democratic party had a similar
provision. It applied the policy
about delegate seating "to other
states in which challenges by sim-
ilar representative and loyal groups
of Democrats may develop." This
may be the case with Alabama,
which along with Mississippi has
an "unpledged electors" move-
ment.
Lists Two Reasons
Two reasons were listed in the
resolution for Michigan's opposi-
tion to the regular Democratic
party of Mississippi.
First, the regular party discrim-
inates against Negroes, who make
up nearly half of the population
of Mississippi, and is hence "un-
democratically constituted."
Second, the regular party fails
to support the platform and poli-
cies of the national Democratic
party, it said.
Distribute Platform
Supporters of the "free Missis-
sippi" movement distributed a
copy of the 1960 platform of the
regular Democratic party of Mis-
sissippi. After statements in sup-
port of racial segregation of states'
rights and of "preservatiQn of our
traditional Southern American
way of life," the platform declar-
ed:
"We reject and oppose the plat-
forms of both national parties
and their candidates."
The Mississippi Freedom Demo-
cratic party was organized this
year by the Council of Federated
Organizations, a group working
for civil rights in Mississippi. The
Freedom Democratic party has
planned to have procedures for
electing national convention dele-
gates that would be exactly paral-
lel to the procedures of the regular
party but without state sanction.

SENATOR HART
c-

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CONGRESSMAN STAEBLER
Michigan delegation at the forth-
coming national convention to take
all appropriate action to seat the
delegates from the Freedom Dem-
ocratic party of Mississippi.'
Dynamite
These instructions, which could
constitute dynamite at the nation-
al convention, were adopted with
no floor controversy at the state
convention. The decision to sup-
port the Freedom Democratic par-
by seemed to come from pressure
from civil rights groups and from
a growing sentiment within the
Michigan party.
Two months earlier, the Michi-
gan Young Democrats at its state
convention decided to support the
Freedom Democratic party and to
work for similar support of the

Be Refreshed
this Summer!.
Read The Daily
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