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June 26, 1964 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1964-06-26

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FRIDAY, JUNTE 26, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, JUNE 26, 1964THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SPEC ULATION

Free Elector Slates in Trouble

Tshombe: Congo Head?

Sawyer Pursues End
Of Cost Restriction

4

LEOPOLDVILLE ()-Congolese
speculated yesterday that Moise
Tshombe, returning from exile,
may become premier of the Congo
government which, with the help
of a United Nations army, crush-
ed his secessionist regime in Ka-
tanga 18 months ago.
Four factors figured in talk that
the 47-year-old former provincial
president, who headed home from
Madrid Wednesday, possibly will
be called on to succeed his old
antagonist, Premier Cyrille Adoula:
-Several members of Adoula's
cabinet were among Congolese
leaders advocating Tshombe's re-
turn.
Powerless
-The Leopoldville regime has
been apparently powerless to put
down rebellions that have flared
like brush fires over the last six
months in North Katanga, Kivu
and Kwilu provinces.
-The last of the United Na-
tions' peacekeeping force, which
numbered 20,000 men at its peak,
is departing Tuesday.
-President Joseph Kasavubu
expects to get vastly increased
executive powers through a new
constitution in a nationwide, 15-
day referendum that will open
tomorrow. The proposed new pow-
ers include the right to appoint
or dismiss a premier at will.
The news of Tshombe's return
electrified Elisabethville, the capi-
tal from which he ran Katanga as
an independent territory for more
than two years after Belgium
freed the Congo in 1960.
Expect Passage
In the constitutional referen-
dum, a massive "yes" vote is ex-
pected. Only men, 21 or older, will
pass on the draft law of 206
articles.
Negro Schools
Get 13 Million
The Ford Foundation announc-
ed yesterday a $13 million loan to
13 Negro colleges to help them
reach the highest quality possible.
The money has been earmarked
for such matters as scholarships,
faculty salaries, fellowships for
faculty research and summer
teaching, the New York Times re-
ported.
The foundation said that it
granted $5 million last fall to the
United Negro College Fund for
building and other capital im-
provements.
The new grants will go to eight
Negro schools and to the Atlantic
University Center, which consists
of five predominantly Negro insti-
tutions.

21 provinces, to advocates of a
strengthened central government
in Leopoldville.
After 100 days of debate, the
Luluabourg commission emerged
with what ex-Premier .Joseph Ileo,
its chairman, termed "a delicate
oompromise." The commission
members have been campaigning
for adoption of the draft.
Adoula once indicated his gov-
ernment wanted to make some
changes, but he had second
thoughts when commission mem-
bers sent up a howl of protest.

MONTGOMERY, Ala,. OP)-The+
attraction of Arizona Sen. Barry
Goldwater to uncounted numbers
of dissident Democrats has creat-
ed a new problem for the un-
pledged elector movement in the
South.
At least one states' rights Demo-
crat has expressed fear that Gold-
water's vote against the civil rights
bill in the Senate may take some
of the steam out of the free elec-
tors' cause.
But Alabama's Gov. George
Wallace, the symbol of a hoped-
for rebellion against both major
parties, is quick to discount the
Goldwater influence. He wants
the South to assert its independ-
ence and try to gain the balance
of power in the presidential elec-
tion.
Withhold Majority
Wallace, a Democrat, is labor-
ing to corral enough Southern
electoral votes to keep either Pres-
ident Lyndon B. Johnson or the

JOSEPH KASAVUBU

Colored ballots are an answer to
the illiteracy of the vast majority.
The voter will cast a green ballot
for "yes" or a black ballot for
The new constitution, which
would give President Kasavubu
executive authority similar to that
enjoyed by French President
Charles de Gaulle, was written in
Luluabourg earlier this year by
factional leaders from all over the
country,
Compromise
They represented almost all
shades of opinion from Katanga's
ex-secessionists, who pressed for
increased autonomy in the Congo's

Medic Doubts
Smoking Role
In Coronaries
SAN FRANCISCO (R) - A New
York heart specialist, reporting on
a survey of 12,000 professional
persons, said yesterday that job
stress is closely linked to coronary
heart disease-but smoking may
not be.
The survey covered 14 occupa-
tional groups with "obvious differ-
ences" in job tensions, Dr. Henry
I. Russek, consultant in cardio-
vascular disease for the United
States Public Health Service Hos-
pital, said.
Persons who said they never
had smoked showed significantly
higher coronary heart disease
rates than those who stopped
smoking before their attack or be-
fore the questionnaire,_he said.

Draft To Check
18-.Year-Olds
LANSING - Selective Service
boards in the state will begin
physical examinations of 18-year-
old males in July to enable them
to plan their futures better on
the basis of their qualification or
disqualification for military serv-
ice.
State Director of Selective Serv-
ice Col. Arthur A. Holmes stressed
that the examinations were not a
speedup of the draft. The Service
has initiated a program for re-
ferral of disqualified registrants
to community rehabilitation, and
only those young men who are not
deferred will be ordered for the
examination.
This will eliminate those who
are married, attending school or
enrolled in reserve officers train-
ing corps programs.
The early examinations will
not have any effect when the
men are actually inducted.

GOP nominee from getting the re-
quired majority.
If Wallace can gain control of
the electoral votes of half a dozen
Southern States, he will have a
block of at least 53. In a close
election, he figures that will be
enough to keep either of the ma-
jor party nominees from getting
the 270 electoral votes needed to
win.
And then, he says, the South,
with the balance of power, could
demand concessions on civil rights.
Gain Commitment
In half a dozen states he is
striving to get the electors com-
mitted to him as a presidential
candidate or left free to vote for
somebody else besides the major
party nominee.
At the moment, he cannot be
sure of any state except his own.
The Democratic elector slate in
Alabama has refused to promise its
support to Johnson but is not
committed to anyone else, includ-
ing Wallace. In time, however, the
unpledged nominees will almost
certainly come out openly for the
governor.
Wallace has run into opposition
in some instances from Democratic
leaders unwilling to go against the
national party. To offset that,
his backers have circulated peti-
tions asking the voters to put his
name on the ballot as a third
party candidate.
Petitions are being passed
around in North and South Caro-
lina and probably will be later in
Arkansas and Georgia. Similar ef-
forts also may be made in Vir-
ginia, Texas and Florida.
Choice in 'Ole Miss
Voters in Louisiana and Missis-
sippi are already assured of a
choice between elector tickets
pledged to the Alabama governor
and rival slates committed to
Johnson.
Wallace sees no basic difference
between unpledged electors--where
that is possible-and a third par-
ty ticket elsewhere. In both in-
stances, he says, the effect is the
same-to keep the votes away from
the major parties,

the indirect cost question.
In pressing his case, Sawyer has
been helped by an accounting
document from the government's
executive branch. Issued by the
Bureau on the Budget, it is known
as Circular A-21-intended for
use in both contract and grant
cases. The form provides an ac-
counting for indirect costs facts.
These costs, the circular states in
part, "aie those which . . . are
not readily subject to treatment
as direct costs of research agree-
ments or other activities."
The legislative response is that
grants are an outright gift to
the University and administrators
should be willing to bear part of
the outgrowing costs.
While Sawyer concedes that this
point has some justification, he
rebuts that "the grants have been
contracted because they are of
value to the national welfare." In
addition, he observes that many
of the grants are for highly spe-
cialized services which are more
than compensated for.
His arguments have not gone
on deaf ears. With the death of
Clarence Cannon (Do-Mo), pow-
erful House Appropriations Com-
mittee chairman, a major ob-
struction has been removed. A

i

GOV. GEORGE WALLACE

(Continued from Page 1)

"If Goldwater wins the Repub-
lican nomination, he will have to
embrace the party platform, and
that's what is important rather
than a single vote on the civil
rights bill. And the Republican
platform certainly will endorse the
civil rights bill," Wallace said.
"If the Southern votes go to
Goldwater we won't have any
bargaining power. The only way
we can exercise our power is to
withhold our votes from both par-
ties."
HEW Report:
School Costs Up
The cost of a college education
has risen,
A 5.1 per cent increase for men
and 4.5 per cent increase for
women was reported for students
attending private colleges and uni-
versities by the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare in
a recent survey of 92 per cent of
the nationas colleges.
Also reported was a one per cent
increase for both men and women
attending public institutions out-
side their own state and a 4.2 per
cent increase in costs for students
attending a public school in their
home state.

,

spokesman for George Mahon (D-
Tex), the new chairman, sees "def-
mnite possibilities in the future
for reduced restrictions on indi-
rect expenses."
Sawyer will retire within months
now, but there are a flock of oth-
er educators from Harvard to
Berkeley who will continue in
their fight to have the limitations
eased or dropped.
Whether they succeed or not,
the University will always remem-
ber its quiet, just fighter of the
unjust cost.
Students End
ILUAC Protest
MINNEAPOLIS - A group of
citizens and students from Min-
neapolis will finish a three-day
picket of the House Un-Ameri-
can Activities Committee today.
Placards carried by the demon-
strators emphasize their "opposi-
tion to the basic premise of the
committee (HUAC) -that 'certain
ideas are somehow 'un-American'
and should be suppressed," Denis
Wadley, press secretary for the
committee, said.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3654 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
FRIDAY, JUNE 26
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar No. 115a-Thomas L. Moffat, The
Management Institute, the University
of Wisconsin, "Skills Workshop in Em-
ployment Interviewing". Room 3-D,
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Institute on Areawide Planning of
Medical Care Services and Facilities-
Conference: Room 3042, School of
Public Health, 9 a.m.
Institute on Collegfe and University
Administration-Third Floor Conference
Room, Michigan Union, 9:30 a.m.,
Educational Film Preview - "The
Lawyers," at 1:30 p.m. in the Under-
graduate Library Multipurpose Room.

General Notices
French and German Screening Exams:
The screening exams in French and Ger-
man for Doctoral candidates will be ad-
ministered on Mon., June 29 from 3-5
p.m. in Aud. B, Ar1ell Hall. Doctoral
candidates must pass the screening
examination before taking the written
test in French or German, unless they
have received B or better in French 111
or German 111. Those whogfailthe
examination may take it again when
the test is administered in July.
Regents' Meeting: July 24. Commu-
nications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than July 10.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
State of Michigan Civil Service - 1.
Social Worker Al-2 hrs. recent exper.
in social work or related areas. OR 2
yrs. of study with courses in the so-
cial sciences. 2. Child Welfare Worker
Al-BA degree with not less than 30
hrs. in the social or related sciences.
Research Organization in Ann Ar-
bor Area - Seeking Assistant in Re-
search. Will be Ass't. to a Res. Psy-
chologist. Permanent position. Will work
with minimum of supv. BA in Psych.
pref., but other considered. Trng. in
Experimental Psych. pref., knowledge
of Programming highly desirable. Age
22-30. Would consider someone who has
not finished degree.
Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind.-
Many & various openings including:
Microbiologist, Indust. Engnr. Com-
mercial Chemicals Specialist, Account-
ant, Cost Acc't., Budget Analyst, Inter-
nal Auditor, Financial Analyst, Sr. Plant
Physiologist, Sr. Bacteriologist, Sr.
Pharmacologist, Chemists (org., analyt.,
phys.), etc.
U.S. Civil Service-Openings for Staff
Nurses-3 yr. course in an approved
school of nursing or 2-yr. course & 1
yr. exper.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Agency for International Develop-
ment-Need secretaries to serve over-
seas in the foreign aid prog. An AID
rep. will be in Detroit for 2 weeks
conducting interviews from Mon., June
22 through Thurs., July 2. Miss Doro-
thy Boulos will interview at the Michi-
gan State Employment Service office,
1145 Griswold St., 9th floor, Detroit,
weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Group
interviews will be held Wed, evening,
July 1. Aptps. may be made by phoning
Miss Boulos at 222-1855. Open to wom-
en with secretarial exper. & good short-
hand & typing. Must be single, high sch.
graduate, at least 21 yrs., U.S. citizen-
ship. Appts. are for 2 yrs. Positions
also avail, ateWash., D.C. hdqts with
min age here of 18.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

Barry Lands Possibility
Of War with Red China

...

O--

By The Associated Press

TUCSON-Presidential aspirant
Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz)
yesterday lauded recent statements
that the United States would risk
war with Red China to preserve
freedom in Southeast Asia.
He made the statement in a
speech calling on Henry Cabot
Lodge to address the people and
"tell them why the policy in Viet
Nam went wrong and how it can
be repaired."
Lodge, who resigned as ambas-
sador to South Viet Nam two days
ago to help Pennsylvania's Gov.
William Scranton defeat Goldwa-
ter for the GOP presidential nom-
ination, had stated that he did
not think Viet Nam would be an
issue in the November campaign.
Carry a Big Stick
Goldwater said that if the U.S.
had spoken of possible war with

Red China months ago, it would
not have the current Southeast
Asia problems.
Red China would have backed
down just like Russia did in Cuba,
he continued.
Goldwater said the United States
is headed for World War III if it
continues its present foreign poli-
cy and that the nation must have
a full and frank accounting of
what has gone on in Southeast
Asia. "This administration has
been building a crisis in secret."
B-47's
The senator decried reports that
the U.S. was considering the burn-
ing of B-47 bombers for similar
action by Russia.
"We can't find one instance of
a strong nation ever going into
war," he said. "It is foolish to
think you can appease an enemy
by becoming weaker than they."

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The towering adventure
triumph that must be seen
...and seen again! The
Winner of 27 Internation-
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Awards!
ALEC GUI NESIC HWKINS

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered organiza-
tions only. Organizations who are plan-
ning to be active for the Summer
Term should be registered by July 3,
1964. Forms available, 1011 Sturent Ac-
tivities Bldg.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation talk
by Rev. Paul R. Dotson, director, Prot-
estant Foundation for International
Students, speaks on "Southern Hospi-
tality: Mississippi Style," Wed., July 1,
at 7:30 p.m., Hillel Bldg., 1429 Hill St.
s* * 4
Graduate Outing Club, Swiming and/
or hiking, June 28, 1:45 p.m., Rackham,
Huron St. entrance.

Rent a TV this Summer
NEW 19" G.E. PORTABLES
only $10.00 per month
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TV set on display at Follett's Bookstore
CalNEJAC TV 7
phone: NO 2-5671

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[illel Foundation

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