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June 25, 1964 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1964-06-25

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V

9:

S&emi,-Thirdyaear
EDITED AND MANACUSM By STUDENTS OF THE UNITERSrrT OW MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHOR2TY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
"Where Opinons Are Fre STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG., ANN Ajuo9L, MimN., PHONE NO 2-3241
Truth W111, Preail"
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in at repvints.
THURSDAY, JUNE 25, 1964 NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT HIPPLER

Sparkling 'My Fair Lady' Premieres

General Maxwell Taylor:
Ballistics Not Linguistics

I,

AS GENERAL Maxwell Taylor tackles
his Saigon assignment, the specter of
an independent and neutralized South-
east Asia fades into the South China
mist. Taylor, heralded as a linguistics
expert and philosopher, has been dis-
patched as a resolute and muscular army
The Chief
. EDGAR HOOVER'S name is a house-
hold word. He is a hero to millions of
decent Americans, an an anathema to
evil men, President Lyndon B. Johnson
declared recently.
The occasion was a ceremony honoring
Hoover, at which Johnson announced,
"I have today signed an executive order
exempting (him) from compulsory retire-
ment for an indefinite period of time."
Thus the nation's Chief of Police was
established permanently in his job of
tracking down our more successful and
ambitious criminals. But unlike most 1o-
cal chiefs (and somewhat like his coun-
terparts in Stalinist Russia), J. Edgar
Hoover interprets his job quite broadly.
"Law enforcement," it seems, involves
preserving The American Way of Life
from legal as well as illegal assaults.
In the latest issue of The "FBI Law
Enforcement Bulletin," the Chief seems
to be worried about the younger genera-
tion, particularly the high-school and col-
lege grads: "We might well ask ourselves
if we have fully acquainted them with the
time-honored principles which have made
America great."
NOT THAT WE shouldn't be allowed to
ridicule or criticize our institutions and
officials, you understand - "this is no
complaint against the inherent rights of
public criticism and freedom of expres-
sion." It's just that things have gone too
far. "My objection is against the whole-
sale defilement and universal downgrad-
ing of our treasured freedoms and institu-
tions-the time-tested attributes of de-
mocracy which are manifested in a rep-
resentative government ruled by law."
Household Word's advice was labeled as
a "Message from the Director" and ad-
dressed "to All Law-Enforcement Offi-.
cials."- Now, one might wonder just what
these wise words have to do with law en-
forcement, just how they are going to
help "all la'w enforcement officials" catch
bank robbers and outwit gangsters. One
might wonder, in fact, just what business
this dedicated public servant has prosely-
~izing his own political views in a gov-
ernment publication.
pERHAPS ONE FURTHER excerpt from
the Message from the Director will
clarify matters. "Obviously, no one seri-
ously suggests that all congressmen,
judges, prosecutors, law enforcement of-
,ficers, city officials and other authorities
are jelly-brained nincompoops as fre-
quently featured." Perhaps Hoover is
afraid that someone soon will seriously
suggest that they are. And for someone
who seems to be trying to hold all those
positions at once, that would indeed be a
rather bleak development.
-KENNETH WINTER
Co-Editor
Published daily Tuesday through Saturday morning.
Snummer subsriptin rates $2 by carrier, $2.50 by mail.
-Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mcb.

figure to take over what was once a
diplomatic post. His presence can only
salt the conflict which two Geneva ac-
cords have not succeeded in healing.
Taylor's appointment may not mean the
U.S. is at the brink of war. But it is an-
other point along a foreign policy tan-
gent which is leading farther and farther
from peace and conciliation.
The beginning of this path away from
peace was apparent a month ago when
Adlai Stevenson presented a major
Southeast Asia analysis in a speech to the
United Nations.
"UNITED STATES POLICY for South-
east Asia is very simple," he said. "It
is the restoration of peace so that the
peoples of that area can go about their
own independent business in whatever
associations they may freely choose for
themselves without interference from the
outside."
But the remainder of the speech belied
these words. In, between his calls for
peace and, independence, Stevenson was
bristling , with harsh words about "Com-
munist duplicity" in that area.
There is only one reason why there is
fighting in Viet Nam today, he said, and
that is "because the political settlement
for Viet Nam reached at Geneva in 1954
has been deliberately and flagrantly and
systematically violated."
HIS ACCUSATION pertained to the
armistice agreement drawn up in 1954,
mainly by Russia and the British, to end
the Indo-China war. It called for a parti-
tioning of Viet Nam and guaranteed
Cambodia and Laos "territorial integri-
ty." The United States, although a non-
signatory, did issue a unilaterl state-
ment pledging not to militarily disrupt
the armistice.
Stevenson did not mention that the
U.S. was guilty of violations of the ter-
ritorial integrity of these countries con-
trary to both the 1954 agreement and a
subsequent 1962 truce which it did sign
on Laos-by illegally maintaining troops
in the area and by obstructing elections.
Stevenson's lofty and hypocritical cri-
ticisms were part of an image-retouching
job'he was performing. Under orders from
Washington, Stevenson's prescribed task
was to justify the maintenance of U.S.
troops in Southeast Asia.
THE STEVENSON SPEECH- and one de-
livered by Secretary McNamara a few
days later marked the end of the justifi-
cation phase of Southeast Asian policy.
The dispatch of Taylor yesterday con-
firmed what had been underscoring U.S.
policy for weeks: Laos and Viet Nam were
only the boxing ring for round one with
China. But what presages disaster is that
by sending in Taylor, the nation's top
heavyweight, the United States has be?
come committed to a hard-punch policy
in the hope that China will duck or back
off.
But Peiping, in effect, may feel itself
dared to make some sort of aggressive
counter-punch, thus diminishing the
chances of withdrawal to a neutral cor-
ner-by either side.
The exact repercussions of Taylor's ap-
pointment cannot be known as the red-
white-and-blue general moves brusquely
into his corner.
But one thing is sure: neither Mao, or
Nikita, or the hopes for peace will give
hail to the colors.
-LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM

THE UNIVERSITY PLAYERS opened their summer season last night
with a vibrant, yet sensitive production of Lerner and Loewe's "My
Fair Lady." a musical adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygma-
lion."
Prof. Ralph Herbert of the School of Music accomplished the
difficult role of Prof. Henry Higgins in a professional manner showing
outstanding moments of humor and timing in the blustery comic
scenes and numbers such as "I'm an Ordinary Man" and "Hymn to
Him," and gentle sensitivity in his rendition of "I've Grown Accustomed
to Her Face."
Maria Bahas as Eliza Doolittle showed that she not only has a
lovely voice, but is a very skilled young actress as well. William Tay-
lor's bombastic Colonel Pickering afforded the audience many hearty
laughs as did Gary Schaub's Alfred P. Doolittle. Freddy Eynsford-Hill
portrayed by Warren Jaworski showed fine vocal control in his ballad
"On the Street Where You Live."
Notable supporting performances were turned in by Joyce Edgar
as Freddy's mother; Ellen Tyler as Mrs. Pearce; Evelyn Max as Hig-
gin's mother: and Richard Esekilsen as Zoltan Karpathy, the Hun-
garain linguist.
THIS PRODUCTION was blessed with one of the, finest choruses
to be seen and heard in a long time. Capably directed by Morton
Achter, they sang well together and successfully and enthusiastically
brought off the dance numbers choreographed by Gay Delanghe.. Miss
Delanghe showed a fine sense of economy of movement in handling
the large chorus in a limited physical space and all of the dance num-
bers were performed with amazing precision and clarity.
One of the most exciting visual moments in the production was
brought about through the costuming of Zelma Weisfield in the satir-
ically funny "Ascot Gavotte."
TIlE ENTIRE production was very ably directed by the Speech
Department's Guest Director Nafe E. Katter, who can be duly proud
of his cast's achievements in presenting a difficult production so well
in a short period of rehearsal time.
In all respects, the work done by this group in their opening pro-
duction is indicative of long hours of hard work, effort, and enthusiasm.
-Janet E. O'Brien
TODAY AND TOMORROW
Economy Grows Under
New Fiscal Po lc

-Dally-Kamalakar Rao ;
THAT COMMON DUSTMAN Alfred P. Doolittle (Gary Schaub, center) gives a piece of advice on the
handling of his daughter Eliza (Maria Bahas, right) to Prof. Henry Higgins (Prof. Ralph Herbert, left)
who is teaching her to drop her cockney mutterings for the refined speech of a lady. Doolittle's advice?
Wallop her!
PRESIDENTIAL RACE:
Electoral Votes Uncertain

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
second yin a series of articles on
the Republican Party.
By MICHAEL HARRAH
PRESIDENT JOHNSON may or
may not be a tremendously
popular individual; the point is
debatable, and probably isn't too
important.
The important point is: Where
will Johnson find the ELECTORAL
votes in November to guarantee
him a fine, fat, four-year term
in the White House?
Looking back to 1960, the vote
was close; the Democrats barely'
squeaked through. In fact, if the
1960 census had been in effect
and the electoral college had vot-
ed according to the latest ap-
portionment of electoral votes, the
margin would have been even
narrowed. The actual count stood
at 303 (Kennedy), 219 (Nixon),
and 15 (Byrd). Under the new
census, it would have been 290-
231-14.
THIS MEANS THAT, under the
new census, a switch of just 30
electoral votes from the Demo-
crats to the Republicans could
cost Johnson the election, all oth-
er factors remaining constant. In
fact, it's almost a sure bet this
time that the Alabama electors
that went to Kennedy (five of the
11 voted for the late President,
the rest went to Byrd) will fol-
low the bidding of Gov. George
Wallace, who cannot be described
as a Johnson supporter. So that's
five more off the Democrats' to-
tal, making the magic number to
switch just 28. Illinois alone has
26.
The GOP in 1960 carried 26
states, only two of which cannot.
be counted as consistent Republi-
can states: California and Ohio..
In neither of these states do
things look exactly promising for
the Democrats. In California, the
Democrats are split in the bitter
factional fight between Gov. Pat
Brown and House Speaker Jesse
Unruh. The latter's candidate for
the Senate, Pierre Salinger, upset
Brown's hand-picked boy, State
Controller Alan Cranston, and it
is no secret that Unruh wants
Brown's job in 1966. The Re-
publicans, on the other hand, are
not united either (the divisive
issue is Goldwater), so this state
could well be up for grabs.
* * *
IN OHIO, the Democrats are
practically in a total 'rout. The
GOP now has the statehouse in
firm control. (The Democrats had
it in 1960.) Sen. Frank Lausche,
nominally a Democrat, is a con-
stant GOP ally. Sen. Stephen M.
Young, actually a Democrat and
74 years old, struggled through a

primary battle with astronaut
John Glenn (who wasn't even run-
nling) and didn't show too well.
He now faces Rep. Robert Taft,
Jr., who won a smashing primary
victory and bears the magic (in
Ohio) Taft namve. What's more,
GOP chairman Ray Bliss has a
firm organization; Democrat Wil-
liam L. Coleman has a bickering
mess.
Perhaps Johnson can expect to
get somewhere in California; for
that state has always been any-
one's guess. He's as good as dead
in Ohio.
Furthermore, while Kennedy
carried 22 states in 1960, several
are not what can be called safe-
ly Democratic: Illinois, Michigan,
Minnesota, New York and Penn-
slyvania.
In Illinois in 1960, the Demo-
crats put up Judge Otto Kerner
tC. oppose two-term GOP Gov. Wil-
ham Stratton, whose administra-
tion was laden with corruption.
He was, to say the least, in Ill-
repute. In addition, the Republi-
cans were in general disarray, due
to a factional fight between those
in Cook County and those down-
state-a fight which ended in
Democratic control of a Republi-
can dominated legislature.
* * C
THIS YEAR, the shoe is on the
other foot. Because of strict wel-
fare reforms, Kerner has not been
ait all-around popular governor
even among members of his own
party, and he is facing former
Bell & Howell President Charles
Percy, a nationally known figure
who keynoted the GOP national
convention in 1960.
The Republicans having purged
the Cook County dissidents are
generally in better accord among
themselves. Since Kennedy didn't
win by much there in 1960, the
state 'doesn't look at all safe for
Democrats in 1964.
In Michigan, too, the scene is
somewhat less favorable tlhan be-
fore. In 1960, Democratic Lt. Gov.
John B. Swainson was facing two-
tzme loser Paul Bagwell, in what
turned out to be a close contest
for theugovernorship. Swainson
pulled it out, due to the fact that
the Democrats were united, while
Republicans were feuding among
themselves-a rift which is still
not entirely healed.
* * *
TODAY, the Republicans occu-
pS the governor's chair in the per-
son 'of Gov. George Romney, a na-
tionally acclaimed figure who has
definite bi-partisan appeal. Oppos-
ing him will be Rep. Neil Staebler,
who, though he has been in Dem-
ocratic politics for many years, is
still relatively unknown. Thus,
Michigan could easily swing back
into its Republican tradition -

especially since Lyndon Johnson
is not overly popular here.
Minnesota is, not blessed this
time with Sen. Hubert Humphrey
seeking re-election, but Democrat
Gov. Karl Rolvaag is up for grabs
again. He wons two years ago by
a scant 100 some odd votes, in an
election that was uncertain for
months. His victory left much bit-
terness, and Republicans could
capitalize on this.
New York, of course, depends
on what Gov. Nelson Rockefeller
decides to do, and whether or not
he has the political strength any
more to do it. GOP Sen. Kenneth
B. Keating is up for re-election,
and the Democrats are clearly at a
loss for someone to oppose him.
Still and all, this can't be count-
ed safe for either party.
FOUR YEARS AGO, Derocratic
Gov. David Lawrence held the
Pennsylvania statehouse in his
firm control; today he is out, and
Republican Gov. William W.
Scranton is in. Scranton, has been
popular, and his popularity has
rubbed off across the state, reduc-
ing traditional Democratic majori-
ties in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh,
and other urban centers by a tre-
mendous margin. Here too the
Democrats are in trouble,
So a switch of merely 30 elec-
toral votes from' the Democrats
t= the Republicans--a switch of
just Illinois (or, Texas, even) and
South Carolina--could add Lyn-
don Johnson to the list of ex-
presidents.
Such a switch is far from out
rdf the question, regardless of how
many popularity points Johnson
has or how many=popular votes he
may get. He still could lose. And
like Thomas E. Dewey in 1948, his
chances are getting better all the
time.
NEXT: How Goldwater might
be stopped.

By. WALTER LIPPMANN
FOR SOME FIVE months the
country has been doing busi-
ness under an altogether unpre-
cedented fiscal policy. With the
adoption of the tax cut of $11.5
billion in February, we began for
the first time in our history Lo
operate under a deficit planned
to bring about full employment.
In the face of an estimated
budgetary deficit of $5.5 billion,
the cdnservative policy would have
been to raise taxes in the hope of
balancing the budget. Instead, the
Kennedy-Johnson administration
has reduced taxes, an act which
was bound at least at first to in-
crease the deficit.
* The action was taken on the
new theory, accepted by most, but
not by all economists, that a big
expansion of consumption and
capital investment was necessary
to overcome the chronic sluggish-
ness of the American economy
during the past 10 years, with its
high rate of unemployment and
its rather low utilizationof indus-
trial capacity.
FOR THE SAKE of the record,
we must recognize that this plan-,
ned deficit on top of an unplan-
ned deficit is an innovation that
goes beyond anything the 'New
Deal ever did under Roosevelt and
Truman.
Until the second world war im-
posed enormous deficits, the

FRENCH POLITICS
Defferre Would Gain
By Opposing.dle Gaulle

Roosevelt New Dealers held-but
not until the later 1930s - that
deficits were justified only to off-
set recessions, to compensate for
the downswing of the business
cycle. In the upswing, they be-
lieved that the right policy was
to have a budgetary surplus in
order to restrict the expansionf
the boom. But the Kennedy-
Johnson tax cut of 1964 was tro-
posed and enacted durns. am up-
swing. It is therefore a mo riovel
experiment, even by the standards
of the New Deal.
The experiment runs counter to
the central principles of what is
regarded as fiscal integrity by such
men as Gen. Dwight Eisenhower,
Sen. Harry Byrd, Sen. Barry Gold-
water and, indeed, it is fair to say,
a host of public men in both par-
ties.
* * *
THE EVIDENCE to date is that
the fears of the opposition are as
yet unfulfilled - and that the
hopes of the proponents are in 'ar
measure atleast just beginning
to be fulfilled. None of this is,
of course, conclusive. It is too
soon to be certain now about what
will happen as the expansion con-
tinues, and therefore among critics
and advocates alike it is only
sensible to keep an open and in-
quiring mind.
*Nevertheless, there is as yet no
evidence that the worst fears are
being realized. Indeed, there is
impressive evidence to the con-
trary. Thus, confronted by the new
tax law, many have, pophesied;
that it would mean inflation, a
flight' from the dollar, destruction
of confidence, bad business and
increased unemployment.
Thus, we are not in the grip of
price inflation. 'The American
wholesale price index has re-
mained constant since the begin-
ning of 1958, and the American
record of price stability has no
equal in any large industrial cou-
try - in, the world. This has mhade
possible a steadily increasing ex-
port surplus, which is helping to
reduce the international payments
deficit that has been so worri-
some. The other contribution to a
sounder international payments
situationis that a busin ' boom
sin theUnited States hasmade it
attractive to invest American dol-
lars at home and to bring in hard
currencies from abroad.
THERE IS as yet no evidence
that the planned deficit has un-
dermined business confidence. The
most recent government survey of
business investment indicates that
in the past year there has been an
increase of 12 per cent in pur-
chases for plant and equipment.
Business profits have gone up.
Consumer buying has gone up.
There is a noticeable, thougn not
a large, decline in the rate of un-
employment, indicating that while
some unemployment is "struc-
tural," some of it is caused by
.slack business.
IF IN THE end the experiment
works out, 'as it shows signs of
doing today, there will be a change
in the concept of fiscal integrity.
It will no longer be identified
with an insistence on balancina

By DEBORAH BEATTIE
Daily Correspondent

FEIFFER

NOW HAV AP R5AV
M6 CgRTA1M REPORTS~,
rrCMS OF W5, THAT
( AVC TRIO TO1 961V TR6
THAT ILAM ON OE y'0
OF of I TH[N&toDR. THAT'
I AM ON T T06 M6R..OW
W IAL , U-WRON&-
MY wTtON CL.FAR.

I FM NOT NOR P I INTrEND
t0 BE THE L~EAMROf ANY
STOP OR? START MOVEMENT
-AND THIS K C0MPG6t1 Y IN
~LIN4E WITHrf MY POLICY WHEN
I' WA'5 PiEIpEN1'AND If DID
NOT EVER 5TOPO6R START
ANYTHI'NG THEN ANDL fI
NOT KNOW WHY I SHOUtA)

C
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/

NOWZ I ~NK IT i5 CON515T6NT- Tgt
VEW 11 UC)N',VWNT WITH MY VIEWS
OF GOVERNMENT AND HAVE ALW4AYS
SEEN. I AM A&AtNST 8I& (6OVefuMEN'
ANp 01& 14APEP5If2 ANP I THffN
THESE ThfNG65, T"1 I-IKE T!4A',;
S~dCLfL I DCfD6f'P 3Y L-TThC
60VeiRWNjT AN L JTW &tAOCR-
5H I p To GQUOTE -THOMAS ' JFFER3&N
'THAT W'VERNMENT IS 665T WHOC
t5 NOT THE ol-pFR ThN6. AND SC5
FORTH," OR WORP5 TO THAT £.FF61

I
i
I
1
I
l

THE FRENCH presidential cam-
paign picture has never been a
clear one, and it won't be until
President de. Gaulle states defin-
itely whether or not he will pre-
sent himself as a candidate in
1965. However, in spite of his
silence, or perhaps because of it,
de Gaulle has been assumed to be
the potential number one can-
didate; Socialist candidate, Gas-
ton Defferre, mayor of Marseille,
has emerged as his only important
opposition.
Thus the campaign picture to
date has been that of. a rather
well-defined bi-partisan contest
and Defferre's position w a s
encouraging. Unfortunately, de
Gaulle's recent illness, making it
probable that he will not run
again, complicates Defferre's stra-
tegy and may turn the political
climate into one of confusion all
too characteristic of the pre-de
Gaulle era.
In spite of the fact that the
General appears to be politically
invincible, Defferre's pursuit of
the presidency is most likely to be
successful if he is able to cam-
paign against de Gaulle and his
personal regime. As the Socialist

tries, which France can't afford
due to economic problems at home.
Neither does the president have.
particularly strong support for his
blatant attacks on the United
States and the Soviet Union.
Therefore, Defferre would benefit
from de. Gaulle's candidacy in two
ways.
First of all, it gives him a clear
and meaningful basis for opposi-
tion. Secondly, in this first presi-
dential election by universal suf-
frage, the defeat of de Gaulle
would be an indisputable political
mandate.,
If de Gaulle does not seek re-
election, the campaign will evolve
into an ill-defined political jungle
of weak candidates, reminiscent
of the Fourth Republic, Already
the list of declared and potential
presidential candidates is exces-
sive.
If, however, the campaign cen-
ters around two strong candidates'
this surfeit of candidates will not
.be able to create an atmosphere
of political instability. The most
the 'other parties can hopeto ac-
complish is to sway the vote in
one of the two directions.
* * *.
SHOULD DE GAULLE decide
not to run again, he will make it

NpOW TW~ S !NOTMWANT 1TO SAY

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