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July 21, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

V, JULY 21,E1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

111 1I W I MM

PIJOENIX PROJECT
Nuclear Reactor Hard at Work

Martin, Romney Appraise GOP

E

I.

(Continued from Page 1)

irradiated objects radioactive. The
Cobalt 60 sources emit gamma
rays which irradiate but do not
make objects radioactive.
Normal Decay
"Two reasons the cobalt sources
are being replaced at this 'time,"
H. G. Olson, Phoenix Lab su-
pervisor said, "are that the Cobalt
60 had normally decayed, and de-
mand for use has increased.
"The increase in strength means
we can undertake research pro-
grams we couldn't do before, and
we can irradiate faster because the
dose rate is higher."
The strength of the source is
now about double what was avail-
able before, he said, but not simply
because fresh #radioactive cobalt
has been installed. The new con-
figuration of the source gives a
higher radiation "flux." This
means that experiments can be
put in and removed more quickly
because they get their total radia-
tion dose faster.
Cobalt Sources
Demand on the services of the
Phoenix Project's two cobalt
sources has increased substan-
tially. during the past year from
both University and outside re-
search groups.
"Mote people are using gamma
rays for experiments," Olson ex-
plained. "Also, it's routine now to
Blondy Announces
For Congress Seat,
DETROIT (A) - Sen. Charles
Blondy (D-Detroit) filed nominat-
ing petitions for a congressional
seat Friday.
He will run in the new First
Congressional District, which in-
cludes much of the territory in
which he has been winning legis-
lative elections since 1940.

provide irradiated bone and car-
tilege for hospitals.
"And, as one researcher pub-
lishes the results of his experi-
ments with gamma irradiation,
more and more get ideas as to
how they might also use gamma,
radiation in.their fields."
Food Sciences
Much of the demand recently
has come from the department of
food sciences and department of
horticulture at Michigan State
University of Agriculture and Ap-
plied Sciences. They are experi-
menting with radiation as a means
of retarding food spoilage, and
are also trying to get beneficial
mutations in plants.
Fish pasteurization through ir-
radiation is being studied by the
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries,
while Bendix Systems Division on
North Campus and Bendix Re-
search Division of Detroit are ir-
radiating electronic components
to test their reliability in a space
environment. Wayne State Univer-
sity is irradiating solid materials
in a study of basic properties.
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital ir-
radiates cartilege for grafting, as
well as animal food to make it
germ-free for feeding animal
colonies.
Eye Corneas
The Medical Center uses the
Cobalt 60 source for sterilizing
eye corneas.
Radiation from the reactor con-
sists of streams of neutrons, which
are solid particles, as well as gam-
ma rays, which are electromagne-
tic radiation, very much like in-
tense X-rays.
Thle neutrons are used not only
to p'roduce radioactive materials
(Cobalt 60 is made radioactive by
bombarding Cobalt 59 in a reactor,
for example), but also as a probe
to reveal atomic structure and
energy levels.
Although the reactor also has
been used extensively by various

PROFESSOR KERR
industrial groups and firms, its'
greatest use now is by the nuclear
engineering and physics depart-
ment, according to J. B. Bullock,
reactor supervisor.
Usage Rises
"The reactor is running over,
400 hours a month now," he said,
"with four experiments going con-
tinuously. Our usage is up about
40 per cent over last year."
At two megawatts, the reactor is
exceeded in power by no other
university research reactor in the
country, and, Bullock believes,
none is used more.
The entire Phoenix research fa-
cilities are unique in Michigan.
Besides the reactor and Colbalt 60
sources, the Phoenix labs have
two hot cells, for remote handling
of radioactive materials, the only
ones in the state. In addition,
there are several laboratories for
physics, chemistry, zoological and
bacteriological experiments, and
greenhouse and an aquarium.

(Continued from Page 1)
lift a finger to help Romney's
gubernatorial campaign.
Hard Fight
At the Republican convention,
Romney fought hard but unsuc-
cessfully to strengthen the 1964
platform on the matter of extrem-
ism and civil rights.
Virtually all observers agree
that implementation of the new
federal civil rights law will be a
major campaign issue on the na-
tional level, in view of Goldwater's
vote against passage of the meas-
ure.
"One of the clouds hanging
over this campaign is the question
of how much it's going to turn on
the views of and the pressures
brought to bear by the racist and
segregationist elements in this
country," GOP National Commit-
teeman John Martin of Grand
Rapids says.
No Appeal
"I thinkathe Republican party
has to stand squarely on this
problem and has to repudiate that
kind of thing. It has to make sure
this campaign is not conducted
with any appeal to elements of
that sort.
"The question of extremism is
also tied to this civil rights situa-
tion because many of these ex-
tremist groups are also racist
gIoups. So for that reason our
position on extremism was also
related to our position on civil
rights."
Martin said there are extremists
in Michigan who want "to capital-
ize on fear and hate and bigotry
and who want to do it through
the Republican party.
No Temptation
"We can see what's going on
around the country," Martin add-
ed. "And it's absolutely vital that
this party of ours not be allowed
to be tempted by any of the pos-
sibilities that some of the extrem-
ist groups throw up to suggest
that there may be votes to be

gained by particular positions of
that kind.
"We have the situation reason-
ably under control in Michigan,
but they keep trying."
Martin was disturbed by the
booing and catcalls which re-
verberated from the packed gal-
leries in the Cow Palace the night
New York Gov. Nelson Rocke-
feller, a Goldwater critic, spoke to
the convention.
No Expression
"This is typical of these groups,
that is, a complete intolerance,"
.Detroit Eyes
.Defense Cut
Four out of five Detroiters be-
lieve that a major cutback in De-
fense spending would have serious
or disastrous effects on the econ-
omy, and two out of three Detroit
community leaders believe that
such a cutback would have man-
agable or no bad effects on the
health of the economy.
Prof. Otto Feinstein of Wayne
State University, has found that
the evidence supports the com-
munity leaders and that the in-
formation- of the average Detroit-
er, although rooted in the history
of the state, is wrong and can
have negative effects on our econ-
omy and foreign policy.
His new study, "Michigan Eco-
nomic Myths: Defense Spending
and Employment since World War
II," was recently published by
Wayne State's Monteith College.
In it he indicates that less than
21,000 Michigan workers are en-
gaged in defense or defense relat-
ed work and that less than two
per cent of income and employ-
ment are either directly or in-
directly generated by defense ex-
penditures, verifying his first
study.

he said. "They don't want the
other point of view expressed."
An appeal to baser emotions is
an easy thing to do, Martin be-
lieves.
"It's a typical demogogical ap-
proach which you get in politics
in certain periods of our history,"
he said. "You have to fight it, and
if you don't fight it, it takes over."
Similar Campaign
Martin said Romney wants to
conduct a campaign along the
lines he believes are right-and
expects the national campaign to
be conducted along similar lines.
"But I don't think we're goingj
to accept the business of high
level from the candidate and a
low level from all these people
down the line who are part of the
organization.
"We're not going to be a party
to something like that."
"I don't suspect Goldwater of
any double motives on this, but
I do know a lot of other people
who would be glad to see that
kind of thing developed and pro-
moted."

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Sumner, Program Assistant,
Office of Religious Affairs
discusses
"THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE:
A CLUE TO IDENTITY CRISES'
12:00 Noon, Michigan Union, Anderson Room
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME
(Lucheon for first 25 persons: 50c
for barbecused hamburger on bun, fruit,
milk or coffee)
Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs

TODAY

Read and Use Daily Classified A

U of M Young Republicans

present

GEORGE LEMBLE

speaking on:

CON SERVATISM-1964

1,

8:00 P.m,

Room -B, Union

DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETiN
,~*~~~~ ~~** " '~""~~~ ~
Thywlfei helwrlbyo

Tuesday, July 21-TONIGHT

The Daily Official Bulletin is an West Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.,
official publication of the Univer- 3 p.m.
ulty of : Michigan for Which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial Colloquium in Public Address: Ora-
responsibility. Notices should be sent tory in Ancient Litreature." Program
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room planned by Herbert W. Hildebrandt, De-
3564 Administration Building before partment of Speech, East Conference
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica- Room, Rackham Bldg., 3 p.m.
tion, and by 2 p.m. Fliday for Satur- Social Hour: West Conference Room,
day and Sunday. Rackham Bldg., 4 p.m.
TUESDAY, JULY 21 Doctoral Examination for Martha Ma-
lik verda, Education; thesis: "A Com-
parison of Certain Characteristics of Un-
dergraduate Women at Eastern Michi-
gan University Who Remain in' or
cal Education Curriculum," Mon., July
Noon Luncheon Book Discussions - 27, 3206 UHS, at 9 a.m. Chairman, S. C.
Elizabeth H. Sumner, program assistant, Hulslander.
Office of Religious Affairs, "The Fem-
inine Mystique: A Clue to Identity Doctoral Examination for Stephen
Crises": Anderson Room, Michigan Un- Paul Maran, Astronomy; thesis: "Photo-
ion, 12 m. electric Spectrophotometry of Nova Her-
culis 1963," Tues., July 21, 807 Physics-
Audio-Visual Education Center Film Astronomy Bldg., at 9 a.m. Chairman,
Preview--"Renaissance: It's Beginnings D. B. McLaughlin:
in Italy' and t'Michelangelo: The IMe-
dci Chapel": Multipurpose Room, Un- Doctoral Examination for Robert Ber-
dergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m. nard Oswald, Jr., Nuclear Engineering;
N thesis: "Thermal 'Neutron Induced Re-
Dept. of Linguistics Forum Lecture- coil Defects in Cadmium Sulfide," Tues.,
Pavle Ivic, University -of Novi Sad, Yu- July 21, Conference Room, Auto. Lab.,
goslavla, "Types of Linguistic Differen- at 2 p.m. Chairman, C. Kikuchi.L
tiation: Geographic'and Historical Back-
ground": Rackham Amphitheatre, 7:30 Doctoral Examination for Alvin Wil-
lard Ollenburger, Education; thesis:
F_____"The Design and Operation of a Stu-
School of Music Degree Recital -- dent Teacher Information Storage and
Suzanne Thorin, mezzo-soprano: Rec- Retrieval System," Tues., July 21, 42000
tal Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m. UHS, at 4 p.m. Co-Chairmen, M. C.
Johnson and W. C. Morse.
Colloquium in Radio and Television:
"New Forms in the Documentary Film," Gen ra NoticeS
Merrill McOlatchey, producer, WUOM,

sic, and Undergrad Public Health: Ten.
tative lists of seniors for August gradua-
tion have been posted on the bulletin
board in the first floor lobby, Admin.
Bldg. Any changes therefrom should
be requested of the Recorder at Of-
fice of Registration and Records, win-
dow Number A, 1513 Admin. Bldg.
A Breakfast honoring candidates for
the master's degree will be held at the
Michigan Union on Sun., Aug. 2, at
9 a.m. Candidates may pick up their
tickets in Room 3510 Administration
Bldg. between the hours 8-12 and 12:30-
5' Monday through Friday, or 8-12:30
on Sat., Aug. 1.

considered in spring because they would
be in summer sch. are now eligible
(orig. they planned trng. classes only
in June & July). BS, MS or PhD. Math,
Physics, Engrg. students or anyone who
has had math through differential
equations is eligible. Trng. will be in
1401, 1410, 701 and 790. Trng. for Space
Sys., Command Sys., & Intelligence Sys.
U.S. citizenship. Please call Bureau of
Appointments, Ext. 3544, if interested.
An interviewer will visit the campus
if enough students apply.
Dept. of the Navy-Officers from the
U.S. Navy Recruiting Station will be on
the campus Tues., July 21-Fri., July 24.

They will be in the lower lobby of
the Mich. Union. They will answer any
questions about the various naval pro-
grams. Anyone interested is invited to
stop by and see them.
POSITION OPENING:
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio-Seeking Industrial Engnrs. with
up to 10 yrs. Indust. exper. Will con-
sider BSIE BSME-IE, BSIE-MBA, MSIE
or MSIE-MBA. Initial trng. in central
Indust. Engrg. Dept. then assignment to
corporate IE staff or other domestic
mfg. plants. Must be willing to relo-
cate.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, Department of Speech
PLAN NOW TO SEE
The Final Two Summer Play billProductions

I'

Opera Dep
School of
Music

U

Placement

TOMORROW

at HI LLEL

l

II..

ANNOUNCEMENT.
IBM, Federal Systems Div.-A new
ng. class will be started in Bethesda
in mid-Sept. Students who were not
Authorized
TRIUMPH Dealer
Sales, Service & Parts

at 7.30 p.m.

JERRY M. B ILIK, Instructor in
Music Theory at U/M
speaks on
"MUSIC AND MADISON AVENUE"

/9

Wed.-Sat,, July 29-Aug. 1

All Are Welcome

H ERB ESTES
AUTOMART
319 W. Huron
665-3688

I

1429 Hill St.
Shows at 1 :00
2:35-4:40-6:50

Wed.-Sat., August 5-8

I

t

ALL PERFORMANCES 8:OO P.M.-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

Dial
662-6264

Box Office open
daily 12:30-5

Limited Seating
Still Available

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baptist Student Union, Social: Food,
recreation, singing, Thurs., July 23, 6:30
p.m., 2670 Jackson Road, for transpor-
tation call Bob McDaniel at 3-0018.
ENDING WEDNESDAY

Seniors: College of L.S. & A. and
Schools of Business Admin., Educ., Mu-

I

I

i

1*111 ' i

7le VIRGININ

I

RESTAURANT
State St. on Campus:

Phone NO 3-3441

serving complete luncheons daily
from 95c up

WE FEATURE:

".

DIAL 668-6416
DAILY AT 1:00-4:30-8:00

" tasty club sandwiches
* fresh fruit salads,
! crisp garden salads
* delicious desserts,

III

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THE N.1 -
ATTRACTION OF ALL TIME
mL ruur
color by DeLuxe
Mats. $1.00; Evenings $1.25

including sundaes, cream chees cake,
chilled canteloupe, watermelon
Summer Hours: 7 A.M. to 8 P.M. Daily
Closed Sundays

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lb 'X
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I

Pianist

Shows at
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00 and 9:00

WQa.

DIAL
665-6290

~4"3
I.Q

o 9 ~IN EOLQ

Winner, Van Cliburn
International
Competitions, 1962
WED., JULY 29, 8:30
Rackham Auditorium
(air-conditioned)

Inter-
denominational
Morning
Meditation

WILL YOU SPEND FIVE MINUTES IN OUR
FITTING ROOM FOR A BETTER FIGURE
FOR LIFE?

PROGRAM:

Four Sonatas-D, E, B-flat and D major ..........D. Scarlatti
Sonata in A minor, op.-164......................Schubert
CZ. M. n n 1 $- . _ Brhm

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