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January 18, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-18

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Saturday, January 1$,1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Saturday, January 18, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HAIRCUT
Michigan Union
Barbershop

HAIRCUT
Michigan Union
Barbershop
I -.

II

NTERIOR INNOVATOR?
Alaska 's controversial governor
under fire in Senate hearings

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5TATE
info: 662-6264

HELD OVER
5th WEEK..

There
bad cops
andthn
are food
cops--and1
then
there's

Associated Press News Analysis
JUNEAU, Alaska UP) - If
Walter J. Hickel's two years as
governor of the largest and
most undeveloped state in the na-
tion are any indication, he could
be an innovator and an activist
as head of the Department of
the Interior,
Already, the plain-spoken
Alaskan's few public statements
concerning his new position
have made him the most con-
troversial of President-elect Nix-
on's cabinet appointees.
Controversy is no stranger to
Bickel, who as Alaska's gover-
nor, has frequently opposed poli-
cies of Interior Secretary Stew-
art L. Udall.
Characteristically, he has said
he looked forward to the sharp
questioning he faces at the hear-
ings of the Senate Interior Com-
mittee.

"I think I'll enjoy it as much
as they will," he said.
His widely-publicized state-
ment that he is against "con-
servation f o r conservation's
sake" follows his belief that
Alaska's development has been
hampered by unrealistic federal
restrictions.
At the interior committee
hearings he was likely to air
his views thatAlaska's situation
is unique; that different policies
may well be in order for other
parts of the country.
A case in point would be the
federal water standards devel-
oped by the Interior Depart-
ment untler Udall that would
have required streams that have
never been used for industrial
purposes to be maintained at
exactly the same standard of
purity.
These standards would make
expansion of the pulp industry
in heavily forested southeastern
Alaska impossible, Hickel said
last year when pressed by the
Interior Department for adop-
tion of the controls.
The state has continued to
hold out for what officials be-

lieve would be a more reason-
able standard.
On the other hand, Hickel has
been firm in his enforcement of
pollution control standards in
the state's offshore waters.
Getting the multi-billion bar-
rel oil field in A r c t i c Alaska
into production has been one of
Hickel's prime goals.
He order:d the attorney-gen-
eral last month to file suit
against the Interior Department
to block establishment of free
trade sub zones in Maine, Geor-
gia and Hawaii.
The increase of foreign crude
oil through the zones would cur-
tail domestic oil exploration and
production, especially in high-
cost development areas like
Alaska, he said.
Although Hickel opposed an
increase in the state oil sever-
ance tax last year, he is not an
unalloyed petroleum industry
apologist as he has been por-
trayed in some quarters.
Because the great majority of
Alaska's oil provinces are pub-
lic, domain, he was considering
as governor imposition of re-
quirements in lease agreements

I

: .
1
I.

that the oil be refined in t h e-
state.
He laid groundwork for possi-
ble construction by the state of
a refinery for production of
finished petroleum products
from the state's 121 per cent
petroleum royalty.
As secretary of the interior,
Hickel will be able to lift the
"freeze" imposed by Udall on
selection by Alaska of the 103
million acres to which it was
entitled by the Statehood Act.
He has declared he will do
just that.
"We will have to convince the
natives that their interests will
be protected," he said in a re-
cent televisibn interview.
The freeze was imposed to
protectthe natives' aboriginal
rights until a federal settlement
is made with them by Congress.
Hickel has indicated he has
far-reaching plans to overhaul
the Interior Department, which
he contends has become a sort
of "catch-all" agency through
the years.
Among Hickel's plans is se-
paration of the Bureau of In-
Sdian Affairs from the interior
department in the interest of
administrative efficiency, since
it is the only branch that is not
concerned with natural resourc-
es.
The Department of Health,
Education and Welfare would
be a more logical place for it,
Hickel said.
He also espouses establish-
ment of a cabinet-level depart-
ment of fisheries and a national
agency forraising the United
States from its position as fifth
in the world in fisheries pro-
duction.
Hickel has favored p u b l i c
power projects for Alaska, in-
cluding the proposed $1.2 bil-
lion Rampart Canyon project
that was ruled out by the In-
terior Department in 1967 af-
ter years of intensive study.

STEVI VICCEJN
AS TBUJIJT"
uSEmaS EomAUNE AORC TECHNICOLOR*FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS 40IN
SHOWS AT : 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:15

IKTITAF

_- - -- - .. _ _ __ ___ _ ^ _

TONIGHT and SATURDAY

r

Mad Marvin Invites
You to Trip with him
and his friends
in a colossal

PAMELA MILES
and
DAVE JOHNS

4 s
1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.

the
news today
b The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE NATIONAL LIBERATION FRONT a n d North
Vietnam laid down a hard line yesterday on the eve of the
first session of the enlarged Paris peace talks.
An indication of the tough bargaining to come was given
by the number three man in the NLF delegation, Tran Hoa
Nam. The only possible agreement, he said, "must be based
on an end to the criminal American war of aggression" and
the total withdrawal of American troops.
On the American side of the talks Henry Cabot Lodge
told Senators in Washington he is approaching his new posi-
tion as chief U.S. negotiator with an open mind on a possible
Vietnam settlement.
After meeting with members of the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee he told newsmen "I've always said that a
military victory was not possible in Vietnam . . . I'm not a
hard liner or a soft liner. I'm a realist."
SENATE COMMITTEES gave clearance yesterday to
three more of President-elect Nixon's cabinet appointees
while marathon quizzing of Secretary of the Interior des-
ignate Gov. Walter J. Hickel continued.
The Armed Services Committee gave clearance to Rep.
Melvin Laird of Wisconsin who will become secretary of de-
fense. At the same time it approved David Packard as deputy
secretary of defense.
Also approved was David M. Kennedy as secretary of the
treasury. Questions had earlier been raised concerning Ken-
nedy's plan to place his holdings in trust, but were resolved
after Kennedy revised the trust proposal.
Hickel was asked to explain what one senator called exor-
bitant profits Hickel reportedly made in a gas distribution
firm while governor. Hickel denied he had done anything to
raise the value of the gas company stock which he had placed
in trust when he became governor.
THREE SOVIET COSMONAUTS, of the four involved
in the Thursday's space linkup and transfer came down
yesterday.
Landing in the snow covered Kazakhstan steppes, the
cosmonauts were greeted by villagers who rushed with over-
coats to protect them from the 31 degree below zero weather.
Soyuz 5, with one cosmonaut aboard, remained in orbit
PRESIDENT JOHNSON formally recommended to
Congress yesterday that it raise the pay of its members
from $30,000 to $42,500 a year.
In a special message Johnson said the present salary "by
today's standards is woefully inadequate." Johnson's message
also asked pay increases for top-level officials in the judicial
and executive branches.
The pay raises he suggested, already revealed in the State
of the Union message, will take effect automatically in 30
days unless the House or Senate changes or vetoes them.
Objection to the pay boost came from Rep. H. R. Gross
(R-Iowa) who yesterday called the measure "outrageous" and
said he would seek a roll call vote on the proposal.
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT announced yesterday
it has filed suit against International Business Machines
(IBM) corporation for anti-trust violations.
Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark said the civil suit alleged that
IBM has pursued manufacturing and marketing policies in
the general purpose digital computer field that deny other
companies the opportunity to compete effectively.
The suit alleged that IBM has discriminated among cus-
tomers and has limited development of computer program-
ming and support industries through a policy of marketing
as a package the computer system, programming know-how
and related support.
The suit against IBM, which had record net earnings in
1968 of $871 million, was reported to be the largest monopoly
case during the Johnson administration.
* . .
DIST. ATTY. JIM GARRISON'S office asked yester-
day for delay in the trial of Clay L. Shaw, charged with
conspiring to assassinate President John F. Kennedy.
The request for a delay followed a demand by a federal
judge for additional evidence before he would release autopsy
photographs and x-rays. A report on the autopsy findings
Was released Thursday but Garrison's office continued to de-
mand the actual photographs. Garrison contends they will
reveal Kennedy was shot from two different directions.

laugh program
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
Vth Forum-separate admission

Returning by overwhelming popular demand
to sing blues, ballads, originals, and contem-
porary folk music. Accompanied by guitar,
recorder and harp with DAVE JOHNS play-
ing guitar and harmonica.
Next Friday and Saturday-Bob Franke
and His Band

I

I

THE COMEDY GREATS--Program 1
W. C. FIELDS-"California Bound"
MARX BROS.-"Incredible Jewel Robber y" -pantomine
LAUREL AND HARDY-'Big Business"-one of their really great 'ones with one
of the wildest comic destruction scenes ever filled. "It will drive you mad."
"THE GREAT CHASE"-Uproarious! 60 years of great movie chases. Featuring:
Douglas Fairbanks, William S. Hart, Perils of Pauline, 30 minutes of Buster
Keaton's greatest comedy epic THE GENERAL.
"HAPPY ANNIVERSARY"-Highly creative, experimental French comedy-Aca-
demy Award Oberhausen Film Festival, 1963.
PLUS-Continuing BUCK ROGERS space serial and BETTY BOOP cartoon.

1

p.- .

'9

UNIVERSITY

ZY

MUSICAL

SOCIETY

I
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I
i
E
it
I

IW

presents
Special Concert
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN

I

World Renowned Pianist
in recital

"ARTISTRY&EROTICISM"
Cue Magazine MY "Time"
"THE MOVIE HAS THE CAREFUL TEMPO OF A MINUET,
WHICH COUNTERPOINTS ITS DESPERATE EROTICISM!"
N YTimes

WED., JAN. 22,8:30
in Hill Auditorium
PROGRAM
Two Impromptus, Op. 90 .. Schubert
"Appassionata" Sonata .................Beethoven,
O Prole do Bebe (Bay-s Family) .........Villa-Lobos
Ballade in G Minor, Op. 23
Nocturne in F-sharp major, Op. 48 .......... Chopin
Scherzo in C-sharp minor, Op. 39
Tickets: $7.00-6.50-6.00-5.00-3.50-2.50
HAGUE PHILHARMONIC

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emu players seriesF
THE HOUSE
OF
BERNARDA ALBA
-a fiery drama of Spanish women
January 15-19
Quirk Auditorium
For Reservations Call 482-3453
(Weekdays, 12:45-4:30 p.m.)
All Seats Reserved at $1.75

11

"SURELY THIS IS
AMONG THE MOST
EROTIC OF MOVIES!
The movie's artistry
raises the subject
matter to the level
of personality
exploration. THE,
EXPERIENCE IS
BIZARRELY
COMPELLING 9'
Cue Magazine

"'A HIGHLY EROTIC
FILM! IT SHOULD
BECOME A CAUSE
CELEBRE WITH THE
WHATEVER-TURNS-
YOU-ON SET! Glenda
Jackson is really
tremendous!
ENGROSSING!
OFFBEAT AND
DIFFERENT!"
WINS Radio

I

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM

presents

WILLEM VAN OTTERLOO
Conductor

JERZY KOSINSKI

11

FRI., JAN. 24, 8:30

"(LEAVES NOTHING TO "SEXUAL AND INVECTIVE
THE IMAGINATION! AND PERFORMANCES OF
GOES TOO FAR! s MEMORABLE QUALITY!"
N.Y. Daily News A BIZARRE MODERN DRAMA OF A MAN AND TWO WOMEN N.Y. Post
LOCKED IN A SENSUAL GAME OF SEX.
-,.,a ae-m ~ noe e wr m um wr em o411:e En/l:C"

TODAY

IRO6RAM

2 P.M. Reading and Discussion
with Prof. Bauland.
' i i.: r nr- \f!c ' A. 1 1

1 ,' 1

A dA~~c

Svmphonische Etude. .... ..... .

A

ln rieseen

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