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January 17, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-17

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N

Page Six

THE MfCHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 17, 1969

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Cal colleges face finance battle

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BERKELEY, Calif. (CPS) -
California may be heading for a
repeat of last year's big battle over
tuition at state colleges and uni-
versities, which have traditional-
ly been "tuition-free."
The scenario is familiar. The
University of California and the
California state colleges have ask-
ed for more than Gov. Ronald
Reagan wants to give them. And
the UC Regents are already talk-
ing about turning to other sources
to make up the difference.
The university wants $341.1 mil-
lion in tax funds, an increase of
$49.9 million. The state colleges
want $285.2 million, an increase
of $60.9 million, over last year.

For the first time, higher educa-1
tion will be dipping heavily into'
tax funds for construction money.'
The November defeat of a bond
measure that would have given
the universities and colleges each
$100 million for buildings means
that higher education will be:
battling with local school districts?
for the $100 million that is ex-
pected to be available for state-
wide construction.
When the Regents approved the.
university's budget at a meeting'
in November, Reagan warned them
that their budget "cannot be ap-
proved by the state; there justr
isn't the wherewithall." Criticism
from Reagan and some of his sup-;

porters on the Board brought a
defense of the budget by the
chairman of the finance commit-
tee, who reminded Reagan that
"Last year we were able to obtain
more money when the state wasn't
able to give us all we asked for."
One Regent wondered whether!
that might mean another hike in
student fee charges, but he was
assured that a fee hike would be
viewed only as a "last resort."
But that did not set to rest visions
of last year's tuition battle.
That controversy set off a wave
of student protests and marches
to Sacramento in protest, but they'
did no good. With radical students
at Berkeley hoping to resurrect

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the campus activist tradition in
1969, however, a tuition fight
could set off even more militant
protests this year.
If Reagan decides to push again
for an increase in student charges,
either in fees or tuition, he'll
probably find the regents much
more receptive than they were
last year. Recent changes in the
Board's membership have given
Reagan much more influence
among the Regents.
The most important of these
changes is the replacement of
f o r m e r Democratic Assembly
Speaker Jesse Unruh, a strong foe
of tuition or fee increases, with
the new Republican speaker, Rob-
ert Monagen, who favors institu-
ting tuition based on a student's
ability to pay.
Whether there is a fee increase
may depend heavily on the uni-
versity's new president, Charles J.
Hitch. During the recent Cleaver
controversy Hitch demonstrated
that he has a strong infuence on
the Regents. He almost always got
his way, usually by proposing com-
promises with Reagan's conserva-
tive views. A self-described prag-
matist, his position on tuition is
not known.I
Opposition from both Unruh
and fiscally conservative Repub-
licans could make tough going
for the budget, threatening the
possibility of a free increase.
The legislature is expected to
react adversely to the wave of dis-
orders which have been sweeping
California campuses. Don Mulford,
a top Assembly Republican leader,
has predicted that there will be
no salary increases.
Although most of the legislators
have indicated that they think:
no new laws are necessary to curb
disoirders, actions against protest-
suporting faculty members seems
to have -fairly strong support.
The .Daily
S Sports Staff

The' table

This blackboard drawing by the South Vietnamese foreign minister illustrates the round unmarked
peace table for negotiators, with rectangular secretarial tables nearby.
MINNESOTA PROTEST:
Black students gain demands

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By CHARLES SILKOWITZ
Over 75 black students who held
the University of Minnesota ad-
ministration building for over 36
hours reached a compromise solu-.
tion to their demands Wednesday
following negotiations with ad-
ministration officials.
The blacks, members of the
Afro-American Action Commit-
tee, and, about 100 supporting
whites, walked out of Morrill Hall
on the 48,000-student university
one hour before President Mal-
colm Moos announced the ad-
ministration's concessions at a
news conference. The concessions
include:
-The president's support for a
program resulting in a BA degree
that would "bring a full reflection

of the experience of black people torily meet the demands by the
in America"; next day, the black students en-
-A grant of $5,260 for a con- tered Morrill Hall and occupied
ference on black Americans that the Office of Admission and Rec-
will be conducted'on campus; ords, forcing office personnel to
willpbesconuc te bar bi leave. The iblacks were later Join-
--Expansion of the board which ed 'by the white students.
determines distribution of funds
from the Martin Luther King Jr. Though about $11,000 damage
Scholarship Fund, with the pro- was done to the building, no po-
vision that black students will licemen were summoned onto the
help choose the committee mem- campus. "The reaction to the po-
bership.lice is almost always one of vio-
bership. Ilence," Moos explained.
The settlement establishes a de-
partment of comparative ethnic: No disciplinary action has yet
studies instead of the strictly Afro- been taken against the protesters.
American s t u d i e s department However, Minnesota Gov. Harold
which the blacks had requested. ueVander said last night that the
On Mndaythe lack preent-students involved should be dis-
©n Monday the blacks present- ,
ed the administration with their ciplined."
demands. "These types of incidents will
When Moos failed\ to -satisfac- not be tolerated in the future,"

HSUR
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to 3:30 p.m.

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Miss J does the party bi
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the governor added.
Moos has appointed a faculty-
student committee which will
study the protest and recommend
action to be taken against the
students.
About 200 white students con-
ducted a counterdemonstration In
front of Morrill Hall Wednesday
morning. They pelted the occupied
building w i t h snowballs and
Swaved placards at the blacks who
appeared at the windows,
4SNACKS
Michigan Union
M. U. G.

Fishbowl and
Dorm

I

SUMMER INSTITUTE IN ISRAEL

JUNE-AUGUST, 1969

BILLIARDS
POCKET POOL

RETSIGER
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... to study Hebrew and/od Modern Israel at one or more of the following
universities-
THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY, JERUSALEM
BAR-ILAN UNIVERSITY, TEL AVIV
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF HAIFA
. . to tour the country with a complete program of sightseeing and enter-
tainment.
This program will last approximately eight weeks, divided into six weeks of
study and two weeks of touring. The University of Michigan will grant up to
six semester hours of credit to those admitted to the Institute, provided, of
course, that they meet the academic standards.
THE COST IS $960, and includes:
1) Round trip by jet between New York and Israel
2) Full prograf in Israel-tuition, maintenance, lectures, field trips,
tours
3 Full board (lodging, food)
Call Hillel Foundation, 663-4129, or Professor Joseph A. Reif, Department of
Linguistics, 213 Gunn Building, 764-0353

Michigan

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Union

BOWLING
1 P.M. to 12 P.M.
Michigan Union

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Jacob onxY

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HAIRCUT
Michigan Union
Barbershop

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SENATOR
STROM THURMOND
LOOKS AT THE
NIXON ADMINISTRATION

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