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January 17, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-17

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Friday, January 17, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

FrI I IIIIiday, Janary17I199IHE ICIGIIIILYPae Tre

CHIEUHOI PROGRAM:
Viet Cong defections scratch
surface of troops, cadres

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By JOHN T. WHEELER
CAN THO, Vietnam (R) - An
unprecedented surge of Viet Cong
troop defections in recent months
remains unabated in January, but
U.S. sources say a smaller per-
centage of main-force troops and
upper echelon civilian cadre are
showing up.
At the same time, there are in-
dications of disorganization
among the Viet Cong, particularly
in the Mekong Delta. The failure
to gather in more of the main-
force troops and top civilian of-
ficers would indicate that Saigon's
Chieu Hoi - Open Arms - cam-
paign has yet to penetrate the
ideological shield of the hard-core
Viet Cong,
In the final three months of last
year, 7,798 of the enemy surrend-
ered. This was a record, and
more than double the number of
defections logged during 1967's
final quarter.
The U. S. Command is elated by

the Aumber of enemy defections,
Senior officers advising on the
program like to point out that
the cost for each Chieu Hoi is
running about $500, or about the
price of two 105-MM artillery
shells.
Here is the Mekong Delta, where
two-thirds of the total number of
defectors were counted in the De-
cember total, more than 800 Viet
Cong turned themselves in during
the first complete week of Jan-
uary. This was more than defect-
ed in all the three other military
regions outside the delta in De-
cember.
In some areas Viet Cong sen-
ior leaders left several weeks to
months ago and lower-level in-
surgents floundered in the ab-
sence of the hard-nosed leader-
ship the senior men had exerted.
Other leaders find their orders
are disobeyed. Intelligence indi-
cations are that some Viet Cong
battalion commanders in the Delta

have simply lost control of their
Iunits.
A new program has begun un-
der which anyone talking a Viet
Cong into surrendering is paid for
his trouble. Many wives of Viet
Cong avail themselves of t h i s
collect-on-delivery program to get
their husbands into government
lines with a family nestegg to
boot. One adviser said the induce-
ment program brought in 60 per
cent of the defectors in some areas
during the final months of 1968.
The effect of defection on ene-
my strength in the delta, by U.S.
intelligence reckoning, has n o t
been too serious.
One thing certain is that the
Viet Cong are attempting to in-
filtrate the Chieu Hoi program.
That they are concerned about de-
fections and the weapons, the
Schieu Hois turn in for more pay
is reflected in a policy of locking
up Viet Cong weapons until t h e
time comes for an operation.
ment troops have been able to re-
occupy villages without any sign-
ificant opposition because no one
was around with the authority to
issue weapons to the guerrillas
who were supposed to defend
them.-

SECOND FILM IN
AN INTERNATIONAL
Man Against Society"
FILM FESTIVAL'
VISCONTI'S ITALIAN CLASSIC
WINNER VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
LA TERRA TREMA
(The Earth Will Tremble)
uncut
Friday, Jan. 17

-Associated Press
Soviet spacemen in training
Soviet cosmonauts, Alexi Yeliseyev, Vladimir Shatalov and Vevgeny Khrunov, left to right, shown
in the cabin of a spacecraft during training on earth. Yesterday in space Yeliseyev and Khrunov
transferred from their space ship, Soyuz 5 to join Shatalov in Soyuz 4.
RECLASSIFICATION SLOW:
Draft regulations may peril
Ph.D. supplies for 19 70s'

HAIRCUT
Michigan Union
Barbershop

i

BIL LIARDS

N EWMAN
331 Thompson

POCKET POOL
Michigan Union.

WASHINGTON (CPS) - Un- cent of those who are employed'
less changes are made in the pres- to do research in the sciences.
ent draft regulations as they af- Many universities told the Com-
fect graduate students, the na- mission they will not be able to
tion's supply of trained Ph.D.s/ in find enough students to teach
the sciences will be "seriously cur- courses during the next year, and
tailed" in the 1970's. that research projects may have
That is the conclusion of a sur- to be curtailed, reduced or delayed
vey of the draft's affect on male if no changes in graduate defer-
students now in their first or sec- ment are made this year.
ond year of graduate school in The present policy of drafting
the sciences, released this week by oldest eligible men first means
the Scientific Manpower Com- that first- and second-year grad-
mission, an independent Washing- uate students, most recently re-
ton research firm. classified since last spring's policy
According to data furnished by change, are first priority to fill
1,237 Ph.D granting science de- draft calls, which are expected
partments in institutions through- to stay at the 30,000-plus level
out the U.S., as many as 46 per through the coming summer.
cent first- and second-year male The survey was limited to sci-I
graduate students are potentially ence departments because the or-I
liable to induction in the next few ganizations which sponsor the
months. Commission are scientific acade-
That's 50 per cent of all grad- mic groups. It believes, however,'
uate students who are also em- that results of this first survey
ployed by universities to teach un- are roughly applicable to general
dergraduate classes, and 47 per graduate school enrollment.

75c

8 P.M.

'1

1

""""""""

* SEE
DOCWATSON
performing now at
TON ITE
and Free Goodies sexy waitresses
Sat. and Sun.
Admission: $2.00 at the door ($1.75 after 2nd set)

The Commission also speculate
about the reasons for the failur
of all 1968's projected enrollmen
drop to materialize. The slownes
of the reclassification process,i
said, combined with the summe
setback in physical examination
was a major reason.
Another was that many student
returned to or started graduat
school although in imminen
danger of reclassification, becaus
"they just wanted to get as fa
as they could," or because the
had federal scholarships or grant
which required that they enro
immediately. Those scholarship
would then be waiting for thei
after they came out of militar
service, if they were drafted.
Of the more than 4,000 mal
graduate students who were re
ported to have been accepted to
department and then failed t
enroll, however, about one-fourt
were known to have either bee
drafted or to have voluntarily en
tered military service.
Many students, of course, whe
faced with imminent draftin
have chosen to join a service othe
than the Army, hoping to avoi
duty in Vietnam.
Will the bad predictions of th
Commission come true this spring
"There is no way," the surve
report states, "to predictraccu
rately how many of the first an
second year graduate students wh
are liable to induction will b
called to service before summer.
"But inductions are likely to b
highest among this group, sinc
current regulations require that
draft board fill its quota from th
oldest available men. Few nor
college men are availablein"th
age group 22-25, where mostc
these students fall."
According to the Commissiox
the importance of this is nc
how many students are lost durin
the 1968-69 school year itself, c
during any given semester, bi
the final toll on students and un
versities in the next five-yea
period.

the
n ews today
by Th.e Associated Press and College Press Service
SOVIET COSMONAUTS successfully completed the
first linkup of two manned spacecraft yesterday and the
first transfer of men from one to the other.
After the space ships Soyuz 4 and Soyuz 5 had performed
their docking and transfer maneuvers, they separated and
continued in orbit. They were together 4 hours and 35 min-
utes.
Both Russian and Western observers hailed the feat as
a great step forward in the Soviet attempt to create an earth
orbiting space station, but U.S. experts claimed the Soviet
Union still has a long gap to close to beat the Americans to a
moon landing.
United States plans call for a moon landing in mid-July
while Western experts say the Russian attempt could not take
place before 1970.
*" .W .
THE SENATE refused yesterday, 53 to 45, to sustain
a precedent-shattering ruling by Vice President Hubert
H. Humphrey that a simple majority could cut off debate
in the opening-session battle over the anti-filibuster rule.
Humphrey's ruling followed a 51 to 47 vote in favor of in-
voking cloture to halt a filibuster against a change in rules
to make it easier to stop filibusters. This majority vote fell
short of the two-thirds margin required to cut off debate.
Humphrey ruled, however, that under the Constitution
a majority had the right at the start of a new Congress to
end debate on a proposed amendment of the rules of proce-
dure.
ANTI-WAR GROUPS late yesterday won government
sanction for a protest march along Pennsylvania Avenue
re a day before President-elect Nixon's inaugural parade
t there Monday.
ss A spokesman for the National Mobilization Committee
er against the War in Vietnam announced permits would be
r granted today approving a parade to within half a mile of
the Capitol.
NMC leaders have promised nonviolent demonstrations,
e but Harry Van Cleve of the U.S General Services Adminis-
t tration, who negotiated with the leaders, said he warned them
e "your organization has never been fully able to control the
ir people it attracts to these rallies."
'y.
tsl
11' SENATE COMMITTEES continued their review of
s President-elect Nixon's cabinet selections yesterday, ex-
m pressing approval of five and giving cold scrutiny to a
ry.
sixth.
le ' Given tacit approval were John A. Volpe as secretary of
- transportation, Maurice .H. Stans as secretary of commerce,
a John N. Mitchell as attorney general and George Romney as
o secretary of housing and urban development.
n t Questioning of Gov. Walter Hickel of Alaska continued
intothe second day before the Interior Committee. Hickel,
selected to head the interior department by Nixon, admitted
n he had given erroneous information Wednesday. But he as-
, serted no harm had been done.
r"
id
SEN. ALBERT GORE (D-Tenn.), said yesterday a
ie stock trust plan submitted by David M. Kennedy, Secre-
? tary of the Treasury designate, involves "a clear-cut con-
y flict of interest."
In a letter to Chairman Russell B. Long of the Senate
l Finance Committee, which heard Kennedy's testimony earlier
e in the week, Gore called for closed sessions of the committee
to examine further Kennedy's plans to place his stock in a
e trust fund. The trust is to be administered by the Continental
e Illinois Bank.
a Gore charged provisions of the trust "are superficial."
e He said it left to Continental, as trustee, decisions on pay-
e ments of dividends and withdrawal of profits. The trust plan
of will not sever Kennedy's connection with the bank which
Gore insists he must do before being approved by the Senate.
n, i " .
zg A TIME BOMB was discovered yesterday near the
r main floor entrance to the San Francisco State College
ut administration building.

MARK'S COFFEE HOUSE
605 E. William 769-1593
EXPERIMENTAL FILMS
from Toronto, Ontario
Thursday thru Saturday, Jan. 16-Jan. 18
Two Shows Nightly
8.and 10:00 P.M.
downstairs

I

MUSKET
A.A. CIVIC THEATER
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY

o 6
Info: 662-6264

HELD OVER

5th WEEK..

0

announce limited openings in

U. THEATER ORCHESTRA

I

"Camelot"

"South Pacific"

"lolanthe"

for information and audition appointments,
phone: 663-9821 or 971-1484, noon to 6 p.m. Jan. 13-20'

NOW! _____
Dial 5-6290

I

bead cops a
and there
are good
cops--and:
then
there's
STEVE IVCCUEEN
AS IULLITI'
Sh I66ESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES ECHNICOLOREfROMWRNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS
SHOWS AT: 1:00-3;00-5:00-7:00 & 9:15

I 1

SNACKS

Michigan
M. U.

Union
G.

i-
ar

The bomb was disconnected by an Army demolition squad
and removed for investigation. The bomb had been placed in
the building in which Acting President S. I. Hayakawa has,
his office. Hayakawa was in Sacramento when the bomb was
discovered.
The San Francisco State campus otherwise was quiet ex-
cept for a smoke bomb which caused a small fire in another
building. Striking teachers and students continued to picket,
but in reduced numbers.

SHOWS AT
11 3, 5, 7, 9 f.M.

BOWLING
1 P.M. to12 P.M.

f
r
pig
Z".. r..

emu players series-
THE HOUSE
OF
BERNARDA ALBA
-a fiery drama of Spanish women
January 15-19
Quirk Auditorium
For Reservations Call 482-3453
(Weekdays, 12:45-4:30 p.m.)
All Seats Reserved at $1.75

I

Michigan Union

11

Mr

I

I

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONS
SCHOLARSHIPS
For One Year of Study at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem
* Grants Up to $2,000
* Open to Any American

.:

I T' CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

presents
Aretha Franklin

J
w

Rm ammmem

III

auma i~~~aualu',rriputhinfa r A I AE ~ EE

II

I

IfLIE IAn V os m

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