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January 16, 1969 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-16

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 16, 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 16, 1969

RETSIGER
HSUR
RETSIGER
HSVR
RETSIGER
HSUR
RET5EIGER
HSUR
RETSIGER
HSUR
HASUR
9:30 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m.-
Pilshbowl and
Dorm

RETSIGER
HSUR
RETSIGER
HSUR
RETSIGER
HSUR
RETSIGER
HSDR

Davidson tops Wake Forest
on clutch free throw shots

CHARLOTTE UP) - Davidson's
Wildcats, ranked number four in
the nation, used deadly free throw
shooting to scape from Wake For-
est's talented sophomores with a
90-82 victory last night.
The Deacons outshot Davidson
from the field, hitting on three
more baskets for the game, but
the officials sent the Wildcats to
the charity stripe enough times
to allow them to hit for 14 more
free throws and thus give them
the game.
Davidson, a team almost un-
beatable at home, had their hands
full with Wake Forest despite the
friendly confines of the Charlotte
Coliseum. The Wildcats left the
court at halftime with only a two
point advantage, 43-41, after the
lead had seesawed throughout.
Mike Maloy, the Wildcat center,
began to work on McGregor and
finished the contest with 27'
points in addition to getting the

big man out. Forward Jerry Kroll
also benefited from the heavy
fouling to rack up 23 as he joined
Maloy in leading the Davidson at-
tack.
McGregor finally left the con-
test with a little over three min-
utes to play and Wake Forest
trailing 79-72. The Deacon press
was able to bring the count down
to 80-76 at one point but Davidson
then used the free throw line, with
Kroll being particularly effective,
to nail down their victory.
The great fouling cost Wake
Forest dearly as 6-8 Dan Ackley,
6-7 Larry Habegger and 6-3 Nor-
wood Todmann also were forced
to leave the game beause of ex-
cessive personals. Their loss de-
stroyed the Deacons on the boards
as no one could stop Maloy. The
only really effective Deacon was
soph guard Charlie Davis who hit
for 24 points.

I

Big Ten Standings

I

-Associated Press
BARBARA JO RUBIN would have become the first girl jockey in thoroughbred racing history
yesterday, but she withdrew from the fourth race at Tropical Park, Miami following a threatened
boycott by male jockeyss She is shown being kissed by male jockeys, Heriberto Arroyo, and Craig
Perret, in front of her trailer-dressing room at Tropical Park in Miami yesterday.
Male jocks boycott Rabin rtie;
Fornonamed new~s Navy coach

Big Ten All Games

Purdue
Ohio St.
MICH.
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Mich. St.
Northw't'n
Indiana
Wisconsin

W
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1

L
0a
0a
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
6

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.667
.333
.333
.333
.250
.250

W
9
8
8
11
8
7
5
9
5
6

L
3
2
4
1
4
6
6
3
8
7

Pe
.75
.80
.66
.91
.66
.53
.45
.75
.38
.46

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
LastsNight's Results
Washington & Lee 70, Navy 69
Temple 53, Pittsburgh 30
Virginia Military 87, West Virginia 84
Penn state 82, Carnegie-Mellon 55
Notre Dame 84, Detroit 77
Delaware 65, Lafayette 60
Penn 32, Villanova 30
Harvard 63, Dartmouth 60
William and Mary 77, George Wash-
ington 75
Auburn 78, Alabama 63
Dayton 69, Louisville 67

Ct.
50
i00
i67
117
i67
39
54
50
R85
661
14

MIKE MALLOY

MIAMI - Some 100 male jock-
eys threatened a mass boycott at
Tropical Park yesterday and
blocked the efforts of Barbara Jo
Rubin to become the first girl
rider in U.S. thoroughbred racing
history.
After a stormy meeting in the
jockey quarters, they refused to
come out for the third race unless
the 19-year-old brunet was taken
off her scheduled mount, Stone-
land, in the fourth.
Trainer Brian Webb, who put
Miss Rubin on Stoneland, finally
agreed under pressure to withdraw
her, "so that racing can continue
at the track."
Miss Rubin, who had donned
her racing silks in a trailer adja-
cent to the regular jockey quarters
was shaken and on the verge of
tears when she made a brief ap-
pearance at the door.
"This was totally unexpected"
the tiny girl said, "all I wanted
was a chance. I will try again."
Her attorney said no legal ac-
tion was planned "unless there is
no other way" for Miss Rubin to
break through the sex barrier in
racing.x

"The racing commission lived up
to its promises," Burns said. "The
jockeys did not."
Riders scheduled to race against
Miss Rubin agreed several hours
before the race that they would
ride. However, later in the day
they rebelled.

i
.:,::-:
: i
..
:' {

ing Roger Stauback, the 1963 Heis-
man trophy winner, to Annapolis.
Forzano, who never played a
minute of college football, re-
places Bill Elias as head football
coach. Elias 'was dropped Dec. 11.
Elias' 1968 team lost eight of 10
games and bowed to Army 21-14.

* M*An assistant coach at Navy from
ANNAPOLIS. Md. - Rick For- 1959 to 1964 w h e n he became
zanon, offensive backfield coach coach at the University of Con-
for the Cincinnati Bengals of the necticut, Forzano never played at
American Football League this Kent State University from which
AericnwaanpFotballdLeaguebthihe was graduated. He had a brok-
season, was appointed football en ankle, but he became a back-
coach at Navy today. field coach there and went on in-
Capt. J. O. Coppedge, athletic to a coaching career.
director at the U.S. Naval acade- t c h ar
my, said the 40-year-old Forzano
would have a three-year contract, BOOMINGTON, Id.-Mark
woud h ve thee yea co tra t, Spitz 18-year-old Santa Clara,
but would not disclose the terms. Calif., schoolboy who won four
Forzano, an assistant coach at medals in the 1968 Olympic Games
Navy from 1959, through 1964, re-sm ing copetitionympillaee
places Bill Elias, fired Dec. 11 after swimming competition, will enter
the Middies lost eight of 10 games, Indiana Unversity later this
including the all-important Army nuonth.
game. Spitz holds three world and two
"Our records reflect that he's American records in the butterfly
been one of our most effective stroke.
athletic recruiters in the past 15 He swam on the 1968 U.S. Olym-
years," a spokesman said. During pic championship 400 and 800-
his previous stint at the Academy, meter freestyle relay teams, won a
Forzano was credited with bring- silver medal in the 100-meter but-
terfly and a bronze medal in the
100-meter freestyle.

Against
IC
Legend of the
Hotdogging Hone ybear
By BILL CUSUMANO
He flys through the air with the greatest of ease . . . That's
the way the song went about the man on the trapeze, but now
the words apply to the jumping wonder of the National Basket-
ball Association, Gus Johnson.
Those who saw the NBA All-Star game on Tuesday were treated
to the brilliance of Oscar Robertson, Earl Monroe and other stars,
but the one play that stood out was Johnson's standing two hand
cram. And that is the way Gus Johnson is; he gives the fans more
for their money than anyone else in the league.
Johnson is the epitome of spring. He is one of the few men who
have earned the adjective of being a "leaper". This great jumping
ability plus great body control and brute strength make hi one
of the finest physical specimens in the NBA and one of its greatest
players.
But many men in the pros possess excellent physical attributes
and still are not exciting. Johnson's uniqueness comes from the flair
with which he plays the game. The Honeybear, as his teammates
call him, moves about the court with a controlled abandon. He has a
certain class of his own, he is an athlete with elan.
Johnson's forte is the dunk shot. He takes off from the foul
line and rams the ball home in any one of innumerable ways.
There really is no way that Johnson cannot dunk, whether it be
one-handed, two-handed, over the head, with pumps or even
hooking. Gus even stunned former NBA great Bob Cousy one
night when he hooked a dunk shot. The ex-Celtic guard had never
seen it done before.
The feats of the Baltimore Bullet star are even more amazing
when it is remembered that he is only 6-6. He is not one of the giants
like Wilt Chamberlin. But Johnson makes up for his relative lack
of height by using his two legs.
A sportswriter once asked Johnson how high he could jump
and didn't believe it when the Honeybear replied that he could touch
the top of a backboard. Gus' only answer was to have a 20 dollar
bill placed on top of the backboard and he then proceeded to take it
off.
Gus probably wouldn't have proven that he could touch the board
unless the money was there. Johnson continually flirts with indebted-
ness because of his love for clothes and cars. He has one of the most
extensive wardrobes in the NBA and also one of the longest list of
bills.
He has to be a sharp dresser, though, just to keep up with the
rest of his image. For Gus is undeniably cocky, he is a hot dog. He
feels that there is no better all around forward in the NBA and still
complains abdut losing the rookie of the year award to Jerry Lucas
six years ago.
Johnson's whole style of play and off court attitudes make
him an attraction. There are those who go to games to see the
gold star in his false front tooth. As Gus explains it, "What else
could I have on my tooth but a star?" And a star he is, con-
sistently averaging around 20 points and14 rebounds per game.
Despite his talents on the court, though, Johnson's greatest
moments come in warm-ups. It is there that he flashes his dunking
abilities without inhibition. True fans always come to Bullets games
early to see Gus do his thing. He usually gets the biggest cheers for
cramming after he. has taken off from the foul line and then trans-
ferred the ball behind his back to his opposite hand. Sometimes,
just for effect, he will also catch the ball with his other hand as
it slams through the net.
Johnson seems to follow the pattern of his dunks in natural life;
he never does anything the way others do. A native of Akron, Ohio,
he played. on the same high school team as Nate Thurmond, 6-11
center of the San Francisco Warriors. But despite the presence of
Thurmond Gus jumped center. "Who else?" says the indomitable
Johnson.I
After a high school career in which he displayed considerably
less talent with books than basketballs, Gus turned up at the Univer-
sity of Idaho. Once again he excelled on the hardwoods but still
found hardbacks too great an obstacle. Only the Baltimore Bullets
have saved him from being a playground bum.
But even while playing with Baltimore Johnson has shown
no inclination to settle down. Once he was late for a game and
claimed that he had been help up by a parade. The only trouble
was that there were no parades in Baltimore that day. Gus then
decided that it just must have been a mass of his many fans.
Such behavior must be expected of a man who dares to block
Wilt Chamberlin's dunk shot, though. Johnson got a broken wrist
for his troubles one night attempting that trick but laughed it off,
preferring to remember the moment two nights before when he had
stuffed the mighty Dipper.
Johnson also has total disregard for his body. He plays con-
tinually with a bad nerve in his back but persists in recklessly leaping
over several layers to snare a rebound. Usually he gives out a war
whoop when he does it, just to add insult to injury.
He is flambuoyant, irresponsible and incorrigible. But nothing
more could be expected from a man who's motto is, "Sometimes
I even amaze myself."

i

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1109 S. University-Campus Village

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p I.'

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