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January 16, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

x THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thur
rs

day, January 16, 1

I

'City Course' offers

FIRST IN THE NATION:

educational diversity Architecture school proposes

CAMPUS ISSUES LUNCHEON
DISCUSSION WITH
January 17
HAROLD CRUSE, Visiting Honors Lecturer, Author of Crisis of the Ne-
gro Intellectual and Rebellion or Revolution
January 24
JOHN L. CASH, Coordinator of Human Relations Programs, Office of
the President
January 31
RONALD THOMPSON Back Student Union
Discussions free and open to the public-Bring your lunch or buy your lunch here

I

By E'LIZA PATTERSON
and RICK PERLOFF
Nearly 75 students met last
night in Angell Hall to discuss
ways ofnimprovinguniversity ed-
ucation.
Much of the meeting was de-
voted to recruiting students for
the city course which was initiated
last winter. The course affords
students the opportunity to "go
out into the field and get academic
credit for it," Prof. Richard Mann
of the psychology department ex-
plained.
"There's a limit to how much a
person can learn in Ann Arbor
classrooms," he continued. "Soine-
how education has to be more
relevant to students. They must
see it from where it's at." 1
Students, working under the
guidance of a professor, can par-
ticipate in a course which might
include tutoring of black students
or observing middle class families.
Later in the meeting, Dan
Sobel, '69, described the College
Studies Program, a new student
organized department which of-
fers courses in inter-disciplinaryl
fields.E
The department, which has a
formal office at 108 Angell Hall
and already offers four courses
for credit to students, permits
students to sign up for a course of
their choosing, and procure a pro-
fessor. The students then must
present a plan to the curriculum
committee of the literary college
explaining what they would like
to learn from the course.
The department offers a course
studying the process of education
within the University and is con-
sidering one on Latin American
revolution.
The latter part of the meeting

was devoted to a panel discussion
by the participants in the city
course.
Bill Korn, '69, described his ex-
perience inworking in a federal
prison studying homosexuality. He
was interested in the sociological
structure of the communal.
Joyce Wood described her work
in Ypsilanti with four former de-
linquent black girls.
"It showed me the great need
to change the country's school
system," he said. -

iew doctorai uegree program-

By ERIKA HOFF
The University's architecture
college may soon be the first in
the country to offer a Doctor of
Architecture degree.
A new eight-year program lead-
ing to the degree will be submitted
by 'the college to t h e gradua~te
school executive board next week.
If it is approved there, it will then
go to the Board of Regents. With
approval there, the architecture

school could graduate student.s
,with a Doctor of Architecture de-
gree in two years.
Some schools offer a Ph. D. in
architecture. However, such pro-
grams encompass a broader area
than Just architecture and are of-
ten preparation for teaching.
"The Doctor of Architecture
degree will be a professional de-
gree designed as extra preparation
for careers in the field of archi-

'U, officials unlikely to assist
failing Ann Arbor bus system

f
t
S
I

By PHIL BLOCK
Ann Arbor officials will pro-
bably not find University money
available to save the city's failing
bus system which is expected to
close down at the end of this
month.
University and city officials dis-
cussed the transportation prob-
lems and other common problems
at their quarterly meeting Tues-
day night.
At the meeting city officials ar-
gued for University involvement in
the city's mass transportation sys-
tem while University leaders said
the University could only maintain
an advisory role.
The city may cancel its present
contract with the St. John Trans-
portation Co. at the end of the
month because of unexpected high
costs of the system.
At the meeting- one councilman
suggested that the University ex-
pand its own bus system and al-

low city residents to ride the bus-
es. Presently, only University stu-
dents and personnel are allowed to
use the buses.
The councilman also proposed
that the city pay 10 per cent of the
costs of the expanded system.
Other councilmen felt that al-/,
though immediate University par-I
ticipation in a municipal bus sys-
tem was unfeasible, the city and
the University should work on a
long range program which could
solve the transportation needs of
both.
University objections to the pro-
posals center around the lack of
legislative approval for University
support of community services.
Most of the University officials
at the meeting felt that the most
the University could do was to
provide technical advice on the
bus system. '
Another transportation problem
discussed by city and University
officials was theconstruction of' a
"southern penetrator" from 1-94
into the citynvia State St. The
city has already submitted a pre-
liminary plan for the project to
the state highway department
/A
f

which will cut across part of the
University golf course.
University officials announced
that an alternate plan which
would avoid cutting into recrea-
tional areas is nearing completion
and will be submitted to city of-
ficials at the next University-city
meeting in March.
Also considered was the widen-
ing of Hill St. to form an east-
west corridor through the city.
City officials felt that University
financial support for the project
was appropriate because the Uni-
versity asked for and obtained the
closings of -other east-west streets
such as North University.
Czechs pri
librlzt

tecture." says Prof. Walter Sand-
ers of t h e architecture depart-
ment.
"There are opportunities for ar-
chitects that didn't exist five or
ten years ago," Sanders says. He
explained that positions are be-
ing created that require the skills
of an architect but that also in-
volve areas not covered in t h e-
masters program. Sanders points
to fields of government such as
HEW and urban planning as ex-
amples of new challenges in the
field.
In June. 1967. a six-year pro-
gram in architecture replaced the
previous five-year program. Stu-
dents following the current pro-
gram take two years of LS&A
courses and begin studies in archi-
tecture in their third year. At the
end of six years they receive a
Master of Architecture degree.
At the end of six years they re-
ceive a Master of Architecture de-
gree. Students can, upon applica-
tion, receive a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree at the end of four
years.
Those students now working o~i
their Masters of Architecture de-
gree feel that the additional de-
gree would be valuable primarily
as an opportunity to do research.
"There is virtually no research
being done in the field today, ex-
cept what is done by students
working on their programs," says
Dale Bryant, grad.
g loA1001 d, r i v eV
In addition to agreeing to write
the letter to Colotka, the students
called for negotiations with t h e
Soviets about the sovereignity of
Czechoslovakia; abolition of press
censorship, which was reinstated
after the invasion; new elections
for the National Assembly; con-
vening of a Czech congress; re-
cognition of the workers' coun-
cils whose establishment was
halted by the invasion, and con-
tinuation of the 14th party con-
gress that was held in secret two
days after the invasion and then
invalidated on the demand of the
Soviet Union.
L
Legislat ors ask

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at your college store .1 DOUBLEDAY

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TV RETAL
$10FREE service
per month and delivery
NEJAC TV RENTALS 662-5671

PRAGUE W) - Premier Old-
rich Cernik, on the eve of a Com-
munist party Central Committee
meeting, said on a broadcast yes-
terday that last year's reforms are
not being abandoned.
But he cautioned against "spon-
taneous" actions in the Soviet-
occupied country that could lead
to crisis.
Several hours later some 1,500.
Prague students, marking the first
anniversary of January 1968 when
Alexander Dubcek ousted Anoton-
in Novotny as party chief a n d
launched the reform .wave, ap-
proved a six-point program de-
manding that the reforms be
continued.I
The liberalization drive was cut
short last August when the Sov-
iets, believing i the reforms were
getting out of %hard Communist
control, invaded the country.
In addition to the six demands
the students ,,agreed to send a
letter to Petr Colotka asking him
to stand aside in favor of Josef
Smrkovsky, president of the Na-
tional' Assembly, for the post of
chairman of the new federal as-
sembly.
A recent party decision to have
Smrkovsky accept the deputy
chairmanship was believed to have
been made at the insistence of the
Soviets, whose tanks remain not
far outside Prague.

campus probe

(Continued from Page 1)
checked into charges of commu-
nist infiltration on the Michigan
State campus in the early fifties.
The Cahalan Committee, however,
did not investigate the University. 0
The proposed special committee
would function as a select stand-
ing committee until Dec. 31,' 1970.
Sen. Raymond Dzendzel (D-De-
troit) and Sen. Joseph ;S. Mack
(D-Ironwood) were the only Dem-
ocrats to sign the resolution.

i

9.

I

I

COY

JANUARY 25 TO FEBRUARY 8

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONS
SCHOLARSHIPS
For One Year of Study at the
Hebrew University in Jerusolem
* Grants Up to $2,000
* Open to Any American
Undergraduate or
Graduate Student
" Application Must Be In
By March 31, 1969
FOR INFORMATION AND APPLICATION
CALL HILLEL FOUNDATION, 663-4129 OR WRITE
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONS: 1640 Rhode Island Ave.
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036

Break the Dorm Habit
Rush TEP
Where Our House Is Our Home
Tau Epsilon Phi
1412 CAMBRIDGE RD.
Telephone 761-3618

WAAR!IlN AFRIC
+ HUNT RIDE IN IRELAND
f CANOE THE DANUBE
+ ROAM THE ORIENT
+ EXPLORE EUROPE
o p Summer expeditions for sophisticated
CG M and energetic students who prefer an
* * adventurous, unstructured, self-directed
program. For information write to:
Mr. Robert M. Hill, Director

A

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ROBINSON CRUSOE ABROAD
338 West 84th St., New York City 10024

4

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DR. DANIEL JORDAN.
Professor of Education-Univ. of Mass.

Saturday, Jan. 18 ONLY
8:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M.
SEMI-ANNUAL STUDENT
APARTMENT FURNISHING
SALE

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"Art and Spiritual Development"

FLOOR PILLOWS-linen, corduroy,
cotton prints and solids
THROW PILLOWS-to mix or match

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