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April 12, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-12

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TONIGHT
JON
1421 Hill St
gutrSUNDELL 8:30OPM.

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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second front page

Saturday, April 12, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
Bad checks plague local stores and banks

TRADITIONAL & ORIGINAL MUSIC
SATURDAY NITE LATE-

AFTER HOURS

-50c_

I L..~, -----.- -~ ____ I

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
{ _ _ _ 6

FEATURE TIMES
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.
1:00-4:30-8:00
Monday & Tuesday
7:30 -P.M.

By MICHAEL THORYN
Each spring as finals approach,
campus merchants brace for the num-
ber of checks that come beck stamped
insufficient funds."'
Over the past year, the number of
bad checks cashed in Ann Arbor has
increased-but both city police and
the merchants attribute this to a
"criminal element" rather than a
growing population of remiss students.
However, banks and all types of
campus stores are taking additional
precautions before handling a student
written check-with some establish-
ments, especially restaurants, insisting
on cash payments.
Campus Corners, for example, uses
a Regiscope camera which photographs
each check transaction "for your pro-
tection" according to a sign.
But "it's more for our protection

than yours," admits co-owner Jim
Mitchell.
"A very low percentage of student
checks bounce," Mitchell says. "And in
most of those it's a mistake in addi-
tion." He has more trouble with pro-
fessionals.
"There's a fellow in AnnArbor now
who has worked the whole town and
gotten off so far with $600 to $800.
"The professionals," Mitchell ex-
plained, "aren't afraid of the mini-
camera. They duck their head or put
gum on the lense."
William Friedrichs, manager of
Jacobson's women's clothing store,
takes a sympathetic view of student
financial problems. "Kids just run out
of money near Christmas and the end
of the school term," he says.
"As for checks that bounce, 95 per
cent of the time they just goof with
addition. Or Dad gets paid on the first

of the month, but doesn't send his
kids money on schedule."
But Friedrichs has taken students to
court for fraud and forgery-both
felonies punishable with a maximum
(but rarely gpplied) sentence of 14
years in jail.
Crewcut detective sergeant Norman
Olmstead heads the city police depart-
ment's two-man bad check detail. Ac-
cording to Olmstead, there are three
types of bad checks-checks which
bounce because of insufficient funds,
checks forged to' an actual account,
and checks drawn on a fake account.
Writing a check with insufficient
funds-the most common problem-is
a misdemeanor entailing only a short
jail term and a small fine. "We're
not really going aftera these," says
Olmstead.
Olmstead and his assistant investi-

gated 524 bad checks last year with
an estimated total of $59,000. Sixty
per cent of these were forgeries or no
accounts. There w e r e 50 arrests in
1968, with 12 so far this year.
"I've never had contact with many
firms. They -must write the checks off°
as business losses," he says.
Two campus banks, Ann Arbor Bank
and National Bank and Trust t a k e
strict precautions against bad checks.
Carl Martinson, Marketing Director
of Ann Arbor Bank said the bank uses
a new system called comp-u-check. By
calling a Detroit phone number and
supplying a Michigan drivers license
number, a teller can learn if the cus-
tomer has ever cashed a bad check or
has a police record.
The official also espoused what
might be called the devil theory of
student bad checks. He attributed

many bounced checks to a syndicate of
professionals out of Detroit who pose
as students and a "vicious" dope rack-
et which motivates students to do any-
thing to get money to feed their habit.
The Michigan Union, which cashes a
large number of checks for students.
has been hit "pretty heavily" by bad
checks, according to General Man-
ager Frank Kuenzel - and of course
this doesn't help the Union's financial
problems.
"Most merchants won't talk about
bad checks because they don't want to
antagonize students," says Kuenzel,
"but I got three in one week recently
totalling $60.
The cashing service charges a dime
per check, closed for the term on Ap-
ril 10 to avoid student confusion and
the traditional end-of-the-term bank-
ruptcy.

CIAM38L43T

TECHNICOLOR*PANAVISIONO FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS

r"

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DIAAL
5-6290

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION yesterday announced the
closure of 59 of the nation's 113 Job Corps centers.
The closing down of the centers-most bf them in rural areas-,
will be offset somewhat by the establishment of 30 new inner-city
and near city training centers, Labor Secretary George Shultz in-1
dicated.
Shultz told a news conference that the move does not representj
"a wholesale slaughter" of the youth training program. "It is a ques-j
tion of.rearranging the mix," he said. The old centers will be phased
out by July 1 .
Shultz explained the centers were being shut down because of,
the high cost for training youths and the high dropout rate. Shultz
estimated the closure would result in a savings of $100 million.
EIGHT NATO MINISTERS yesterday decided to review all
possibilities of negotiations with the European Communist bloc.
At the same time the ministers stressed maintenance of NATO's
military deterrent power,
The NATO envoys have been conferring since Wednesday.
* * *
EGYPT has given a United Nations mediator a vague answer
on whether Israel can eventually use the Gulf of Aqaba and the
Suez Canal diplomatic courses, indicated yesterday.
The reply came in spite of Jordan King Hussein's call on Thurs-
day for guarantees for freedom of navigation through the Gulf of.
Aqaba and the Suez Canal as part of an overall peace settlement.,
He said he was speaking for Egyptian President Nasser, as well as for
himself.
However, the informants said, in reply to questions from UN
special envoy Gunnar Jarring that Egypt 'promised freedom of navi-
gation through "international waterway in the area" without speci-
fying which ones. The offer was made conditional on Israel doing,
"other things" in return.
Jarring's questions were posed privately to Egypt, Jordan and;
Israel last month and concerned their attitude toward the SecurityI
Council's resolution of Nov. 22, 1967. That resolution called for guaran-
teeing freedom of navigation through international waterways in
the area.
THE VIET CONG shelled more than 45 allied bases and
towns yesterday, destroying much of provincial capital Tay Ninh.
This may mark the opening of a new phase in the spring of-3
fensive, U.S. military analysts indicated. It was the most violent series
of rocket and mortar attacks in three weeks. The last month has been1
seen as a period of comparative lull in the enemy offensive which1
was launched Feb. 23..
About one-fourth of yesterday's attacks were aimed at South
Vietnamese provincial and district capitals.
MEANWHILE, Sen. Howard W. Cannon (D-Nevada) projects{
that the US may be able to bring around 50,000 GIs home from1
Vietnam this year. Cannon,,a member of the Senate Armed Servicest
Committee, said he believed South Vietnam is now in the position
to take over some of the fighting.-

Panther
supp rters
arrested,
NEW YORK (IP) - Hundreds of
supporters of 14 Black Panthers,
who were jailed in an alleged
bomb plot, picketed a courthouse
and marched on the Wall Street
district yesterday, resulting, in
four arrests.
Among two arrested inside the
Criminal Court Building was Ab-
ble Hoffman, Yippies leader who
was among those seized in Chi-
cago during the Democratic Na-
tional Convention.
Hoffman and another man were
grabbed by polce in a crowd of
about 200 jamming the corridor
outside a courtroom.
Inside the courtroom lawyers
were arguing whether the Panth-
ers' bail of $100,000 each should
be reduced. The 14 are accused of
plotting to set off bombs in de-
partment stores, a rail terminal
and other sites.
21 were indicted in all. Two
were in jail in New Jersey and five
were still at large.
A group of about 75 Panthers,
headedby David Brothers, New
York chairman of the Black Pan-
ther party, tried to get into t h e
courtroom but were barred when
they refused to submit to asearch.
Meanwhile, a crowd of demon-.
strators reaching a peak of about
700 picketed outside the court-
house and two persons were ar-
rested there.
Earlier about 400 of the demon-
strators, mostly young people,
marched downtown to 'Chase
Manhattan Plaza in the financial
district and held a brief rally,
A bank window was broken and
a piece of chrome stripped from
an automobile during the march.
The Michigah Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan. 420 Maynard St, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.

student bad checks. He attributed ruptcy.

-Associated Press
Deionstration in Rome
Italian students, police clash

THE ALTERNATIVE
and
MAD MARVIN
Present a

DOUBLE FEATURE
CAMP MOVIE PROGRAM
Admission only $1.00
Shareholders $.75
FEATURE NO. 1: -BUSTER CRABBE in
"MARS ATTACKS THE WORLD" (1938)
science-Fiction Melodrama. ThTis is a feature version from
the "Flash Gordon's Trip To Mars" serial. The action fol-
lows the adventures of the Earth people on M1ars with the
Clay people and the eventual overcoming of the treacher-
ous Emperor Ming. It is crammed with excitingaction in
the bizarre manner, with outlandish people and 'weird
mechanical instruments.
FEATURE NO. 2:
"MELODY RANCH" (1941)
starring GENE AUTRY, GABBY HAYES, and JIMMY DURANTE
7:30 & 10:00 P.M.-Natural Science Auditorium
FRIDAY, SATURDAY-APRIL 11, 12

ROME (P) - Clashes between j twisting back streets. No one was
police and bands of students broke reported injured.
out in Rome and Milan yesterday In Milan 2,000 persons walked
after workers across the country silently through the city to ex-
staged a three-hour strike to ex-- press sympathy with the Batti-
press solidarity with citizens of paglia workers. But about 100 pro-
Battipaglia who battled police Mao Tse-tung students broke
Wednesday and Thursday. from the procession and attacked
The riot in Battipaglia left two the headquarters of an industrial
dead and hundreds injured. It led association. Police fended them off
to yesterday's strike and disorders with clubs and tear gas. After-
and to a political crossfire be- ward, seven policemen reported
tween Communists and govern- injuries, none serious.
Several thousand students from Another group of pro-Maoists
the University of Rome paraded tossed a Molotov cocktail into the
through the/ streets and plazzas library of a government printing
from the railroad station almost house.
to the Tiber River, more than two The strike, staged during nor-
miles away. mal siesta hours, halted' buses,
The more militant of the stu- trains and some industrial work.
dents began tossing stones and Movement at Rome's Fiurnicino
bottles at police assigned to guard Airport grinded to a stop.
the demonstration. Police retali- In Battipaglia, a railroad junc-
ated with club-swinging charges, tion just south of Salerno, about
sending students scattering into 20,000 persons flocked to the fun-

eral of Teresa Ricciardi, a 26-
year-old school teacher, and Car-
pine Citro, 19, a student. Both
were victims of riots that led to
burnings of 200 autos, the city
hall, the railroad station, and to
guerrilla warfare between police
and citizens.
The town erupted into violence
Wednesday after workers at to-
bacco and sugar factories disputed
a planned employe layoff.
Bitterness lingered in the town
of 26,000. Union and town offi-
cials ordered wooden grandstands
put up from which they planned
to exhort the people to calm down.
Townsfolk tore down the make-
shift grandstands.
The Italian Communist party
blamed Interior Minister Franco
Restivo for the riots, The Com-
munists said Restivo's ministry has
done little to better the plight of
millions of poor southern Italians.

1

I

HeldOverNATONAL GENEAL COPORATION
Held Ove O ESENHETE
2nd FOH VILL 6E
Week 375 No. MAPLE RD. -7691300

Feature Times
mMon. thru Fri.
_6:30-9 :15
Saturday-Sunday
1:00-3:45-
"30-9: 1

SUNDAYSARE NOW
BONUS DAYS
from 12 Noon-5 P.M. at
discount records, s.
1235 S. University only
CHECK US FOR
IN-STORE SPECIALS

I

April 11-12
KING OF HEARTS
Alan Bates
Genevieve Bujold
"Wildly raffish, slapstick
and satire"--N.Y. Times
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, 7-9 P.M.
Aud. A. Angell 75c

I

These Nazis
aren'tfor real!
They are Allied agents
who must win
World War 11

W. J W -Z. I J

11

1

I

I

-TON ITE-
DAVE VAN HONK
will get you off!
at

:. . .:
.:
>. a~

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