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April 12, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-12

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturdav. Aaril

12_ 1969 1

PaeToTEMCIA AL

Scitirclrm, Ariril 1~ 1Qi~Q

F

Ensian
By PHIL S. STEIN meml
T h e 1 9 6 9 Michiganensian sixth
opens hopefully and encour- rollm
agingly with the great smile of vali
a nice looking girl on the cover, able!
and a picture of a spontaneous seen:
group-dance on the Diag last tutic
spring on the frontispiece. But has
by the time the reader makes it A(
through, the' organizations pic- cons
tures (You know, the standard ing
shots of Daily editors looking bega
pensive and UAC officers look- the
ing official) and the fraternity- ling
sorority section, the quality es- ily .
tablished early has all but dis- of a
appeared. mor
Interesting things, these year- fore,
books. What makes the Engin- peop
eering Council worth two full the
pages-with pictures of only O
five members-is beyond me. begi
And why over 100 pages are de- Diag
voted to a Greek system with a it th

'69:

For

the

abership of less than one-
h of the total University en-
rent seems to make the
dity of yearbooks question-
But, if you disregard this
ningly inbred glut of insti-
onal boredom, the 'Ensian
done all right.
ctually, this year's staff put
iderable effort into further-
the process of revision that
an last year. The heart of
book-that section chronic-
life at the Big U-is primar-
a relaxed photographic tour
year in Ann Arbor. It is
e event-oriented than be-
but mostly celebrates the
le in events, rather than
events themselves,
rganized as a chronology,
nning with last summer's
g Art Fair (the captions call
his; actually, the fair takes

place on South University), the
book encapsulates the year into
a 142-page picture journal. It is
ordered on chronological lines,
rather than topical standards;
thus, we first see the football
team in September, pass through
the SDS disruption of Presi-
dent Fleming's State of the
University speech, and return to
the football team at a game
played two weeks later. It snow-
ed during first semester finals
time at the UGLI; the SGC store
opened in the basketball sea-
son. The relations of time are
underscored by the order of the
pictures.
It's good to see, too, that year-
boks are more and more becom-
ing visual rather than verbal;
copy is kept to a minimum.
More should have been deleted,
though, because the 'Ensian

0
mindles
staff's writers aren't nearly the
pros the photographers are. On
page 110, the captions say Den-
nis Stewart is shooting, and
Dan Fife is making a running
jump shot; had the copywriter
looked more closely at the pic-
ture, he might have realized
that Stewart is passing, and
Fife is attempting an under-
hand lay-up. Similarly, the bold
student who raced nude down
the steps of the Union to flash
the "V" sign behind Police Chief
Krasny during the Dionysus in
69 brouhaha is identified in the
caption as "Student protester."
Very enlightening. S t a n le y
Kauffman and Arthur Rubin-
stein have their names mis-
spelled. And is Wayne Morse
really known for his studies in
interpersonal relationships?
The graphics staff has gen-
erally done well in the experi-
ments. All except the sports
pages are fine examples .of un-
cluttered layout, where enough
white space is provided to am-
ply set off each picture. Several
interesting photo reproduction
techniques are applied, and the
color shots - although still
tinted by printer's-plant blue -
brighten the book up suitably,
nicely matching the orange and
pink cover scheme.
My choices for best pictures
in the book reflect some of the
photographers' a e s t h e t i c in-
sights and journalistically inter-
pretive eyes. Andy Sacks' inspir-
ed color shot of Timothy Leary
being blessed by a mystic splat-
ter of godly hues is tops; Photo
Editor Thomas R. Copi's cover
picture shows the same insight
for a fine portrait that he dis-
plays in the picture of his boss,
Editor Sue Schultz, on page 367.
Other especially good pictures

'

s eye
are Larry Robins' "colorless col-
or" view of the NationalBallet;
Richard Lee's of writer-in-resi-
dence Je r r y Kosinski; and
Copi's aforementioned glimpse
of the nude spirit from the
Dionysus affair. Actually, t h e
only photographic pitfalls a r e
suffered when some of the more
radical reproductive techniques
make some pictures almost ill-
egible, when the color is so
washed that color is pointless.
You can have fun by pre-
tending that the whole book -
not just the 144 pages of front
section to which I devote my re-
view - represent, in any way,
life at the University. But, as
the editors of The Daily say, I
guess s t u d e n t publications
should only be representative of
the people who choose to staff
them. Which means we can cut
the crap when someone pulls a
coup and wrests control of the
book f r o m the Greek groups
which pay for those big pictures
in back. Or, which might also
mean we can grin and bear it
and realize that we aren't ask-
ing the yearbook to be relevant
- that it should be attractive is
all that matters.
U

SUNDAY
NIGHT

AVEHICLE
of Ann Arbor
-PRESENTS-

APRIL
13

THE FANTASTIC
ROTARY HCONNECTION

AN
EXPANDING
EXPERIENCE

SHOW
-including-

LIGHTS
DANCING

r

THE SOUL REMAINS
AND HEAD
(Continuous performance from 9 P.M.)
ALL TICKETS $2.75 AT THE DOOR
l --ALIVE ENTERTAINMENT--
639 S. MAIN at MQSLEY

I

poetry and prose
Wright: Touchi g a poet's love

F

p .

By LARRY RUSS
James Wright gave a poetry
reading at the UGLI yesterday.
If you missed it I feel extremely
sorry for you. He is one of those
very, very few who c write
about the deepest grip s and
joys. His sound is masterful and
his imagination is on the fron
tier.
His first book, The Green
Wall, which won the Yale
Younger Poets Award, was very
much one of those tidy little,
bloodless boxes of the 50's
(though better than most)-
rhymes like the ping of an egg-
timer on schedule, fossilized
syntax, etc. His next book.
Saint Judas, was moving away
from that type of cubicle, deal-
ing with more terrible subjects
-more natural but still bogged.
Then, after having stopped
writing in disgust with his work,
he began translating some mod-
ern poets like Trakl. An ex-
plosion followed, a miracle: The
Branch Will Not Break.
Written in beautiful free
verse, finding a natural voice,
wielding a deep and terrible
imagination, it is a wonderful
book. Sometimes Wright seeis
like a great hawk, making pow-
erful circles, swoops, gliding on
a strong wind, watching the
world with old, wise, penetrating
eyes. And sometimes he seems
like a small, furry animal who
watches the world, unseen, to
whom everything is very close,
very important, full of wonder.
Listen to this lovely sound
from "In Fear of Harvests":
The nostrils of slow horses
Breathe evenly,
And the brown bees drag their
' high garlands,
Heavily,
Toward hives of snow.
And \Fhat mature joy in this
poem, .' The Jewel" (quoted in
full):
There is this cave
In the air behind my body
IAAMUN

Chat nobody is going to touch:
A cloister, a silence
Closing around a blossom of
fire.
When I stand upright in the
wind,
My pones turn to dark
emeralds.
In "Branch" there is one of
the best American political po
ems, "Eisenhower's Visit to
Franco, 1959," and there is the
amazing poem about America,
"Autumn Begins in Martin's
Ferry, Ohio." The latter cap-
tures so much of America in just
12 amazing lines, without com-
mon and facile condemnation or
simplistic melancholy. It is a
compassionate and penetrating
poem, showing the men who talk
about America as if it were not
the miserable place that it is
for them, "dreaming of heroes;"
the America, "suicidally beau-
tiful," with its people attaining
moments of beauty in their piti-
ful, suicidal rush to be prettiest,

most successful, and most popu-
lar.
In his n e w book, Shall We
Gather at the River, he has, in
some ways, advanced even fur-
ther. We havesan even greater
sense of honesty, of reality in
his voice, an even greater sense
of a man really speaking to us.
He is even more powerful in giv-
ing' us the terrors, the deepest
sorrows of our lives. Some of the
poems a r e almost unbearably
moving. The 1 a s t one in the
book, "To the Muses," is a ter-
rible and beautiful poem - the
sorrow so deep and honest, the
voice so real.
When so many poets, partic-
ularly the younger ones, are
content with poems t h a t are
safe, tribal, competent, flippant,
Wright has those two rare and
most important qualities: cour-
age, and spiritual strength and
maturity. When he reads you
could almost touch his love and
tremendous compassion. I have
a very deep love for his poetry.

POTPOURRI
INTERNATIONAL
VARIETY SHOW
Music ... Dancing ...
Refreshments

APRIL 12

9 P.M.

NEWMAN CENTER
330 Thompson
Admission: $1.00-Members
$1.25-Non-Members
LADIES ADMITTED FREE
DIAL 8-6416
3rd HIT WEEK

.
i

0

4-l T1bI10

"CONSTITUTES MORE OF AN
EXPERIENCETHAN A SHOW!'
--Time Maga:ine

f

r--

SEE WHAT THE BEST ANN ARBOR
FILMMAKERS ARE UP TO

8/SUPER-8 FILM FESTIVAL
APRIL 11-a12-13
with Cash Awards, Films, Gift Certificates, Fame
FRI.-SAT.: AUD. A SUN.: CANTERBURY
ANGELL, 11:00 P.M. HOUSE, 7:30 P.M.
TO ENTER YOUR FILM, CALL 769-5625

r

In
to

an attempt
enliven Ann Arbor

first annual
OZONE Festival
Sat., nite - April 12
8:30 P.M.
at Avehicle
639 S. Main St.
(behind Berry's Appliance store)

I

Eu"n "rmnv

STARRING
Commander Cody &
The Lost Planet Airmen
STARRING
The Original Charging
Rhinocerous of Soul
Admission-$1.25 at the door
Costumes would be
nice . . . again!.
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
dir. Ingmar Bergman
Swedish 1952
Berg man's
most erotic film
"The most hautiful film of the

I

Ae ANN ARBOR
Featuring the PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
at all concerts
THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor RICHARD TUCKER, Tenor
Program
"Classical" Symphony...............................Prokofieff
Concert aria and Recitative, K. 431, "Misero!
a sogno! o son desto" ................................Mozart
Recitative and aria, "Sound an Alarm," from
"Judas Maccabeus" .............Handel
"Iberia". ........................................Debussy
"0 Paradiso" from "L' Africaine" ......................Meyerbeer
"No! pazzo son! guardate' from "Manon Lescaut".............Puccini
MR. TUCKER
Symphonic Poem, "Pines of Rome" ................... .... Respighi
FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
HANS RICHTER-HAASER, Pianist JOANNA SIMON, Mezzo-soprano
Program
Psalm 150,"Op. 5 ............ .......... ,. Ginastera
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UN1ON
Aria from "Bomarzo"...... .. Ginastera
JOANNA SIMON
"Fern Hill'.................. ................. John Corigliano
(to text by Dylan Thomas)
JOANNA SIMON
Concerto No. 1 in E minor, Op. 1C1 .............Chopin
HANS RICHTER-HAASER.......Coi
SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
Program
Overture to "Die Meistersinger" ...... ................. . Wagner
Symphony No. 3 ..................................Charles Ives
Symphony No. 1 (with "Blumine") ........................Mahler

101

T Jo nsn

11

SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 2:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
MARIA STADER, Sporano JOHN McCOLLUM, Tenor
JOANNA SIMON, Mezzo-soprano WILLIS PATTERSON, Bass
ZARA NELSOVA, Cellist
Program
Mass in A-flat, No. 5........... ......................Schubert
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION and SOLOISTS
Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra . ..................... Elgar
ZARA NELSOVA
SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
REGINE CRESPIN,,Soprano

F4

John McCollum

I I .. .:..

iil

K-

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