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January 09, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-09

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January 9, 1969-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paem ThrAt4

January 9, '1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I uyt= i f if Ct.

,
7

the
news toda
b, The Associated Press and College Press Service
CHARLES DE GAULLE'S EMBARGO against arms
shipments to Israel came against opposition within his
government yesterday.
One .Gaullist National Assembly deputy, Jacques Hebert,
went on a privately owned radio station to call the embargo
"inadmissible."a
The French press presented a nearly united opposition to
the president's embargo order. Information Minister Joel le
Theule retorted that "Israeli influence has made itself felt
. . . in the information media."
Informed government sources said that Foreign Minister
Michel Debre is bitter because he was not consulted and be-
cause of his long identification with French support for Israel.
GASOLINE SUPPLIES were reported ample by most
of the nation's major oil companies yesterday as a strike
by 60,000 oil workers entered its fifth day with no settle-

Early registration
brings late return

By MICHAEL THORYN
If the campus seemed a little
dead yesterday, blame early
registration.
A large butdundetermined
number of students who had
the energy to advance classify
and register during the Univer-
sity's first early registration
Dec. 4-20 haverlittle reason to
return to Ann Arbor prior to
classes that begin today.
Students willing to skip the
first days of card shuffling may
not return to snowy Ann Arbor
until Sunday.
Those who had to register and
those who dropped or added
courses moved through Water-
man yesterday at almost un-
precedented speed.
The n er 2) c.I-kitrc. z P

ment in sight. i ve suens em-
The most serious shortage appeared to be Michigan where py by the registration and
the striking Oil Chemical and Atomic Workers ,union said csieitra iofan fee a ments
about 10 per cent of the service stations have shut down, seemed to agree that the early
mostly because drivers won't cross picket lines to deliver gaso- registration made their work
line, easier.
The union said it was arranging for emergency deliveries "It's been a lot more relaxed,"
of fuel to Michigan's state hospitals and prisons. said a pretty woman who spent
the past three days checking
IBM cards. "The lines are not
THE U.S. COMMAND is clinging to a hope that more asI ong." On Monday, 4700 stu-
American prisoners of war may be released soon by the dents registered. y s
Viet Cong. "It went rather smoothly,"
The hope is built chiefly on clandestine radio broadcasts said a student in the process of
by the National Liberation Front, the political arm of the scrapping all but one of his
Viet Cong, last month that allied officials should be ready to courses and adding new ones.
receive prisoners in various areas. But, since three Americans "I'm impressed."
were . freed New Year's day, there has been no further men- Surveying the milling people
from a running track above the
tion of future releases by the NLF. fee payment room in Waterman,
One U.S. spokesman said the command did not believe Registration Director John Ste-
the escape from the Viet Cong of three prisoners of war had wart smiled broadly. He had
hurt the prospects for more releases. spent most of December herd-
9 0 *r ing 13,624 students through ear-
LAWRENCE F. O'BRIEN urged yesterday that a full ly registration and much of the
rest of his working time since
time professional be selected to succeed him as chairman -
of the Democratic National Committee. "
O'Brien said that in his farewell speech next Tuesday to Increasect in
the National Committee he will recommend that the commit-
tee "be run like a good sized business operation." For this tol
be possible, he said, the chairman or a second man must be forEshe
full time,.o
Of the three leading contenders for the chairmanship, NEW YORK 01)--Apprehension
only former Gov. Terry L. Sanford of North Carolina is in a over a "credit' crunch" is growing
position to take a full time post. The other two are Sen. Fred as interest rates climb and the
R. Harris of Oklahoma and Rep. James G. O'Hara of Michigan. availability of lending money
" * * tightens.
SIRHAN BISHARA SIRHAN'S ATTORNEYS moved For the third time in six weeks,
formally yesterday to set aside his plea of innocent in major banks raised the prime rate,
order to quash an indictment charging him with mur- the basic interest charge on loans
derinR eto the most credit-worthy cor-
dng Robert F. Kennedy. . porations this time to a record
Judge Herbert V. Walker said that the motion was not 7 per cent in New York City,
necessary and that the attorneys should prepare a motion to banks were also on the verge of an
quash the indictment in writing. increase in rates on personal loans
The defense also renewed a motion for separate juries to finance automobiles, home ap-
juispliances and home improvements.
for the trial itself and for a decision on the penalty. The re- The;new ncrease bro ears
The new increase brought fears
newed motion was promptly denied. that a crunch was developing.
The judge also denied a motion for a 30-day continu- While high interest rates alone do
ance so the defense can question the jury commissioner about not bring on a crunch, they are
the makeup of the selection list for trial jurors who indicted evidence that bank's funds are in
$irhan. Walker explained that there had been time to ques- great demand.
tion the commissioner and that the idea must have occurred This tightening affects business
to the defense before. and individuals, slowing corporate

October planning the Waterman
operation.
"Late registration b e g i n s
Thursday,"' Stewart said. Stu-
dents who missed the 4:30 p.m.
deadline yesterday must pay a
$15 fee before they will be al-
lowed to register.
The late registration process
will be conducted in room 1514,
LS&A Building.
Both Stewart and Ernest Zim-
mermann, assistant to the vice
president for academic affairs
aresunsure if there willbe an
early registration for the fall,
1969 term. Zimmermann out-
lined the problem.
"From fall to winter, we have
a fairly steady group of people,"
Zimmerman said. "From winter
to fall we can't be sure."
Last fall, 300 students who
registered failed to pick up their
materials.
"It's a long time between
April and September," Zimmer-
mann added. "The problem is
not knowing who is coming
back."
Kay Towle of the Junior-
Senior Counseling Office said
work there went "very well."
"We did a lot less counseling
than usual," he said.
Today, when students will
need a counselor's signature to
drop and add, Mrs. Towle ex-
pects the office to be crowded.
A secretary in the honors of-
fice agreed. "There seem to be
fewer students," she said. "Park-
ing is still easy."
Though the registration mood
was pleasant, some students still
have complaints. "Why do we
,have to fill out these inane ad-
dress cards when our address
doesn't change?" a woman ex-
claimed.
terest rates,
Igh ten credil

Ek
Israei
By The Associated Press B
Amid reports that Israel either the
has a nuclear bomb or will soon retr
have one, Prime Minister Levi unt
Eshkol yesterday bitterly ruled out pea
France as a potential peace-maker E
in the Middle East. den
An NBC news report last night oni
said Israel is expected to have an one

blasts - om
A-bomb

oth Eshkol and Eban hold
idea that Israel would not
reat from the cease-fire lines
il she was assured of a lasting
ce.
shkol declared French Presi-
t Charles de Gaulle's embargo
arms to Israel was "not only a.
-sided indefensible act by one
ereign state toward another."
is damages theprospects of
Le in the Middle East," he said.
This action can be compared
that of binding the hands of
of the disputants in an arena
is threatened by the other-
this by a third party which
claim to objectivity and to a

BULLETIN
BEIRUT, Lebanon (IP)-Rash-
id Karame, a hawkish partisan
of Egypt's President Nasser,
was asked yesterday to form
a new Cabinet to replace the
Lebanese government that col-
lapsed in the wake of Israel's
comando strike on Beirut air-
port.
It appeared certain that the
move would turn Lebanon to a
harder pro-Arab, anti-Israel
line in the Middle East dispute.
effective delivery system for
nuclear bombs within three years.

sov
"Th
peat
to t
one
who
and
lays

role of peacemaker in our area. The military governor of El
"From such a party, the call for! Arish, Lt. Col. Menachem Babioff,
peace sounds hollow indeed." told newsmen in Tel Aviv the re-
In Israel, military operations settlement was prompted by hu-
continue. manitarian reasons and the. fact
Israel's armed forces have be- El Qantara, long battered in Is-
gun clearing all civilians from El raeli-Egyptian artillery duels, is a
Qantara on the Suez Canal, one restricted military area.
of the cities in Arab lands that The International Red Cross is
they have occupied now for 19 supervising the operation. A Red
months. Cross representative, Jean Engi-
Troops started moving El Qan- man, said the Israelis operated
tara's 243 Egyptian families yes- under a section' of the Geneva
terday to quarters in El Arish, 80 Convention providing: "An occu-
miles to the east on the Media- pying power may undertake the
terranean coast. They were prom- total evacuation of a given area
ised work there and schooling for if the security of the population so
their children. demands."

New supervisors
year attacking

I

I6erumle;
rumored

begin

In a report from Washington on
the Huntley-Brinkley Show, NBC By JIM HECK
said Israel embarked on a crash The new 13-man County Board
program to produce a nuclear of Supervisors held its first meet-
weapon two years ago. ing Tuesday dealing several fero-
"The tipoff to its success in the cious blows to Sheriff Douglas J.
development of a nuclear bomb," Harvey.
the report said, "came when The supervisors denied a request
American intelligence services dis- that Harvey be supplied with a
covered Israeli agents quietly buy- full-time paid auditor, began an
ing special materials and part investigation into his use and ac-
which could be used only in nu- quisition of police dogs, and elect-
clear weapons." ed as their chairman Harvey's
Foreign Minister Abba Eban, most vehement and vocal critic,
speaking with Eshkol before a Bent Nielsen.
conference of world Jewry, urged Harvey, who begins his second
Israel to go forward from "bel- consecutive term as sheriff this
ligerency to hate." month, has been the target of
board criticism for the last two
years.
de m andsHarvey demanded an auditor be"
attached to his department be-
cause of "the load of bookkeeping
dumped on me." Last year's sup-
s e ervisors demanded a running audit
of his finances.
were difficult to get. The rate of A new district court set-up now
housing starts collapsed because requires Harvey to file hisfines
litte mneywasavalabe fr jand costs directly with the county
little money was available for easurer
mortgage loans. Individuals found i t uer.
it hard to get loans to finance In the past, Harvey needed only
purchases of automobiles, appli- to file his fines and costs with the
ances, furniture and other majorc "I'm not a bookkeeper," Harvey
items."

In a surprise move, the super-
visors voted to disband the present
39 board committees in favor of
five more comprehensive ones.
Last year's supervisors had ap-
pointed many of their retiring
members as heads of the 39 com-
mittees. The action, in effect,
eliminates many of the old sup-
ervisors from participating in the
new board structure.
The supervisors spent most ofj
their first meeting setting new
rules to govern, the new 13-man
body. Prosecuting Attorney Wil-

UIarvey
liam F. Delhey advised the board
for two and a half hours on the
new rules,
The supervisors must also set
their salaries, a task that is usual-
ly done quietly by political bodies.
Several members indicated the
board may ask for a compensa-
tion comparable to that of a state
legislator. State legislators now
receive $15,000 per year.
Last year's board chairman,
Robert M. Harrison, will continue
meeting with the board as the
county's newly elected clerk.

ALsselbly postpones student
membership on com1miittee

3
r
r
s
1
t1
C
i

and more expensive to obtain
loans.
Indications of a possible crunch
were seen in mid-Decepnber when
the Federal Reserve Board boosted
its discount rate-the interest at
which its member banks borrow
money to build reserves for lending
to their customers. The intention
of that action by the Federal Re-
serve, as well as the recent boost
to 7 per cent, was to slow the pace
of economic growth and stem in-
flation by reducing the amount of
available money.
Interest rates in general have
been moving upward for several
months as it became increasingly
apparent that a combination of
higher taxes and tight money were
not having the desired effect of
cooling down a badly overheated
economy.
Yet despite h i g h interest
charges, corporations have con-
tinued to borrow at a fast rate in
fear of even higher rates ahead.
The term crunch came into
general use to describe a money
crisis in 1966 when the tightness
of lending money triggered a so-
called mini-recession.
Expansion slowed because loans

EIGHTY CUBAN SURVIVORS of a group that drove
a tractor-trailer under fire to seek asylum at Guantan-
amo Naval Base in Cuba were flown to Miami yesterday.
A U.S. State Department spokesman said many others
in the party did not make it to the base when Cuban soldiers
opened fire. Some refugees estimated as many as 150 persons
had been involved in the escape attempt Monday night.

expansion and making it more
difficult for consumers to obtain
loans.
With the economy surging ahead
despite the government's hope
that the 10 per cent income tax
surcharge would slow it down, the
demand for loans has swallowed
up much of the banks' lending
money. As a result, it is harder

Funds available were diverted
to those willing to pay the highest
interest.
The result was a snowballing ef-
fect on the economy. Manufac-
turers sold fewer cars and other
products on down the line either'
because the consumers couldn't'
obtain financing or were unwilling
to pay high interest rates.
The gross national product to-
tal of all goods and services -
showed its first decline in terms
of constant dollars in the first
~quarter of 1967.
Leif H. Olsen, senior vice pres-
ident and economist of New York's
First National City Bank, sees the
possibility of a crunch developing.
But he doesn't expect it to be
as severe as that of 1966 because
money is still not so scarse as it
became in 1966.
Kevin Winch, senior economist
for Rinfret-Boston Associates, a
New York economic consulting
firm, sees a parallel to the 1966
money situation. But he, too,
doesn't expect it to become as ser-
ious as in 1966, for the same rea-
son.
However, banks already are ex-
aming loan applications more se-
verely-than a few months ago.

told the supervisors. He claimed
he could no longer fbe responsible
for $2,000 "laying around the de-
partment" because it has not yet
been properly audited.
But at the heated insistence of
County Treasurer Sylvester A.
Leonard, the supervisors decided
Harvey was capable of doing the
work himself.
Leonard claimed the extra aud-
iting burden was on his depart-
ment and not the sheriff's. "And
I haven't asked for any more
help," Leonard told Harvey.
,"He doesn't need an account-
ant," Leonard advised the board.
Harvey also requested a pay
raise for his deputies.
Nielsen, who chairs the new
board with seven years past ex-
perience in county government,
campaigned heavily in November,
on the suggestion the sheriff's po-
sition be appointed by the board,
rather than elected by the county
residents.
Nielsen has initiated several of
the investigations into Harvey's
department, which last year cul-
minated in an official investiga-
tion by the state auditor general
of Harvey's finances.
Nielsen is considered a moderate
Republican.

By ROB BEATTIE
The Senate Assembly delayed
implementation of a proposal to,
include students on its Research
Policies committee, asking / the
committee to clarify the proposed
method for selecting student mem-
bers. The action came at the As-
sembly's December. meeting..
The plan, submitted with the
approval of the Senate Advisory
Committee on University Affairs,
suggested that one undergraduate
and three graduate students be
given full voting rights on the re-
search committee.
DEVISE METHODS
In October, the Assembly passed
a resolution urging all committees
to work out methods for including
students in their activities. The
motion required, however, that all
new plans for the selection of stu-
dent members be submitted to the
Assembly for approval.
The research committee, which
advises the vice president for re-
search on general matters of clas-
sified and unclassified University
research, was the first of SACUA's
nine committees to submit a plan
for student representation.
This is not the classified Re-
search Committee (Coon Commit-
tee) which passes on particular
classified projects.
"We are ready to go ahead with
student reperesentation as soon as
the Assembly gives us the green
light," said Prof. Robert Elder-
field, chairman of the research
committee.
The committee plan called for
the selection of the undergraduate
representative by Student Govern-
ment Council "in accordance with
regular procedures."
NOT SO SIMPLE
The procedure outlined for se-
lection of graduate students was
not so simple. Elderfield com-
mented that the committee had
problems in choosing a method for

selecting graduate student repre-
sentatives since not all graduate
students are affiliated with Grad-
uate Assembly.,
The committee therefore de-
cided to divide all graduate and
professional students into four
divisional classifications: biologi-
cal and health sciences, physical
sciences and engineering, social
sciences, and humanities and the,
arts.
Two nominees would be selected
from each of these areas after
consultation with student groups
within each division. GA would
then select the three members of
the committee from the eight
nominees with the stipulation that
no two members come from. the
same division.
Assembly members felt that the
wording of the proposal was un-
clear as to who woulO nominate
the students from each area.
'They objected more to the word-
ing of the proposal than to the
principle of the thing," Elder-
field said.
He commented that his 'com-
mittee is working with SACUA on
a streamlined proposal which will
be presented to the Assembly at
its meeting this month.
STUDENT MEMBERS
Two of the Assembly's eleven
committees, the Student Relations
Committee and the Civil Liberties
Board, had student members prior
to the Assembly's proposal.
Several other Assembly commit-
tees have expressed an interest in
adding student members, but no
other proposalsrhave been sub-
mitted for approval.
The Classified Research Com-
mittee, chaired by Prof. William
Coon of the medical school, has
withdrawn a student representa-
tion proposal because vacancies
have occurred in' the committee's
membership. The remaining mem-
bers felt that the committee should
be at full membership before a-
mechanism for the selection of
s t u d e n t representatives was
chosen.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 10
RABBI JAMES GORDON OF YOUNG ISRAEL OF OAK WOODS
SPEAKS at the FIRST HILLEL SABBATH
SERVICE OF THE SEMESTER 7:15 P.M.
On
"PREMARITAL SEX AND
THE JEWISH MORAL CODE"
SATURDAY, JANUARY 11
RABBI GORDON ALSO SPEAKS ATSHALOSH SEUDOTfat 12:30 on:
"WHAT INGREDIENT DOES JUDAISM OFFER
A HAPPY MARRIAGE?"
TO ATTEND THE LUNCHEON, AS WELL AS THE TALK, RESERVATIONS MUST BE MADE IN
WITH THE KOSHER KO-OP 663-4129.

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Alas IMOGENE I 'CHANTIN&I,
-' attS, N.Y hapruan, N .Y. News
C C"A SMASH 1111" COCA lB1'
--fife Mai Nadel, World 3c1i. 6
KING +
DONOVAN
~R o8ERT ANVERSON S
ALAN SUN DER
RAND KATIE S44ERMAN
MITCHELL EFL1N LLOYD

COME TO
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and visit
PETE SHERMAN
SANDREA
DON BREITER

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