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January 09, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January

'CADEMIC CREDIT AT ISSUE:
LSA committees disagree over ROTC

Mansfield urges joint tax
position by Nixon, Johnson

FLICKS-TONIGHT

Buster

By DAVID SPURR
Two key committees in the
literary college are currently play-
ing hot-potato with a touchy list
of recommendations that would
sharply curtail the status of
ROTC in the college.
The central question is how
much credit should be granted for
literary college students enrolled
in the military programs.
Yesterday the college executive
commiteee, chaired by Dean Wil-
liam Hays, sent the list of recom-
mendations back to the curriculum

committee, where it emerged last
month after months of study.
Members of the executive com-
mittee questioned the curriculum
committee's proposal cutting the
current 12 credit hours granted
to students enrolled in ROTC to
four.
Hays said, "We were puzzled
about the four hours. We are
going to ask the curriculum com-
mittee to go back and look at the
programs, course by course."
Prof. James Gindin of the Eng-
lish Department, chairman of the

Tenants'

union ealis

curriculum committee, justified
his committee's action on the
basis of "evaluation of course con-
tent and academic value . . . none
of the committee members felt
that the current 12 hours given
for ROTC programs should be
continued."
Gindin said his committee de-
cided to recommend four hours
of credit, however, because they
decided the programs were "not
totally worthless" in terms of
academic value.
Under the proposal, the four
credit hours must be part of the
12 hours a student may elect out-
side the college.
"Because every ROTC course
mixes propaganda and 'leadership'
training with genuine academic
material," Gindin3 said,, "no single
course could be singled out for
credit-the only way to solve this
is to grant credit as a blanket
matter for the programs."
Qindin said he personally felt
the amount of outside work re-
quired for ROTC courses was "al-
T oda y's reviews

credit to ROTC was politically
motivated angered Gindin. The
other side was unpleased, too,
however.
"The military commandants of
the three programs felt the in-
vestigation was political," he said.
"It was academic. We have no
desire to get rid of the military at
all costs."
Col. Antonio Criscuolo, com-
mandant of the Air Force ROTC
program on campus, declined
comment on the recommendations.
The other two commandants were
unavailable.
A d d i t ional recommendations
from the curriculum committee
would eliminate ROTC grades
from counting in a student's
grade point average, and put stu-
dents dropping ROTC under the
jurisdiction of the literary college.
The executive committee had no
argument with these proposals.
At any rate, the problem of
ROTC status in the college appears
destined for more debate and in-
vestigation, and any decision
reached by the college faculty
would not have effect until at
least 1970.

WASHINGTON 0P) - Senate
Democratic Leader Mike M a n s-
field urged President-elect Nixon
yesterday I to join with President
Johnson in taking a position on
the 10 per cent income surtax.
Mansfield said in an interview
Johnson made it clear at a White
House bipartisan leadership
meeting Tuesday he is "most de-
sirous of working with the Presi-
dent-elect on this and other vital
matters."
At stake is Johnson's attempt
to submit to Congress next week
a new budget calculated to yield
a small surplus. Mansfield s a i d
lack of word from Nixon has con-
tributed to delaying both John-
son's State of the Union and bud-
get messages.
"It would be in the best inter-
ests of the nation for the outgo-
ing, and incoming presidents to
work together on such matters in
a period in which President John-
son's responsibilities are fading
and Mr. Nixon's are just begin-
ning," Mansfield said.
Mansfield declined to speculate
whether Johnson could achieve a
balanced budget without ptopos-

ing continuance of the 10 per
cent tax. The tax will expire next
June 30 unless Congress acts to
renew it. The tax is bringing in
around $12 billion a year.
Nixon called during the cam-
paign for an end to the surtax.
But he left room for its retention
while the Vietnam was continues
saying that "once the war is end-
ed we should get rid of the tax."

7:00 The Playhouse
P.M. The Haunted House
One week

f

films made 1920-23 min. each- shown at silent speed (without
dubbed effects or speed-up)

Second cass postage paida
Arbor, Michigan, 420 MaynardS
Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
Daily except Monday during
academic school year.

at Ann
St., Ann
regular

CANTERBURY HOUSE

(330 Maynard)

SDS benefit-75c - coffee & donuts at cost

KEATON

9:00 The Electric House
P.M. The Frozen North
The Baloonatic

..r1 M"r"""--R

"_".O"O"r1om"

ent strike meeting

(Poo

By DAN SHARE .
The Ann Arbor Tenant's Union
will hold a meeting of organizers
at 8 p.m. tonight in the Union
Assembly Hall to finalize plans
for the proposed rent strike.
Plans include the non-payment
of rent and ,refusal to sign new
leases on the, part of all students
renting from members of the Ann
Arbor Property Managers Assoc-
iation. The union hopes to gain
recognition as a bargaining agent
for students.
The strike will begin when
2,000 people pledge to withhold
their rent.
The meeting tonight is to re-
cruit and inform organizers-peo-
ple who, at the individual level,
will canvass the student popula-
tion for support.
Those participating in the
Lawyers ask
eourt hearings
for protesters1
WASHINGTON (P) - The tidal
wave of campus disorders swept
up to the Supreme Court Tuesday
in the form of 4 plea that the
justices limit the power of college
officials to expel student protest-'
ers
The novel appeal, filed by law-
yers for 10 ousted students, asks
the court to require administra-
tors to give fair and impartial
hearings to students facing expul-
sion.
The appeal argues that student
demonstrators are exercising
their right to free speech. Conse-
quently, the theory runs, a stu-
dent threatened with punishment
for demonstrating is entitled to
the parallel right of a trial-type
hearing.

meeting's planning say it will take
100 organizers to recruit the
needed 2,000 people. Sixty have
signed up to work as organizers
so far.
A list of all properties manag-
ed by members -of the association
is being compiled and now in-
cludes some 1,000 units, roughly
two-thirds of the total.-
Association members include the
Ann Arbor Trust Co.; Apartments,
Limited; Campus Mgt.; Charter
Realty; Dahlmann Apts.; Miscoe
Mgt.; Patrick Pulte, Inc.; Sum-
mit Associats; Walden Mgt.; and
Wilson-White Co.
Ron Glotta, a noted attorney
specializing in rental law, h a s
been retained as an attorney for
the strike and either he or an
associate will attend the meeting
to give a detailed explanation of
legal implications of a rent strike.
Organizers of the strike hope
to reach an agreement on the kind
of central structure the union will
have and the exact nature of the
escrow fund in which rents will
be held. They stress that what-
ever kind of executive 'committed
may come out of the meeting, "all
policy decisions will be made by
the group as a whole."
Work is also progressing on a
supportive boycott on the part of
students not living in housing
rented from the association. These
students are being asked not to
sign any leases with association
members until it recognizes t he
tenant's union as a bargaining
agent.
Once it gains bargaining status
the Union hopes to achieve:
-'significant reductions in rent;
-determination of the length of
lease by the lessee;
-abolition of the damage deposit;
-elimination of advance payment
of the last month's rent;
-immediate handling of all com-
plaints;
--and free, adequate parking for
all units.

SUNIVERSITY
MUSICL OcI

r
j'
- t

E-Ty

r

are on Page

7

I

* MAD MARVIN IS BACK * *
and welcomes you back to the finest in "total cinema"
at the Vth Forum.Thur., Fri., Sat., Sun. at 11:00 P.M.
stop by. .You won't be disappointed.
-j-''separate admission ~~

Presents The
GREGG SMITH SINGERS

most entirely minimal enough to
be carried as overload (without
credit) ."
But apparently not quite mini-
mal enough. Whether an ROTC
program is worth four or six hours
is trivial to the committee mem-
bers. While they don't feel it
should be given full academic
status, they were unanimous in
the belief that ROTC should re-
main on campus "as long as any
students are interested in it."
Suggestions from some students
that granting even four hours

l1II

COME TO
Student Book Service
and visit
MANNY PAPASIFAKIS
DICK WINTER
LANCE

I

I

9

ANN ARBORI
CIVIC THEATRE

- MCHGN

- TONIGHT-
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
MIA FARROW
ROBERT MITCHUM
in "SECRET CEREMONY"

Presents
"CRITIC'S
CHOICE"
by Ira Levin
January 8,9,10, 11
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
8:00 P.M.

THIS WEEK 7 FILMS
a three hour cinematic trip
" HUEY
the story of Huey Newton and the Black Panthers.
* LISTEN, WHITEY
Block reaction to the assassination of Dr. King.
* WEST AFRICA, ANOTHER VIET NAM?
Feature length. The guerrilla movement in West
Africa against the Portugese. Including an actual
attack on the Occupying Colonial Army! "This is THE
movie on guerrilla warfare"-Peter Werbe, {editor,
Fifth Estate.,

FRIDAY *
MUST 1-AppEN ONCE TO EVERyONE?
OSkAR
4 ~WERNER.
r r E RR IS
,.ThE biTER-srWE IoEt1 STORY Of A yOUNq iRIand
____________ A MARRiEd MAN

I

Box Office Open 10 A.M.-Curtain
668-6300

I_

I

* HUELGA!
Cesar Chavez narrates. The California Grape Strike,
why?
" PLUS RIOTOUS HUMOR with Wig Wag, an early
"drag" comedy, our continuing Buck Rogers space
serial, and a Betty Boop cartoon.

I

+1

"A MEMORABLE,
COMPLETELY
F ASCINATING FILM!"
-Richard Shickel, LIFE Magazine
"Simply Superb!"
-Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post

the '4

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