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January 14, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 14, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Cycles sell
in Classifieds
The most complete
supply of
NEW and USED TEXTS
and PAPERBACKS
is of the
Student Book Service

Why Are
Poor Talker ?
A noted publisher in Chicago re-
ports a simple technique of every-
day conversation which can pay you
real dividends in social and business
advancement and works like magic
to give you poise, self-confidence
and greater popularity.
According to this publisher, many
people do not realize how much they
could influence others simply by
what they say and how they say it.
Whether in business, at social func-
tions, or even in casual conversa-
tions with new acquaintances there
are ways to make a good impression
every time you talk.
To acquaint the readers of this
paper with the easy-to-follow rules
for developing skill in everyday con-
versation, the publishers have print-
ed full details of their interesting
self-training method in a new book-
let, "Adventures in Conversation,"
which will be mailed free to anyone
who requests it. No obligation. Send
your name, address, and zip code to:
Conversation, 835 Diversey Pkwy;
Dept. 169-011, Chicago, Ill. 60614. A
postcard will do.

APPROPRIATIONS, TUITION FIGHT:

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'U' of California battles Reagan., again

BERKELEY, Calif. (CPS) - lion in tax funds, an increase of
California may be heading for a $49.9 million. The state colleges
repeat of last year's big battle want $285.2 million, an increase of
over tuition at state colleges and $60.9 million, over last year.
I universities, which have tradition- This doesn't include money for
I ally been "tuition-free." salary increases or building con-
The scenario is familiar. The struction. The university wants to
University of California and the increase salaries by between 4.7
California state colleges have and 5.2 per cent. The colleges,
asked for more than Governor whose salary scale has been slip-
Ronald Reagan wants to give ping in recent years, want an in-
I them. And the university regents crease of 12.6 per cent. No dollar
are already talking about turning costs have yet been given for these
to other sources to make up the increases.
difference. For the first time, higher ed-
The university wants $341.1 mil- ucation will be dipping heavily

into tax funds for construction up the difference Reagan tried to
money. The November defeat of a persuade the regents to institute
bond measure that would have a $400 tuition charge.
given the universities and colleges That would have ended more
each $100 million for building than 100 years of "tuition-free"
means that higher education will higher education in California,
be battling with local school dis- and the Regents refused to do it.
tricts for the $100 million that is But students do pay "fees" of $240
expected to be available for state- a year and the regents did agree
id t ti1 to raise that to $tgf)

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wiae consbrucinon.
When the regents approved the
university's budget at a meeting
in November, Reagan warned them
that their budget "cannot be ap-
proved by the state; there just
isn't the wherewithall."
One regent wondered whether
that might mean another hike in
student fee charges, but he was:
assured that a fee hike would be
viewed only as a "last resort." But
that did not set to rest visions'
of last year's tuition battle.
In 1968 the university asked for
$311 million from the state, but
Reagan and the legislature cut
that back to $291 million. To make

The controversy set off a wave
of student protests and marches to
Sacramento in protest, but they
did no good. With radical students
at Berkeley hoping to resurrect
the campus' activist tradition in
1969, however, a tuition fight
could set off even more militant
protests this year.
If Reagan decides to push again
for an increase in student charges,
either in fees or tuition, he'll prob-
ably find the regents much more
receptive than they were last year.
Recent changes in t h e Board's
membership have given Reagan
much more influence among the
regents.
The legislature is expected to
react adversely to the wave of dis-
orders which have been sweeping
California campuses. D o n Mul-
ford, a top Assembly Republican
leader, has predicted that there
will be no salary increases.

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LCQ

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LOOK AT YOUR FUTURE
PPG representatives will interview at
University of Michigan on
January 20 & 30, 1969
Through careful selection, 'placement, and a well planned
program of individual development, PPG employs college
graduates to help meet today's challenges and provide
managerial leadership for the future. Because of PPG's
diversity of products, locations, and'career openings, we
feel it is well worth 30 minutes of your time to explore
these opportunities with our representative; he is interested
in you and your future.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

The
EMPIRE BUILDERS
are not exactly what we need.
City builders are all we're look-
ing for right at the moment.
City builders, in our language,
are engineers. And a growing
city like Milwaukee needs
plenty of those. If you are one,
we need you to design streets,
sewers and structures, to sup-
ervise construction, to try your
hand in one (or maybe all -
if you stay around a while) of
the many departments of local
government c o n c e r n e d with
building a great city.
Our interviewer will be on your
campus soon. Your placement
office can tell you when.

Order
Your
Subscription
Today'
764-0558

The most complete
supply of
NEW and USED TEXTS
and PAPERBACKS
is at the
Student Book Service

SALE

"ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

I
4

INDUSTRIES

611 Church st.

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rELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
Nod
'Will he on campus,
Jan. 15, 1969 (Wednesday)
Graduating Electrical Engineers and Mechani-
cal Engineers are invited to discuss career op-
portunities in research, design, development
and manufacturing in areasisuch as:
Airborne Radar Systems / Pilot Display Systems
Ground Support Equipment / Advanced Com-
puter Techniques / Advanced Electromechani-
cal Design Techniques' Optical Devices
Norden's location in Norwalk, Connecticut is
easily accessible to the entire New York metro-
politanarea.
For convenient appointment, please make ar-
rangements in advance through your Placement

p

We can teach You
to read faster-(3-4-5 Times Faster)
with better comprehension
EVELYN WOOD READING
DYNAMICS FOR
IMPROVED
M GRADES
" CONCENTRATION
* COMPREHENSiON
t STUDY SKILLS
! RECALL SKILLS
* RESEARCH SKILLS
It is difficult for those who read in the plodding, old-fashioned
way to appreciate the sense of freedom that comes with
effortless reading. Most of you read the way people did a century
ago-word by word, atrates of perhaps 150 to 350 words
a minute.?
But now there is a new and modern way to read. It is called
Reading Dynamics. With it you can read at least three times
faster than you now do, without skipping or skimming.
You can learn this new way of reading in just a few hours a
week. It will help you to understand better what you read and
to remember it longer. And you'll find you enjoy your reading
more.
The Reading Dynamics method has been used by many
students, United States Senators, Congressmen, educators,
business executives and professional people. President Kennedy
asked us to give this course to members of his staff in the
White House.
In the last- decade Reading Dynamics has shown more
than 400,000 persons how to increase their reading speed
and comprehension substantially. We may be able to
do the same for you.
In fact, if you follow the course correctly, you will at least
triple your reading-comprehension rate, or your tuition will be
refunded.
Learn the facts about Reading Dynamics-plan
to join us in this exciting new experience.
FREE Mini-Lesson DEMONSTRATION

An Equal Opportunity Employer (M&F)

i

Engineers
Good ideas
get off the ground
at Boeing.
So do careers.
Let's talk about it on
Monday and Tuesday,
January 20 and 21.
At The Boeing Company, you can be a member
of a team that's famous for making good ideas fly.
Such as the 707, America's first jetliner. And
the 727 trijet, the 737 twinjet, Boeing-Vertol
helicopters, the Boeing-built first stage for the
National Aeronautics andrSpace Administration's
Apollo/Saturn V moon rocket. And the NASA,
Lunar Orbiter, the USAF Minuteman, and the USN
hydrofoil gunboat Tucumcarl.
Boeing has exciting new projects on the way up,
too. The 747 superjet, world's largest and fastest
commercial jetliner, scheduled to make its first
flight by the end of 1968. America's supersonic
transportnow being developed at the company's
Commercial Airplane Division. Plus other ad-
vanced programs in early development and on
Boeing drawing boards.
They can help get your career off to a dynamic
start in applied research, desigp, test, manufactur-
ing, service or facilities engineering or computer
tehnolonvu

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l

Survey

of De mand for Courses

,

in Languages of

EAST

RN

EUROPE

Would you like to take any of the following in the 1969 Fall Term?
FIRST-YEAR CZECH
SECOND-YEAR CZECH
FIRST-YEAR POLISH
SECOND-YEAR POLISH

N
y

YMCA-350 S. 5th Ave.
across from Ann Arbor Library
Monday, Jon..13:
1 P.M.-4 P.M., 6 P.M.-8 P.M.
* These days only e*
Tuesday, Jan. 14:
12 Noon-4 P.M., 6 P.M.-8 P.M.
If You Cannot Attend a Demonstration,
call collect 353-5111 or mail coupon

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