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March 23, 1969 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-23

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 23, 1969

dance
Dance concert: Precision

--music
A musical double header

By C. 4. SPINGLER
The University Dance Department concert
Friday evening should be distinguished for its
combination of clarity and precision of dance
technique with professional staging and original-
ity of choreography and musicalcomposition. The
few faults of the'show can be attributed to the
lack of facilities and space in the picturesque but
hardly modern Barbour Gym Studio.
Among the most outstanding numbers were
those whichintroduced new dimensions to modern
dance theatre by linking more intimately sound
and movement to create a new form of sympolic
gesture. This was done with particular success in
the dances; "Primitivis," choreographed by Craig
Gruenberg and Lauren Shapiro, "Confrontations"
by Amy Zell and "Comment" by Dana Reitz. The
first of these was accompanied only by vocal
sounds made by the dancers. Although highly
abstract, "Primitivism"' was dramatically powerful.
The voices went Well beyond the normal range
of speaking tones, sometimes sounding animal,
sometimes human, but always compelling because
of their source.
The electronic music by Peter Klausmeyer used
in Confrontations, emanated first from one side
of the stage then the other. It crackled and was a

sea-hell roar, but was happily free of the old
shreiking one often associates with this form of
music. It added definate form and structure to
the fluid movement of the dance.
"Comment," beautifully danced by Dana Reitz
and Craig Gruenberg revealed that electronic
music and abstract movement need not exclude
human warmth from dance theatre. It was as if
the dancing couple were inside a vacuum, buffeted
by mechanical forces, yet retaining a poignant
human element.
Also deserving special choreographic mention
is Carol Richard's "Epistle to Mr. Tambo," a brief
act without words, which suggests that dance is
one of the mediums which can most effectively
express the modern sense of wit and whimsy.
Lisa Goodman, who danced "Songs of Today
No. 1." revealed that she has that much sought
after quality, an acute sense of dramatic style.
This then was a well balanced concert, lacking
the self-indulgence which all too often is present
in attempts at modernity or personal creativity.
The dancers and the productions staff, Mrs. L. W.
Bergmann, Professor Vera Embree, Dr. Esther
Pease, Mr. J. Q. Adamson and Mr. Peter Wilde are
to be congratulated for pointing out that modern
dance is a theatrical experience which excells
the standard Broadway vehicle.

By JOE PEHRSON
Last night's presentation of
contemporary orchestral works
at Hill Aud. illustrated, through
wide variety, the inherent po-
tential of traditional instru-
ments for modern expression.
Some of the variety might be
attributed to the fact that ac-
tually two concerts were given--
one by the School of Music's
University Symphony Orchestra,
and the other by the Contem-
porary Directions Ensemble.
There was immediately some
degree, of audience alienation
produced by the fact that very
little program information on
the nature of the works, or the
composer's original intentions
was given to the listener. It
appears, from talking to one of
the composers, that the last
three works performed-the or-
chestral numbers, were masters
theses.
The first piece, Overlay by
Kurt Carpenter, the only under-
graduate, was rich in spectrum
of sound. The opening measures
were quite mystical, in almost
an oriental setting, complete
with Chinese gong. The sounds
throughout this work were un-
usually separate in pitch-ve ry
high pitches (flute, plucked

harp) were sounded simultan-
eously with low bass and cello
sounds. The result was a re-
markable feeling of presence, of
actual emersion in the work.
KABOP by David Robbins, the
third work performed by the
Ensemble, was very tightly knit.
This beautifully expressed tex-
tural quality was abruptly
broken by a fierce tribal drum
solo (shades of Iron Butterfly).
Still, the unity remained intact
as all themes rushed to a climax.
were broken, and guilt again.
Summer Music by Robert
Boury, the first orchestra work,
was somber-quite gloomy, and
irritatingly strident. This is not
everyone's impression of sum-
mer, but if one thiriks of sun-
stroke and burning pavement,
the musical imaginers is ap-
propriate. Here was musical
heat - independent themes
climbing in pitch, each choosing
a separate tonal resting place

in a college of harsh, painful
sounds.
Theconcluding number. End-
game by David Foley was dif-
ferent. A heavy sound-curtain
was spread, stopping abruptly to
let solo material break through.
Indeterminate percussion, al-
ways completely out of context,
intentionally irritated the audi-
ence, but so did the strange
trumpet ending which suggested
the title.

Chamber Theater-.
the poetry and prose
CARLSANDBURG .
transfigured for the stage
place: ALICE'S RESTAURANT *
date: Sunday, March 23, 7:00 P.M. -
price: 50c
sponsored by the Markley Library
t.

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
BetweenYpsilanti & Ann Arbor
FEATURE TIMES
Wed., Sat., Sun.
1:15, 3:50, 6:25, 9:00
Mon., Tues., 'rhurs., Fri.
7:00-9:15 l
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the emu players series present,
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The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: 89 by
carrier,, $10 by mail.

march 26-30 TIX $1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
(Weekdays 12:45-4:30 P.M.)

vt

C':.":t:t::{t$i4:':J A.". .:vhS . l ! 's"N '':St } Ck" Eait
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

of LaMancha: Hill Auditorium,
of LaMancha: Hill Auditorium,
p.m.

8:30
8:30

SUNDAY, MARCH 23
Day Calendar
Dance Concert: Barbour Gymnasium
Dance Studio, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Angela Davis, violin:
School of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
University Symphony Band: Wil-
liam D. Revelli, conductor: Hill Audi-
torium, 3:30 p.m.
Chamber Music Recital: Jack Roberts,
piano: School of Music Recital Hall,
4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild:, Marlene Dietrich and
Emil Jannings in The Blue Angel: Ar-
chitecture Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:05
p.mn.
Chamber Arts Series: Orchestra Mich-
elangelo Dli Firenze: Rackham Auditor-
ium, 8:30 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 24
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 85: North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.
Computer; Information and ,Control
Engineering Seminar: Prof. E. Bruce
Lee, Institute of Technology, Center for
Control Services, University of Minne-
sota, "Synthesis of Feedback Control-
lers for Systems with Time Delay": 1504
East Engineering, 4:00 p.m.
Department of English Lecture: Prof.
Robert- F. iGleckner, Department of
English, 'University of Califofrnia at
Riverside;, "Blake's Language": Rack-
ham Amphitheater, 4:10 p.m.
Ann Arbor Society, Archeological In-
9titute of America and the Department
of Classical Studies Lecture: Prof.
Miriam S. Balmuth, Department of
Classics, Tufts University, "The Philis-
tines": Auditorium B, Angell Hall, 4:10
P.m.
School of Natural Resources Lecture:
Stewart L. Udall, Former Secretary of
the Interior, "The Value Revolution":
Michigan League Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
School of Music Honors Assembly:
'Prof. Howard H. Peckham, Director,
Clements Library: Rackham Lecture
Hall, 8:00 pm.
Professional Theatre Program: David
Atkinson and aPtricia Marand in Man
DIAL 8-6416

Placement
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Placement Interviews held at Gen-
eral Division, call 763-1363 for appoint-
ments, or come to 3200 SA.B. Please
make appts. as early in the week as
possible.
general Notices
Radrick Farms Golf Course: will be
open for full time faculty and staff
.members on Monday, March 24, weath-
er permitting, and every day thereafter.
In the event of snow, rain, or freez-
ing weather that would damage greens,
the course will close during the incle-
ment weather only. Faculty and staff
may check by telephoning 764-9586.
Center for Russian and East European
Studies and Department of EconomicF-
Lecture: Vladimir Simunek, Associate
Professor, of Public Finance, Prague
School of Economics, "Current Imple-
mentation, of Economic Reforms in
Czechoslovakia": 101 Economics Blldg.
4:10 p.m., Tuesday, March 25.
The Henry Russel Lecture will be
delivered by Arnold M. Kuethe, Felix
Pawlowski, Professor of Aerodynamics,
Wednesday, March 26, 8:00 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheater. His lecture topic is
"Fluid Mechanical Aspects of Animal
Flight and Motion in Fluids" The
Henry Russel Award will also be made
at this time.

MONDAY, MARCH 24, 1969:
U.S. Navy, Detroit, Mich.: All degree
levels, all majors for U.S. Navy Sur-.
face Wave and Aviation Officer Pro-
grams.
U.S. Marine Corps, Detroit. Mich.: All
degree levels, all majors, for U.S. Ma-
rine Corps Officer Programs.
TUES., WED., MARCH 25 and 26:
U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps, see
listing above for Monday.
THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1969:
S. S. Kresge Company, Detroit, Mich.:
locations in Indiana and Ohio also.
Bach., level in Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts for
Management Training.
FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1969:
Defense Supply Agency, D e t r o i t,
Mich.: Bach., Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts.
Hist., Library Sci., Math, Philo., Pol.
Sci., and Speech for Mgmt. Trng., Mktg.
Res., ePrsonnel, Production and Pur-
chasing.
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1969:
Michigan Department of Civil Serv-
ice, Lansing, Mich., and statewide: All
degree levels and all majors 'for bank-
ing, Biol., Cartography, Computer areas,
Insurance, Library, Mgmt., Trng., Mktg.
Res.,rMerchandising, Personnel, Pro-
duction, Publ. Admin., Publ. Relations,
Purchasing, Writing, Statistics, Social
Work and Recreation.
These are the final interview visits
for Spring 1969. Please call 764-7460.
Mrs. Wiers for further resources for
you job'hunting, o let us know if
your plans are complete.
(Continued on Page 10) f

i
-- _.. :

IWflLI II'ICT

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Mon., March 24-Noon Luncheon-25c
PROF. MONFRED KOCHEN
Mathematical Biologist at the Mental Health Research Institute
"Social I mplicationis of' i nformation
Technology"
Tues., March 25-Noon Luncheon
MARK SCHREIBER:

I

TECHNICOLOR' PANAVISION'

"How Not To Be a Student Leader"

Ii

Program Information 2-6264
WATCH FOR
"THE SERGEANT"

"FROM RUSSIA
WITH LOVE"
at 1, 5:10, 9:20
"THUN DERBALL"
at 2:55, 7:05
DON'T MISS EVEN 1 MIN.
OF THE ACTION!_

.DIAL 5-6290
3rd WEEK
Chaplinesque.
"Robertson displays a
flair for humor."
Letter, Perfect..
' "CHARLY; is a sensit
intelligent film."
-CARROLL,
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE
BEST ACTOR-
CLIFF ROBERTSON
TECHNICOLOR
TECHNISCOPE;
Science Fiction.
'Robertson gives an
earnest performance
It's science fiction
without gadgets, a
horror film without'
thrills."
-CANBY, T

Read and Use Daily Class ifieds
Saturday and Sunday
'THE BLUE ANiGEL
-TIME
ive/r
se
NEWS
MARLEN'E EMIL
DIETRICH JANNINGS
Directed by JOSEF VON STERNBERG, 1930
"The film that launched the Dietrich legend. A pro-
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classic of sudo-masochism." *
7:00 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8S71 75c AUDITORIUM
IMES

5 Foreign Study
Pro~a m~s of
n oSyraCu.se Uni-Vers ty
1969 Surmmer Sessions
SCHOOL OF ART..-----------.. ....FLORENCE
SCHOOL OF MUSIC .._-.-.......,SWITZERLAND
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION .... LONDON
DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY -.... .MUNICH
ITALIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE...-FLORENCE*
*Undergraduate credit only.
Write for brochure:
Foreign Study Programs of Syracuse University
335 Comstock Avenue, Syracuse, New York 13210
OPENS SUNDAY!

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Professional Theatre Program
BEST MUSICAL-ALL AWARDS
N.Y. DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE/TONY AWARD/
OUTER CIRCLE/VARIETY POLL/SAT. REVIEW
DAVID ATKINSON
PATRICIA MARANO
in
("THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM")
March 24-25 Hill
8:30 P.M. Auditorium

0
0
7

Re-released thru
TECHNICOLOR United Artists

I

LYSISTRA
by
Aristophai
University Players
Department of Speech

PANAVISION*TECHNICOLOR
: Re-released thru United Artists
Re-released thru
TECHNICOLOR United Artists
kTA'
nes
12
VI.

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7
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4
4
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4

ELECTRA RECORDING ARTIST
DAVID ACKLE S
Will Perform at
flC~[f~flpp7 [1J RK

Truebloo
April 9-
8:00 P.!

Sunday Matinee

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