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March 14, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-14

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Page Three

Friday, March 14, 1969
RUSS GIBB presents in Detroit
KILLER SHOW{

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TONIGHT and SATURDAY
BARRY
O'NEILL
guitar, dulcimer, concertina, banjo

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1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

FROM ENGLAND

Demonstrations hit
role of research

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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
JOHN MAYALL and SAVOY BROWN
Blues Bands

AND

Admission $5.00

8:30 P.M.-l :00 A.M.

SUNDAY-THE FROST AND THE TRAIN
7-11, $1.75
THE GRANDE BALLROOM
Grand River at Beverly, 1 block south of Joy
DETROIT

traditional ballads and love songs
of Ireland, Scotland, England,
Canada, United States, 1 890's

ROGER
REN WICK

By TOM MILLER
College Press Service
WASHINGTON - Schools
ranging in size from Pennsyl-
vania's Haverford College to the
University of California held
seminars, symposia, workshops,
letter-writing campaigns and
Just plain lectures on the na-
tional science self-assessment
day last week,as part of a na-
tionwide effort to bring the role
of the scientist in society to pub-
lic notice.
The action was conceived and
carried o u t by chapters of a
newly formed activist group,
Science A c t i o n Coordinating
Committee (SACC). Officially,
the day was to protest the mis-
uses of science and technology
in society, but at many colleges
and universities the topic broad-
,,

featuring Barry's latest hit: "Sweeny Todd the Barber")

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ened to other disciplines a n d
their relation to science.
SACC was flexible about what
could be done at different cam-
puses. Some local groups chose
to call a "strike" by scientists
doing research work, to signify
a "vote of no-confidence in the
government's ability to m a k e
wise and humane use of scien-
tific and technical knowledge."
Specifically emphasized was the
development by government of
overkill defense systems at the
expense of social and environ-
mental problems.
Other schools had what would
be called a "research stoppage,"
which SACC leaders Joel Fei-
genbaum and Ira Rubenzahl
(of MIT) say is an effort to halt
work "to make a personal com-
mitment to reforming a set of
government policies that have
resulted in the growing power
and influence of the military-
industrial complex."
Many scientists have decided,
in the years since they created
the hydrogen bomb, that their
influence should extend beyond
the laboratory. Their j o b, as
they see it, is not just to see that
something is technically func-
tional, but also to see that it is
not prostituted by the govern-
ment or injurious to the popu-
lation as a whole. The day of
dialogue held last week indi-
cates a larger number of them
believe this than most people
guessed.
At Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, where the idea for
the day began, panel discussions
were held throughout March 4,
and activities w e r e scheduled
through the entire week. The
"Responsibilities of Intellectu-
als" discussion drew the most
interest. Participating were ling-
uist Noam Chomsky and repre-
sentatives from the RAND cor-
poration and from the Union of
Concerned Scientists.
Major proposals came out of
MIT workshops. Moas t signifi-
cant was one banning academ-
ic credit for theses done as class-
ified work. It was estimated that
about half of MIT's 7400 stu-
dents participated in the day's
discussions.
But at the Argonne National
Laboratory near Chicago, 80 of
the 1200 scientists staged a
counter-demonstration by work-
ing double shifts to make up for
research lost in the stoppage.
Local women handed out cook-
ies to t h e counter-demonstra-
tors.
See PROTESTS, Page 7
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily'ues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
IjQaok0
605 E. William 767-1573
'YANKEE DOODLE-
I . DANDY
James Cagney, Walter Huston
Mar. 13, Thurs.-8 & 10 P.M.
Mar. 14, 15, Fri. & Sat.-I A.M.
75c downstairs
SGC
ELECTIONS
VOTE
MARH 1ad 1

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE APOLLO 9 ASTRONAUTS landed safely in the
calm Atlantic.
The touchdown brought to a finish the most daring
American spaceflight yet, and cleared the way for a moon
landing as soon as all the data is in.
Space officials at Houston called the flight "as success-
ful as any of us could ever wish for."
During the 10 day flight, the astronauts tested the
"Lunar Excursion Module" for the first time in space. Astro-
nauts Scheickart and McDivitt transferred from the command
module to the attached lunar module three times. On the
third transfer, they separated from the command module,
and flew the landing craft more than 100 miles from the
mother ship.
They then linked up again, as astronauts returning
from the moon's surface will do.
Apollo 10, to fly sometime between now and July, could
be a moon landing flight. However, space officials may decide
to attempt one more training flight before a moon landing
is attempted.
THE VIET CONG'S DELEGATE to the Paris peace
talks blasted President Nixon's threat of "appropriate
response" to the current Communist offensive.
Tran Buu Kiem, the National Liberation Front's foreign
minister, said the Americans would bear "full responsibility
for the consequences." He did not elaborate.
All four participants agreed there was not progress
during the session of the talks. The next formal session will
be next Thursday.
THE NAVY'S eight-week inquiry into the capture of
the USS Pueblo ended.
Cmdr. Lloyd M. Bucher ended the testimony by saying
unequivocally that "at the time of the seizure we did not
have.the power to resist."
Bucher added in a brief written statement he accepts
sole responsibility for the loss of secret documents. He crit-
icized the Navy, however, for not providing him with an
adequate system of destroying secret items.
Bucher also .recommended the U.S. Code of Conduct for
war prisoners be reviewed. Currently, the code forbids a cap-
tured American from revealing to his captors anything but
basic identification information, and prohibits prisoners from
doing anything that would embarass the U.S., government.
Bucher was criticized for violating the code when he
signed a false confession in order to obtain the release of
his crew.
" * .
A BROTHER of James Earl Ray said Ray told him
that he wasn't alone in the King assassination.
John Larry Ray said he discussed this with his brother
in his jail cell in Memphis, Saturday night, two days before he
entered a plea of guilty.
Percy Foreman, Ray's attorney, said he wouldn't agree
to pursue any conspiracy angle "because it would make
Jimmie sound like a hired killer, rather than someone who
may have killed King because he thought he was a Com-
munist or different with his beliefs."
BRITAIN'S STRUGGLING.ECONOMY took another
jolt.
Prices on the London stock market dropped sharply after
the announcement of a sharply increased trade deficit last
month. Government securities fell in the first moments
after the Board of Trade released its February report.
European financial markets also reacted swiftly to the
news. The pound fell on foreign exchanges in London, Paris,
Frankfurt and Zurich, where trading was hectic.
Some specialists in London were questioning Prime
Minister Harold Wilson's handling of the devaluation of the
pound in November 1967. This was supposed to get the
country's trade figures into surplus by this year.
One analyst in Zurich said the announced trade deficit
was "fairly convincing proof" that the devaluation had fail-
ed.
* . .
ISRAELI AND EGYPTIAN forces fired artillery and
rockets at each other across the Suez Canal.
The artillery battles raged the length of the 103-mile
canal. Cairo radio also said Israel rocket helicopters were
shot down.
The initial outbreak was stopped after almost two

hours by UN observers. However, within an hour, both sides
were blazing away again.
In Cairo, the Egyptian government announced the ap-
pointment of Maj. Gen. Ahmed Ismed Aly as new chief of
staff of Egypt's armed forces. He replaced Lt. Gen. Abdel
Moneim Riad, who was killed in fighting along the canal
last Sunday.

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OPENS FRIDAY !

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Professional Theatre Program
Presents
by the Authors of "FIDDLER ON THE ROOF!"

STEAK and EGGS
with hashbrown potatoes,
toast and jelly
$1.10
STEVE'S LUNCH
just west of SAS
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS, TOO

6L4L7)Os
aI,,OW
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U OF D CARNY
March 14-16
Rides-Games-Movies
Side Shows-Midway
AND
FREE LIVE SHOWS
BOB SEGER
SYSTEM
8 P.M., Friday, Mar. 14

TOM1

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PIqlhoJZ

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