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March 14, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-14

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Page Two
-film festival-
Night of the winners?

THE MICHI

An end t

By BRUCE HENSTELL
The third night of tho Ann
Arbor Film Festival may well
turn out to be the night of the
winners. It was a night of easy
and occassionally serious view-
ing, even if it lagged in parts.
Several of the films were
montages of images, far from
a new or even necessarily in-
teresting technique. But in sev-
eral cases the juxtaposition
called attention to the obivous
intelligence of the filmmaker.
Tom Palazzolo, whose The Bride
Stripped Bare - a curious and
often funny vision of Mayor
Daley encountering Art in Chi-
cago'p city center which was
shown the first night of the fes-
tival, returned with 0. By rights,
with his use of images as mun-
dane as a marching band and a
circus, the film shouldn't have
worked. But in the midst of the
rapid fantasy of images came a
dold feeling of reality - real-
ity presented in picturing a
sense of grotesque.

Section 11 used the same kind
of imgary but presented a dis-
jointedness that riveted the eye
to a series of appearing and,
then dissolving forms. Here
again the viewer was caught in
an almost icy intelligence.
Moonblock which used the pure
forms of white and black was
overly long but again it was
obviously intelligent.
Less interesting was a short
film about the MC-5. It was
several different performances
of the group strung together and
shot in fast motion. One is
tempted to say that the film-
maker sure put one over on
them in picturing a pure silly-
ness (as opposed to a creative
absurdity). But that probably
wasn't the case.
One of the more amusing films
was Eight. In it a kindly man
drivesand walks about observ-
ing children. At the point we
suspect pederasty he is attack-
ed by some junior Green Berets.
And far from what they expect-

ed in their "play," he is actually
shot, and apparently dies
slumped over the horn of his
car. The children stare, throw
their guns to the ground and
run like hell. Whereupon o u r
hero arises, makes a mark in a
little book and drives away, a
No War Toys sticker prominent-
ly displayed on his car.
Kenneth Valentine, whose ex-
cellent In This Room was shown
Wednesday night, was less suc-
cessful with Haiku for Hamlet
which lacked the inner coher-
ance of the earlier film. Holly-
wood, Here I Am by another lo-
cal filmmaker, Bill Clark, suf-
fered from the one great sins of
filmmaking - inability to make
enough cuts. It was funny, but
its central strand of humor was
almost destroyed by length and
over-extension of the joke: a
projectionist both dreaming of
and making movies.
James Broughton's The Bed.
was one of the most delightful
films at last year's festival and
won several awards both here
and elsewhere. But his entry
this year, Nuptiae lacked both
the wit and grace of The Bed.
It became so watery that it cast
doubt on validity of \Brough-
ton's basic vision. Nuptiae was
about the eternality and beau-
ity of marriage while The Bed
was about the eternality and
beauty of sex. But where The
Bed possessed a fine sense of
humor to carry it over its pain-
fully simple point, Nuptiae was
just simple. And the simple, in
this case, is not necessarily the
beautiful.

By STEVE KOPPMAN,
More than 1500 students
overflowed the Union Ballroom
last night to hear Joan Baez
and David Harris talk about a
new kind of society.
Drawn by the reputation of
the widely-acclaimed folk sing-
er and social crusader, the crowd
was urged to work to bring the
day when 'the words 'oppressor'
and 'oppressed' will disappear
from the earth."
"You and I are going to have
a revolution," Miss Baez said,
"but I don't mean the tradi-
tional type of revolution. Re'vo-
lution means change - real
change of direction - not just
someone new carrying the gun.
"I don't think being violent
is being revolutionary-I think
being violent is being reaction-
ary. Our revolution is going to
be when you and I realize that
every single, human being on
the face of this earth is sacred."
Miss Baez declared that it is
our complicity which perpetu-
ates the gigantic military estab-
lishment and the attitude of
nationalism, w h i c h together
make war inevitable.
"The military is an enormous
giant with a stranglehold on the
world. We keep this giant alive.
We keep militarism alive with
our II-S's-your II-S 3s some-
one else's M-15 " she said,
"Our schools teach national-
ism-that's the doctrine that a
piece of property is worth more
than a human life.
"I don't think," she continued,
"that you can learn to be a
good American, a good Chinese,
.or a good Peruvian, and still be
a human being with any idea of
brotherhood."

letters

To the Editor:
When I read the review by Kirk Hampton on Donald Hall's
reading I was reminded of a very relevant quotation from Randall
Jarrell: "Poetry is not unread because it is obscure. It is obscure
because it is unread." The reviewer has no business ignorantly,
condescendingly condemning Hall's work. He does not seem to
understand that contemporary poets have realized, that intellec-
tual abstraction is only meaningful and evocative insofar as it
refers to meaningful specifics of experience. That is why poets
like Hall and Roethke have been so committed to the image apart
from such commentary-poetry is the attempt to get as close to
the world as possible, not to construct the intellectual generaliza-
tions that can be drawn from that world.
The reviewer also does not seem-to understand that our inner
world is just as real and important as the outer (though even
that simplistic division is somewhat schizophrenic). Fantasy is
only another, just as vivid, reality. The reviewer seems to suffer
from the American concept of the tangible, the reasoned, as the
truly important. It is the inner world of loves and fears with which
poetry is concerned.'
The best poets are those who enter territories, depths which
most people cannot reach. If Hall or Rilke are difficult it is not for
obscurity; it is because they have attained a clarity, an in-sight
most. people do not have. They move into the places that lie too
deep for intellectualization. But there is also no question but
that, to many sensitive and intellectual people who read contem-
porary poetry, Hall's poems are very moving and comprehensible.
But poetry is in the deep experience, not the intellectual con-
nections and platitudes.
Lawrence Russ

r

11
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GAN DAILY Friday, March 14, 1969
lectures
o1 ppressionmBaez LITTLE CLUB
In a biting attack on the "When it ceases to benefit
schools, Miss Baez, called our men's lives, it should no longer
educational system "a castration be obeyed."fthe Six of Spad s
process which takes away our Replying to a student who f 0 Uring e Xof p des
dreams, and tells us what we questioned how great corpora-
can't do. tions could be divested of their
"The saddest thing I've seen power without violence, Harris
in our educational system is that replied, "We provide the power
98 per cent of the people there for these institutions. The real
are there because they're scared power is not in -giving orders,
to be anywhere else or they but in refusing to accept orders.
don't think they can do any- "The power of General Mo-
thing else. tors will end when the workers
"But the river of life," she show up and tell the bosses ofFriday,
said, "is flowing somewhere out.. GM they're fired,'' he said.
side the classroom. I don't think "The day isn't near yet when9-2P .
you can just look through that the words 'oppressor' and 'op-
river and find your own private pressed' will disappear, but it
puddle, because that river of life only gets closer with our work.
is filled with the broken arms, And if that day comes, we'll
broken legs and broken heads of have to push it up with our EE
other huiman beings. We're go.. backs."
ing to have to do something Harris and Miss Baez are on
about it." a four day tour in Michigan.
Her husband, David Harris,'
founder of Resistance and for-
mer student body president of with the
Stanford, spoke with Miss Baez.I "Hour of the Wolf"
"Man gets what he does-not
what he talks about. You and I
must stand up and refuse to be DOOR PRIZE
a butcher of your brothers
around the world. We live in a
society that's made human life Each Dance Ticket entitles you
dispensable," he said.aU to 33/% discount off list price
Harris expects to begin a of any record purchase made
three-year prison term this June after March 14, 1969 at
for refusing induction.-9
Referring particularly to draft
resistance, Harris declared that Sylvar a Solid State DATE: March 14, 1969-Friday
"the law is not sacred-it does STEREO PHONOGRAPH TIME; 9-1
not exist unto itself. It is a tool, with GARRARD Changer PLACE: Newman Center, RECORD STORES
It derives its legitimacy from.331 Th
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Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
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"DAZZLING! once you see it, you'll never again picture
Romeo & Juliet' quite the way you did before!" - LIFE

t

CINEMA GUILD Presents

THE SEVENTH
ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL
MARCH 11-16, 1969
Architecture and Design Auditorium
SCREENINGS at 7:00, 9:00 and 11:00 P.M. (excluding Saturday)
SATURDAY MATINEE at 3:00 P.M.

..L q" .

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