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January 12, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-12

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Sunday, January 13, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sunday, January 13, 1969 IHE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

South
CAN THO, Vietnam (CPS)-
While the National Liberation
Front runs good and effective
schools for children in Vietnam,
the government's school system
is run by the rich for the rich.
The densely populated delta of
Can Tho Is a good example ...
Control over the poor is main-
tained by the limited amount
of classroom space, the location
of the schools, and the kind of
education offered.
"We drop propaganda leaf-
lets all over the place, but- we
haven't taught the people, how
to read," says Dr. D. J. Hayes,
an education specialist in the
U.S. pacification effort in the
delta. Dr. Hayes, with four years
experience in Vietnam, is con-
sidered by many here to know
more about rural Vietnamese
schools than any other Ameri-
can.
Only one-third of the delta's
school-age children are in
school. Two-thirds of these are
in the first three grades. Thus
while 268;000 children' enrolled
in the first grade for the 1967-
68 school year, only 2500 en-
rolled in the twelfth grade..Most
of the students were pushed out
along the way because their
parents cannot afford books,
selool supplies, and s c h o o 1
clothes. Nor can they afford the
special tutors needed to prime
them for exams or the bribes
needed to pay off officials if the
son can't pass the exams.
One of the largest dropout

U.S. AID BUCKS THE SYSTEM
Vietnam: Education for the ri

rates, twenty-four percent, oc-
curs between the third and the
fourth grades. One reason for
this is that the U.S. economic
aid program in the delta went
into an accelerated school build-
ing program for the first three
years-but extra class r o o m s
were not built for grades four
and five. Three years of school
is, according to education ex-
perts here, just short of "func-
tional literacy" (the ability to
read newspapers).
Only the rich make it through
Vietnam's school system. High
schools are located only in large
population centers, and the rur-
al poor cannot afford to send
their children to these schools.
Good elementary teachers are
assigned to the cities where the
rich live.
Most rural teachers have had
only five years of education
themselves plus a three-month
teacher training program. Thus,
rural children, even if their par-
ents can afford to send them to
high school, can seldom pass
the high school entrance exams.
A special problem is the edu-
cation of the Cambodian minor-
ity. Most ethnic Cambodian
children do not speak Vietna-
mese - or at best speak it very
poorly. The Vietnamese teacher,
with an already overcrowded
school, turns many of the Cam-
bodian children away.
"Eighty-five percent of t h e
Cambodian children don't go to
school," claims Dr. Hayes. Text-

books aren't e v e n written in
Cambodian.
Beginning with t h e 1969
school year, Dr. Hayes hopes to
start a major program for the
Cambodians. The first hurdle -
allowing some of the classes to
be taught in Cambodian - has
already been passed.
Dr. Hayes' concern for edu-
cating the rural masses led him
to obtain textbooks t h a t the
NLF teachers are using.
"I wanted to find out why
their schools were so effective,"
he said.
He found a skillfully prepared
set of textbooks designed both
to teach the three R's and to
propagandize.
The teacher's handbook on
writing, for example, tells
teachers to write the lessons on
the board when the students are
present so theycan observe and
duplicate the motions.
The lessons in the children's
textbooks begin with very simple
material, usually aimed at mak-
ing the child a better citizen,
anti develop into political les-
sons. The reading lessons in
Book include:
"Remember to pull up the
grass but don't pull up the pars-
ley."
"The little girl is preparing
tea for the old pedicab driver."
"Now Tam is joining the para-
military self-defense; therefore
his parents are very happy."
"We all demonstrate against
the cruel Americans."
1r

From the first grade arith-
metic book:
"Little Oanh studied hard, so
her mother gave her five can-
dies. She gave two candies to
her friend. How many candies
did Oanh have left?"
"Valiant Nguyen Van Be,
American-killer, was 14 years
old. At his first raid he killed
seven Americans, the second
battle he killed three more
Americans. How many Amer-
icans did he kill?"
From the writing lessons:
"'I know how to fight the
Americans too, Uncle!' said the
little boy.
'So, how do you fight the
Americans?' I chuckled asking
him. I hardly believed he told
me. 'The American GI carried
me. I was not happy, but he

continued to carry me. I pick-
ed up the filthy sand and put
it into the barrel of his rifle.' "
In the South, one of the
greatest needs is for vocational
training for children who have
never had a chance to go to
school. Today, thousands of
young boys depend on shining
shoes, watching cars, and pimp-
ing for foreign soldiers. After
the war, these children will be
without jobs.
The USAID (Agency for In-
ternational Development) pro-
gram makes no provision for
these kids; the Americans have
gone along with the courses the
Saigon government has set up
for the rich and nothing is
being done for those who really
need the help.
All existing vocational train-

h only
ing programs, for example, re-
quire their students to have a
minimum of five years of ed-
ucation at the time of entrance
into vocational school. i
Four years ago a large voca-
tional training school was start-
ed with U.S. money in Can Tho.
The foundation and walls were
built and the roof put on one
of the three buildings. Now,
more than half completed, the
buildings have been abandoned,'
the wooden window sills are rot-
ting and the buildings are going
into disrepair.
"They say we're going to start
working on it in February," said
one USAID advisor. "But even
if it really is finished, it won't
be for the kids who really need
it. It will only be for those who
have had five years of school-
ing."

Ho's former quarters become
visiting spots for Viet envoys

P A R I S (P) - The peace- one of their entourage explain-
makers from North Vietnam ed, "for our people to avoid
and the Viet Cong have been lives of normality while our land
hitting a Ho Chi Minh trail in and our compatriots are suffer-
Paris. ing."
The wispy-bearded president Therefore the bright lights
of North Vietnam was here first and glitter of Paris are things
in 1914, then in the 1920s, fin- to shun.
ally in 1946. He was one of the One favorite outing that at-
founders of the French Com- tracts many of them - espec-
munist party and used to at- ially among the young officials
tend jamborees of the now-de- - is to spend parts of their
funct Communist Internationale weekends and vacations visiting
as a French party delegate. Ho's old quarters.
He once worked as a photo-
Ho's old stamping grounds and grapher's retoucher and put an
dwelling places have, for many advertisement in a Communist
of his devoted followers, taken paper saying: -
on the quality of shrines. "You who want a living sou-
And with delays in the four- venir of your parents; have your
way peace efforts, some dele- photographs retouched at Nguy-
gates from North Vietnam and en Ai Ouoc's. Beautiful portrait
the southern Viet Cong have and frame for 45 francs."
had time on their hands. At the time, Ho's name was
None has his wife with him. Nguyen Ai Quoc, meaning
"It's almost a point on honor," "Nguyen the patriot."

COMMUNICATE
WITH A CHILD
Learn from him and let him learn from
YOU.
Seek him out by calling the U of M
tutorial project. 663-8607, P.M.'s or

769-4738

late

eves.

or by stopping in

2547

SAB 1-5

Info:662-6264
bad cops
are good
cops- and
then
there's

HELD OVER
4th WEEK

Hanoi and Viet Cong envoys,
led by Xuan Thuy and T r an
Buu Kierm, also do a lot of
reading. They organize cultural
occasions where folk-dancing
and singing are highly popular.
They play volleyball to keep fit
- the Hanoi delegation's head-
quarters in the suburb of
Choisy-le-Roi, one hour's drive
out of Paris, has a court.
Their villa's owned by t h e
French Communist party. The
North Vietnamese team of about
60 live almost like a commune.
The top brass of the Viet Cong-
group live in a villa at Ver-
rieres-les-Buissons, southwest of
Paris. Having arrived huch lat-
er and more hurriedly than their
northern friends, their accom-
modation problems were more
difficult. The rest of the dele-
gation lives within half a mile
in the residential district.
Almost all speak French.
One of the unrecorded battles
going on between the Commun-
ist-inclined delegations and
their rivals from Saigon is for
the minds of the 45,000 Viet-
namese who have settled in
France. Vietnamese students en-
rolled in French universities are
targets for their attentions, too.
Some of these younger, uncom-
mitted Vietnamese have been
spotted at both Saigon and at
Hanoi functions.
On the whole, the rule among
the men from Hanoi and the
Viet Cong is to trust, no non-
Communists.
The most complete
supply of
NEW and USED TEXTS
and PAPERBACKS
is at the
Student Book. Service

Shows at:
and 915

1 :00-3:00-5-00-7:10

Inews today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
PRESIDENT JOHNSON will pass the diplomatic
initiative in the Middle East to his successor when he
makes his final statement to the Soviet Union next week.
Sources said yesterday that the reply drafted by the State
Department and awaiting Johnson's signature will keep the
door open for talks with the Soviets, concerning their Middle
East peace proposal.
Except for asking clarification on a number of points,
it was reported the U.S. reply will merely "keep the ball roll-
ing," without committing the country to any course of action.
The Johnson administration will hold informal talks on the
Soviet proposal with Britain, France, Israel and certain Arab
countries. The proposal, condemned by Israel as an imposed
settlement, was described by U.S. sources as "not a basis for
settlement in the Middle East but a move in the right direc-
tion."
ISRAELI FIGHTERS attacked Arab command posi-
tions across the Jordan River cease fire line yesterday.
Jet fighters hammered commando outposts in Jordan
in reprisal for an alleged rocket attack on an Israeli army
vehicle. No Israeli casualties were reported.
A spokesman in Amman, Jordan's capital, said the fighter
attack inflicted damage but no one was killed.
Israeli military sources said the jets later supported
ground forces in a two-hour mortar and artillery battle three
miles north of the Dead Sea.
COMMUNIST FORCES IN VIETNAM shelled 28 air-
fields and army camps in the heaviest wave of overnight
attacks since the Nov. 1 bombing halt, military authorities
reported today.
Jn the second day of unusually heavy rocket and mortar
assaults speculation grew that the enemy command had
ordered military pressure increased to emphasize _Hanoi's
displeasure with the deadlock of the Paris peace talks.
The attacks were concentrated on outposts and towns in
the thickly populated Mekong Delta south of Saigon and on
American and South Vietnamese camps guarding the north-
western approaches to the capital.
PRESIDENT JOHNSON has apparently given up
hope of a committment from President-elect Nixon on the
continuation of the 10 per cent surtax.
Scheduling of the State of the Union Message for next
Tuesday indicates the President has given up hope of any
statement from Nixon on whether to recommend an exten-
sion of the surtax, the Associated Press reported yesterday.
Sources indicated the President wants to submit a near-
ly balanced budget for the fiscal year starting July 1 but
said it would be difficult for him to achieve such a balance
without a continuation of the surtax. The tax brings in about
$12 billion a year.
FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK, announced Friday
it was increasing interest rates on personal loans. Other
banks indicated they may follow suit.
First National, New York's largest bank, will increase
interest rates one-fourth of one per cent, a bank spokesman
said. John J. Reynolds,'senior vice president of the bank said
the move was made necessary by the increased cost of money
generally and by an increase in operating expenses.
The action was the second time in a week that First Na-
tional took the lead in raising key interest rates. T u e s d a y
morning it announced a one-fourth point rise, to a record
7 per cent, in the prime rate-the amount charged on loans
to corporate borrowers.
*MADMARVIN IS BACK * m
at the Vth Forum. Thur., Fri., Sat., Sun. at 11:00 P.M.
stop by ...you wont be disappointed.

LISTEN HERSCHEL
LISTEN HERSCHEL'
LISTEN HERSCHEL
Every noon Monday-Friday we're dishing up
SUP
also onion rolls, sweet rolls, coffee, coke
at
You can have whatever you want as long as it's bean
or Cuernauaca Chicken
-The mgmt.
a a a a... . a a . a.9 .. .

AS!IJE IYT "
A Su6SESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES TECHNICOLORfROM WARNER BROS.-SEYEN ARTS
Next attraction: -"YELLOW SUBMARINE"

1

* * separate adm ission

I

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PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM,

I

MARCH ON
WASHINGTON
Jn.18, 19 20
1. Ann Arbor Movement Center
2. Liberation Classes
3. Counter-Inauguration March
4. Counter-Inauguration Ball
BUS TICKETS NOW
2527 SAB 1-6 P.M.
Phone 761 -3252
or 769-1400
Sponsored by
Mobilization Committee to
End the Vietnam War

rr-e.n..%moo

-Wwwo

I

"ARTISTRY& EROTICISM"
Cue Magazine NY imes
"THE MOVIE HAS THE CAREFUL TEMPO OF A MINUET,
WHICH COUNTERPOINTS ITS DESPERATE EROTICISM!"
N.Y Times

I

OPENS TOMORROW!
IMOGENE "ECHANTN
, q V pIMO ENE r pst -Chapman . Y1ews
"~A SMASH 1111" COA lRE BES
.-ife M1&g...adel, IWorld rt V
KING :.:
.stt 1 M -

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6
ommum

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"SURELY THIS IS
AMONG THE MOST
EROTIC OF MOVIES!
The movie's artistry
raises the subject
matter to the level
of personality
exploration. THE
EXPERIENCE IS
BIZARRELY
CDMPELLING h
Cue Magazine

6rA HIGHLY EROTIC
FILM! IT SHOULD
BECOME A CAUSE
CELEBRE WITH THE
WHATEVER-TURNS-
YOU-ON SET! Glenda
Jackson is really
tremendous!
ENGROSSING!
OFFBEAT AND
DIFFERENT!99
WINS Radio

G MICHIGAN

" MUST IT
I APPEN
ONCE
TO
EVERYONE?

directby ALAN SCINEIDER.
WITH
RAND KATIE SERMAN
AIA4;: LL 4FLI I O

Cdi~biA
piCTUIES.
PRESENTS
AdOOOMO
ROcktjGK'
OSkARWERNER
ARbbARA ERRiS
A s JkII #

THIS WEEK 7 FILMS
a three hour cinematic trip
f HUEY
the story of Huey Newton and the Black Panthers.
# LISTEN, WHITEY
Black reaction to the assassination of Dr. King.
" WEST AFRICA, ANOTHER VIET NAM?
Feature length. The guerrilla movement in West
Africa against the Portugese. Including an actual
attack on the Occupying Colonial Army! "This is THE
movie on guerrilla warfare"-Peter 'Werbe, editor,
Fifth Estate.
" HUELGA!
Cesar Chavez narrates. The California Grape Strike,

"LEAVES NOTHING TO 5 i"SEXUAL AND INVECTIVE
THE IMAGINATION! 1 l1 Vb AND PERFORMANCES OF
GOES TOO FAR!9 I 1 MEMORABLE QUALITY!"
N.Y. Dailv News A RI7ARRF MODFRN DRAMA OF A MAN AND TWO WOMEN N.Y. Post

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