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February 26, 1969 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-26

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday,* February 26, 1969

F'a g T w T H E M I C I G A D A I Y W d n e s a y; F e b u ary 2 6, 1 9 6

records
Flying Dutchman may change your mind

By R. A. PERRY
Wagner, perhaps like Jean
Luc-Godard (if you will pardon
t h e comparison), is an artist
either hotly detested or enthu-
siastically embraced; s e 1 d o m
does he elicit a middle-road re-
sponse of disinterest. Many mu-
sic lovers would like to apply
Wagner's estimation of Meyer-
beer to Wagner himself: "an ir-
resistibly mongrel, historico-ro-
mantic, diabolico-religious, emo-
tionally fickle, bigoted-voluptu-
ous, frivolously sacred, myster-
loso - shameless hodge - podge."
Others w o u 1 d sincerely agree
with Baudelaire when he wrote
to Wagner "I owe to you the
greatest musical pleasure I have
ever experienced."
To those who know Wagner
only by exerpted orchestral pas-
sages and who view the prospect
of sitting through the Ring
cycle (lest making the voyage to
the Mecca called Bayreuth) a
horror of unending boredom, I
would suggest acquaintance with
the early and magnificent opera
The Flying Dutchman. A recent-
lY released set by Angel (SCL-
3730) with a fine cast and even
finer engineering makes this en-
counter an exhilirating affair.

The plot of The Flying Dutch-
man deals with the mental tor-
ment of existential wandering, a
mythic Western horror of time,
the sacrifice of love, and Release
only through death, which, if
love be true, may be a dying into
Life. Wagner's libretto evoked
many sources, primarily Heine's
Memoirs of Herr von Schnabele-
wopski and Eugene Sue's The
Wandering Jew. A y e a r after
reading Heine, Wagner himself
experienced a terrific storm at
sea that activated the literature
he was reading into a personal
reality. That storm is scored in-
to the opera itself. Wagner
wrote: "a feeling of indescrib-
able contentment came over me
when the enormous granite wialls
echoed w i t h the calls of the
crew . . . the sharp rhythm of
the call struck me like a mighty
consoling omen, and soon shap-
ed itself into the theme of the
sailors' song in my Flying Dutch-
man." One thinks of Turner rid-
ing trains with his head out the
window and later translating
these blurry visual experiences
into his luminescent paintings.
Libretto and score grew out of
Wagner in two years, and the
final w o r k was completed in

1841. It was not, however, until
1843 that the opera was present-
ed in Dresden, and then to a
grumpy press that preferred
Wagner's easier Rienzi. In time
it has come to be recognized as a
dramatic masterpiece that ex-
plores with vivid intensity the
psychological flux of its char-
acters' minds as well as music-
ally invokes the larger mythos
in which these characters play
out their personal destinies.
In estimating Angel's new re-
cording, which uses the original
Dresden version thus restoring
several "traditional" cuts, I
have to first mention that the
stereo effects employed are not
only enormously successful, but
seemingly essential. The engin-
eers have enabled us to visualize
t h e Dutchman's ship creeping
closer to Daland's and to see the
sweep of the waves moving
across the stereo seascapes. Cer-
tain effects, such as the creak-
ing of anchor ropes, or the click-
ing whirr of the girls' spinning
wheels, add immensely to the
dramatic visualization of scene.
Happily, the recording stands
not merely upon its stereoisms
but upon its excellent singers as
well. Theo Adam provides a truly

tormented Dutchman who con-
vinces us of his endless trials by
appropriately paying great heed
to the dramatic exigencies of the
text. Thus in his opening mono-
log ("Die First ist um"), Adam
does not so much captivate us
by the richness of his bass voice
as by the sensitive reading of his
lines. The transformation within
this monolog from resignation to
hope to defiance becomes vital
and real. Although Adam at
times loses vocal command when
asked to sing quietly, he main-
tains the high dramatic inten-
sity and reality of his r o 1 e
throughout the opera.
Martti Talvela, who sings the
role of Daland, seems to be ev-
erywhere in today's internation-
al music scene, performing in
both oratoria a n d opera with'
increasing frequency. (I heard
his profondo voice in Cleveland
last spring in the Verdi Req-
uiem). His enactment here of
the Norwegian sea captain de-
sirous of the Dutchman's treas-
ure I found to be not only ex-
ceedingly well controlled, but
also dramatically believable at
all times.
The leading female role, that
of Daland's daughter Senta who

sacrifices herself for the Dutch-
man, thus releasing him from
his eternal wandering, is sung
by twenty-seven-year-old Anja
SilJa. Silia provides no special
asset to the performance - her
voice constricts in t h e upper
registers and s h e suggests no
reserve power (a sine qua non of
Wagnerian singing) - but she
is, at least, also aware ofi the
theatrical reality that hallmarks
this recording endeavor, and
contributes accordingly.
Otto Klemperer, who conducts
this Angel performance, is not
known for spontaneity or flex-
ibility, yet his supreme control
provides a needed balance here.
That is, the dramatic thrust and
fervor of the score never is al-

!owed to sprawl and sink to mel-
odrama, yet the rhythmic pulse
is maintained at all times.
Klemperer, in whose Beethoven
and Brahms I find coursing no-
ble blood that is 90% embalm-
ing fluid, builds enormously ex-
citing crescendos of power in
the storm sequences, allows the
perfect amount of swagger to the
sailors' chorus, and - keeps the
excellent soloists always- for-
ward-moving, while -allowing
enough time for the psycholo-
gical validity of the r o 1e s to
emerge.
If you 1 o v e Wagner, you'll
certainly like this Angel set; if
you hate Wagner, t h i s Flying
Dutchman may change your
mind.

A ONE-DAY EXHIBITION & SALE
Graphics
presented by
LONDON GRAFICA ARTS
Publishers of contemporary printmakers
More than 400 lithographs, etchings,
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including works by: PICASSO, DURER,
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Also MANUSCRIPTS AND MAPS
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DAILY OFFIC-IAL BULLETIN
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Showings
Daily
1:30
4:00
7:00
9:35

BOB SEGE'R
SYSTEM
Original Charging Rhinoceros of Soul
T ea gard en and Van Winkle
Fruit of the Loom
Friday, February 28
8-12 midnight
EMU BOWEN FIELOHOUSE

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
tal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p. m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 82": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.
Anatomy Seminar, Dr. Burton L.
Baker, Dept. of Anatomy, University
of Michigan, "The Localization of
Function in Cells of the Adenhypo-
physis", Room 1520 E. Med., 1:10 p.m.
Department of Zoology Seminar: Dr.
Richard B. Root, Department of En-
tomology, Cornell University, "The
Structure and Stability. of a Plant-
Arthropod Association": 1400 Chemistry,
4:00 p.m.
Department of History of Art Lec-
ture: George Heard Hamilton, director,
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Insti-
tute, Williamstown, Massachusetts,
"Impressionism: Pictures or Paintings?"
Auditorium B. Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Student Recital: String Department:
School of Music Recital Hall, 5:00 p.m.
Cinema Guild: Gloria Swanson, Wil-
liam Holden and Erich von Stroheim
in Sunset Boulevard: Architecture Aud-
itorium. 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
The Stanley Quartet, Gilbert Ross,

violin; Gustave Rosseels, violin; Ro-1
bert Courtie,viola; Jerome Jelinek,
cello. Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:00 p.m.'
Dance Series: Ballet Folklorico of
Mexico: Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Judy Goodson, piano:
School of Music Recital Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Mc.) 11 a.mn. to 11 p.m. daily;
Wednesday 11:00 a.m. The Eleventh
Hour (repeated at, 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows
hosts an hour of news and conversation
about the arts and literature. Guest:
Chief Koko-Ita and his.talking drums.
Wednesday 1:00 p.m. Institute on'
Man and Science - Albert Wilson, astro-
physicist. and Harold Williams, U. S.
Army, respond to last week's address
by Paul Martin. Wednesday 4:45 p.m.
Campus News, produced by speech de-
partment students. Wednesday 5:00
p.m. The Press and World Affairs, with
Prof. Ben Yablonky. Wednesday 8:00
p.m. U-M Ctanley Quartet Concert -
live from Rackham Lecture Hall.
Thursday 1:00 p.m. The Asia Society
Presents - "Life and Art in Today's
Indonesia", with Mrs. Claire Holt. Cor-
nell University. 5:15 p.m. U-M Feature
Story, with Jack Hamilton. Thursday
7:30 p.m. U-M Symphony Band, another
in a series of programs directed by
Dr. William D. Revelli.
Regents' Meeting: March 21. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands no later than March 6.
Calendar Committee. An open meet-
ing of the University Calendar Com-
mittee will be held on February 27. at
4:00 p.m., in the Rackham Amphi-
theater. This committee is charged with
the responsibility for making recom-
mendations concerning the University
calendar.

Botany Seminar: Dr. A. H. Smith,
Director. University Herbarium, Univer-
sity of Michigan will speak on "Boletes
of Mchigan" Thursday, February 27,
1969 at 4:15 p.m., Botanical Gardens.
MHEAA Scholarship Checks for Win-
ter '69: all students on Michigan High-
er Education Assistance Authority Tui-
tion Scholarships who have not yet
endorsed their winter term checks
should go to Window No. 2, Cashier's
Office, LS&A Bldg. and do so this week.
All MHEAA Scholarship Holders who
have not yet picked up their $30 in-
crease-in-tuition checks for W'69
should go to 2226 SAB and do so this
week.
Education Juniors and Seniors: Ap-
lications for the School of Education
Scholarships for the Spring Term
(IIIA) and the Fall Term (I) 1969 will
be available in room 2000 University
school on March 3. Applicants must
have high scholastic standing and fin-
ancial need. Both the application and
the interview are to be completed dur-
ing March.
Applications for Graduate S t u d e n t
Dissertation Grants may be submitted
up through the closing date of Wed-
nesday, March 12, 1969. Late applica-
tions cannot be accepted because of
the tight schedule. Two other oppor-
tunities for application will be provid-
ed during the year; one in October,
another in January. Exact deadlines
will be announced. The students are

expected to have a clear statement of
the research problem together with the
estimated cost of each major expendi-
ture connected with it. The project
should have been reviewed by mem-
bers bf the doctoral committee and
carry- a letter of endorsement from
the doctoral chairman or the chairman
of the department.
Guidelines and a format for t h i s
submission can be obtained in the
Fellowships Office. Rackham Building,
Roon 1014: information by calling ex-
tension 4-2218.
The Child Development Project, Bar-
bara Sizemore, the Center for Inner-
City Studies at the Northeastern Il-
linois State College in Chicago, on Feb-
ruary 27th from 4 - 6 p~m. in the Shor-
ting Auditorium of the University High
School on East University.
Topic: "Separation: A Viable Means
for Quality Education."
SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
T ITS MEETING FEBRUARY 20,'69
Defeated To amend Article II of
the Council Plan by substitution to
read " . . . fifteen members elected at
large from the student body . . .' This
change in composition shall take ef-
fect in the following form: 1. 7 mem-
(Continued on Page 3)
I- -

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