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February 22, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-22

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Page Three

Saturday, February 22, 1969
C&ili BILD0
Saturday and Sunday
Directed by AKIRA KUROSAWA, 1961
(JAPANESE, ENGLISH SUBTITLES)
TOSHIRO MIFUNE
From the great Japanese director of IKIRU, THE SEVEN SAMU-
RAI, and RASHOMON comes another masterpiece, an Eastern in
the style of an American Western, except, "Kurosawa slashes the
screen with action, and liberates us from the pretentions of our
'serious' westerns."
Mifune, "a Galahad with lice," won the Venice Film Festival
award for his performance in YOJIMBO.
"YOJIMBO is not a film that needs much critical analysis: its
boisterous power and good spirits are right there on the surface.
Lechery, avarice, cowardice, coarseness, animality, are rendered by
fire; they become joy in life: The whimpering, maimed, and' cring-
ing are so vivid they seem joyful; what in life might be pathetic,
loathsome, offensive is comic and beautiful. Kurosawa makes us
accept even the most brutish of his creatures as more alive than
the man who doesn't yield to temptation."
--Pauline Kael
662-8871 ARCHITECTURE
7:00 &9:05 I CAUDITORIUM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HEAD START, JOB CORPS
Senators criticize OEO changes

WASHINGTON (P) - A lead-
ing congressional antipoverty
warrior has attacked President
Nixon's plan to remove two key
agencies from the Office of
Economic Opportunity. But de-
spite the harsh words, the ad-
ministration's program appears
in no danger.
Chairman Carl D. Perkins of
the House Education and Labor
Committee said the administra-
tion plan to shift OEO's show-
case Head Start and Job Corps
programs to other agencies was
a "tragic mistake" that would
leave OEO "to defend less popu-
lar programs."
Another House source s a i d
that by taking away OEO's
most dramatic and appealing
programs "we simply won't
have the goodies to get t h e
votes" if it comes to a show-
down next year on whether to
wipe out the antipoverty agency
altogether.
IntheSenate, however, Wis-
consin Democrat Gaylord Nel-
son said that the programs han-
dled by OEO covered only 10
Program Information 665-6290
TMDAY-Showso 1 :00-3:00-

per cent of the government's
over-all poverty attack.
"We need some kind of new
job creation program, fitted into
a comprehensive manpower pol-
icy," Nelson said in a favorable
reaction to Nixon's plan.
The Wisconsin Senator is the
new chairman of the Senate
subcommittee on employment,
manpower and poverty which
handles OEO legislation.
Nixon announced Wednesday
he would keep OEO alive but
would turn Head Start and the
Job Corps over to old-line de-
partments.
Both Democrats and Republi-
cans at the Capitol praised the
message although there w e r e
dissenters besides Perkins.
Some Democrats said t h e y
felt it marked a considerable re-
treat from GOP statements in
the 1968 campaign that OEO
should be downgraded or 'abol-
ished.
Nelson said that, "By request-
ing an extension of the present
poverty program, and by avoid-
ing any proposals to wreck or
abolish the program, the Nixon
administration seems to have
set the stake for a working part-
nership with the Congress to at-
tain these common goals."
Sen. Jacob K. Javits, (R-N.Y.),
senior Republican on the Labor
Committee, which is the parent
of the Nelson subcommittee,

said the message shows t h a t
fears about dismantling of the
anti-poverty program were un-
founded,
Loss of Head Start and the
Job Corps will remove f r o m
OEO about half its $2-billion
annual budget. Nixon, in his
message to Congress, said he
wanted OEO to remain as an
"incubator" for new and inno-
vative programs.
During the presidential cam-
paign, Nixon indicated he fav-
ored retention of the popular
Head Start program, but de-
scribed the Job Corps as a fail-
ure that should be eliminated.

Nixon, in his message, g a v e
no current appraisal of the Job
Corps but recommended it be
continued until June 30, 1970
while the Labor Department
tried to develop a comprehen-
sive manpower program.
At the same time, White
House sources were saying Nix-
on was not expected to reduce
budget requests for OEO. But it
was learned that Bertrand M.
Harding, acting head of OEO,
told a staff meeting Tuesday
that the Job Corps faced an
immediate 15 to 20 per cent
cutback.

Controversy widens
over Bolivian oil

I

5:00-7:05-9:10 P.M.
rnomi3 IELIN

fila

LA PAZ, Bolivia (A')-A car-
toon in the newspaper Presen-
cia shows President Rene Bar-
rientos gently patting the head
of an octopus labeled "Gulf
Oil." A tentacle entwines Bar-
rientos' leg,
The cartoon is a sign of what
promises to be a continuing no-
litical controversy over the Gulf
Oil Co.'s $140-millionninvest-
ment in Bolivia.
Another sign is the interest in
769-1593

605 E. William

neighboring Peru's seizure of
properties belonging to the
Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey.
The expropriation by Peru's
ruling military junta climaxed
years of nationalist and leftist-
fed opposition to the operations
of Standard's Peruvian subsidi-
ary, the International Petrole-
um Co.
Observers see Gulf's presence
in Bolivia as potentially a simi-
lar long-term political irritant.
They note Bolivia easily can
match Peru in a continuing sup-
ply of politicians suspicious of
foreign investors.
Nothing suggests any govern-
ment plans to seize Gulf's ex-
tensive oil and gas holdings,
however. .
Barrientos, an enthusiastic
backer of Gulf investments, has
declared its operations cannot
be touched because the Boli-
vian Gulf Oil Co. is operating
within the law.
His statement answered an
undercurrent of opposition to
Gulf. Some of Barrientos' op-
ponents question the propriety
of a recent deal between Gulf
and the government for sale of
natural gas to Argentina.
They claim Gulf has conces-
sions to develop oil but not na-
tural gas deposits in eastern
Bolivia.
A joint Gulf-Bolivian govern-
ment company hopes to start
construction by May 1 on a 334-
mile pipeline from eastern Bo-
livian natural gas fields to the
Argentine border. Completion is
set for May 1, 1970.
The pipeline will cost at least
$45 million.

Sthe,
I nws today
by The Associatcd Press and College Press Seri -ce
FREE FOOD STAMPS will be given out in two South
Carolina counties in what the Nixon Administration calls
an unprecedented move.
Agricultural Secretary Clifford Hardin told a news con-
ference yesterday that a free stamp program would be set up
in Jasper and Beaufort counties as an experiment to help
needy persons previously not covered by federal programs.
Normally, recipients must pay a small portion of their
income for the stamps.
* .
A POWERFUL EXPLOSION shattered Jerusalem's
largest supermarket yesterday killing two university stu-
dents.
The blast also wounded nine other shoppers. Police re-
portedly have taken into custody 150 Arabs in the city follow-
ing the incident.
Ten minutes before the blast, police discovered and det-
onated several pounds of dynamite at the city's British con-
sulate. Later, police set up roadblocks between the Israeli and
Arab sectors of the city to prevent reprisals against the Arabs.
Police Minister Eliahu Sasson claimed the attack was ob-
viously linked with the attack on an Israeli airliner in Zurich,
Switzerland, Tuesday.
GEN. CREIGHTON ABRAMS said yesterday the Viet
Cong will attack Saigon again.
Speaking to infantrymen south of Saigon, the general
said there was massive evidence in the form of captured doc-
uments that the Viet Cong planned another offensive. He ad-
mitted, however, that his staff could pinpoint neither a inas-
ter plan for the offensive nor a specific time to expect the
attack.
In Tokyo, meanwhile, a -Japanese news service quoted
North Vietnam's a r m y newspaper as predicting a general
Viet Cong offensive against Saigon and southeast Vietnam
this spring.
PAKISTANI PRESIDENT Mohammed Ayub Khan an
nounced yesterday he will not seek re-election next Jan-
uary.
The announcement, which came early in the wake of
four months of bloody anti-government rioting, reportedly
caused rejoicing crowds to surge through the streets of Kar-
achi and other cities.
In stepping down, Ayub warned that if no agreement
could be reached between himself and ten opposition parties
on constitutional reforms, he would impose his own solution.
He did not specify what his proposals would be, however.
Meetings concerning the reforms are currently stalled
because six of the opposition parties refuse to attend the
talks.
Ayub did promise, however, that genuine student griev-
ences would be met, that enfranchisement would be expand-
ed, and that the people of East Palistan would be given a
greater voice in running their own affairs.
THE SENATE LEADER of the fight for electoral re-
form yesterday called President Nixon's electoral pro-
posals a "retreat to expediency."
Senator Birch Bayh, chairman of the Senate constitu-
tional amendments subcommittee, charged that Nixon had
taken a weaker stand than the committee, which had pro-
posed a popular vote amendment, because Nixon didn't be-
lieve such a proposal could be ratified by 1972.
Nixon suggested an amendment abolishing individual
electors, and allowing a candidate with a plurality of forty
per cent of the electoral votes to win. He also suggested the
votes in a state be divided in a manner that might "more
closely approximate" the popular vote than does the present
system.

44

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