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February 21, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-21

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Friday, February 21, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, February 21, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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STUDENTS GO TO WORK
Radicalizing the professionals

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the
news today
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February 21, 22
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
Yul Brynner
Steve McQueen
James Coburn
Eli Wallach
"MAGNIFICENT"-Rhone
** m 0. Ol

00
o THE O
o ENTERTAINER 0
o by
John Osborne
0] 0
o Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre o
o February 19-22 o
o presented by
o Department of Speech0
0 University Players
0 0
BOX OFFICE
O Feb. 17, 18, 12:30-5 P.M. 0
Feb. 19, 22, 12:30-8 P.M.
0 TICKETS 0
Feb. 19, 20, $1.25, $1.75
0 Feb. 21, 22, $1.75, $2.25 0
ALL PERFORMANCES 8:00 P.M.
0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0

By TOM MILLER
WASHINGTON (CPS) - It
is inevitable that as radicals and
other socially concerned stu-
dents leave their undergraduate
roles and enter grad schools or
professions, they will attempt
to re-orient the goals of that
profession.
Professional meetings this
year have borne this out. Radi-
cal caucuses have sprung up at
the American Historical Asso-
ciation, American Political Sci-
ence Association and National
Education Association, to name
just a few. Medical and law stu-
dents have their own organiza-
tions to makertheir respective
professions more socially con-
scintious. And now finally, this
pattern has comee out of the
libraries and into the labs.
A re You
Interested
In
Psychology
Existentialism
SEE
Dr. Rollo May
Noted existential psycho-
logist and Best Selling
Author
at TRUEBLOOD AUD.
Sat., Feb. 22, 8:30 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE'
SYMPOSIUM '69

At a national convention of
physicists in New York last
week, two organizations from
major campuses urged both na-
tural and physical scientists to
re-examine their profession re-
garding its social usefulness.
In addition, they called for a
general work stoppage of all
scientific research on Tuesday,
March 4.
In its initial policy statement,
a group known as Scientists for
Social and Political Action
(SSPA) said, "As scientists have
become more and more depend-
ent on the government for re-
search funds and for their very
livelihood, speaking out on is-
sues has been more and more
cautious. We must strive to re-
gain our full intellectual and
political freedom."
An SSPA founder, Dr. Char-
les Schwartz of University of
California at Berkley, admitted
that his group "is very much
anti-establishment. Our purpose
is to improve the intellectual
conditions in the profession."
"The profession" encompass-
es nearly 26,000 members of the
American Physical S o c i e t y
(APS), now in its 70th year.
"We will continue to work with-
in the Society," Schwartz says,
"but right now APS is in nar-
row confines, and it has been
this way too long."
APS executive secretary Dr.
W. W. Havens, of Columbia Un-
iversity, maintains, "The Society
should stick to physics and not
involve itself with politics. We
have to discuss technical de-
velopments," Havens says. "Once
technical problems are solved,
then social and economic ques-
tions arise, and it is not our
place to speak out on these."
However, Schwartz says APS
Is ignoring its young and more
activist members. "The average
age on the governing council is
well in the fifties, but the mem-
bership's average age is under
ORGAN IZATION
NOT ICES
HillFoundation, 1429 Hill St., Fri.,
Feb. 21st, 5:45 p.m. - Traditional Serv-
ices, 7:15 p.m. - Hillel Student Services,
8:30 p.m. - "Does Judaism Discourage
Materialism?" a discussion led by Mr.
Lawrence Halpern. Harvard.

35," he says. "One of our de-
mands is for a graduate student
on the council."
The anti-ballistic missile pro-
gram is a prime example of
what the two sides of the
"young turks" revolt is all
about. Schwartz and his group
contend that contributing to the
development of ABM is ac-
quiescent in the political a n d
social implications of that sys-
tem.
Havens says that the role of
the physicist should stop when
the system is technically func-
tional.

Arab guerrillas split
over airplane attacks,

To dramatize the new aware-
ness in the sciences, a Science
Action Coordinating Committee
is planning research stoppages
at schools around the country
for March 4. The work strike is
called, not against the schools
where research Is carried out,
but instead to "encourage sci-
entists and engineers to scrut_-
inize political and moral con-
siderations before working on
research financed by the mili-
tary," and to point out the
shortage of non-military re-
search opportunities.

BEIRUT, Lebanon (P) - The
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine, the guerrilla group
which claimed credit for the
attack on an Israeli planeat
Zurich's airport, is rapidly be-
coming an outcast among Arab
guerrilla organizations.
General Arab reaction to the
Popular Front and its specialty
-attacks on Israel's El Al air-
line-has been mixed.
The Popular Front is divided
into two factions whose rivalry
has become increasingly bitter
over the last few months.
Reports from Amman, Jor-
dan, said the two factions in-
dulged in a shoot out there Mon-
day night when members of ine
wing tried to arrest the leaders
of the other.
The Popular Front is a Marx-
ist-leaning group whose leaders
believe guerrilla activity against
Israel should also include polit-
icgl indoctrination of the Pales-
tinian people.
This view is not shared by the
other commando groups, includ-
1ng the powerful Al Fatah. The
guerrilla groups formed a Joint
military command Tuesday to
coordinate operations against
Israel, but the Popular Front
was left out.
Front delegates also boycot-
ted a meeting of the Palestine
National Council in Cairo early
this month, when Al Fatah's
leader, Yasser Arafat, was elect-

ed head of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization (PLO).
The two wings of the front
classify themselves as "progres-
sive" and "right wing," but both
are considerably left of center.
The "right-wing" group is led
by Dr. George Habash, a 42-
year-old politician with under-
ground activities in several Arab
countries.
Habash spent a long period in
Syrian jails last year for al-
legedly being involved in a plot
to overthrow the government.
He was subsequently rescued by
his men at the time when the
split inside the front became ap-
parent.
Little is known about NaIf
Hawatma, head of the "progres-
sive" faction.
It was not immediately clear
which faction of the Popular
Front was responsible for the
Zurich attack. Unconfirmed re-
ports in Amman said it may
have been Habash's group.
With the PLO and Al Fatah
underhArafat's command, there
have been indications that the
front will be left to fight its
own battles by itself.
The front claims to carry out
activities within Israel itself and
the occupied territories, chiefly
Gaza, However, its most spec-
tacular blows have been against
Israel's national airline.
In July it hijacked an El Al
Boeing out of Rome and forced
it to fly to Algiers. The aircraft
and its passengers were even-
tually returned to Israel.

PRESIDENT NIXON told Congress yesterday that the
electoral system should be reformed prior to the 1972
presidential race.
Nixon said the Constitution should be amended to pro-
vide for a runoff election, with the popular vote winner be-
coming president, if the electoral college should deadlock in
a future race for the White House.
These two changes would avert the possibility that a-fu-
ture presidential decision might be made by the House of
Representatives, a prospect which arose during the three-
way race in 1968.
* *
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin R. Laird told the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee yesterday "I lean
toward going forward" with an antimissile system.
He added that he rejects Senate plans to delay deploy-
ment of the system pending arms control talks with Russia.
Laird made clear his overriding concern w I t h Russia
pushing a strategic weapons buildup and with the possibility
of a Communist Chinese missile threat in the mid-1970's.
In repeated exchanges with Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark.), chairman of the committee, the defense secretary in-
dicated he did not want to hold up on any antimissile system
until the effective date of the nuclear nonproliferation trea-
ty. He said it might take one or two years to win ratification
from the necessary 40 countries.
" ,! .
THE SOVIET UNION has launched a major peace of-
fensive in Laos, some Western diplomats reported yester-
day.
The offensive is'part of a broader attempt by Moscow to
close out the war in Vietnam.
One diplomat asserted, "The Russiansmay be playing
the role of intermediary in an attempt to re-establish con-
tact between the Pathet Lao and the government. This would
represent a big change."
In the Vietnam peace talks yesterday, the U.S. search
for common ground for negotiation ran into a wall of opposi-
tion from North Vietnam and the National Liberation Front.
Ambassador Lodge, U.S. representative to the peace talks,
commented that it is "highly unlikely that any negotiated
settlement will be' reached without the elements of the Ge-
neva accords of 1954."
ARAB NATIONS, braced for an expected retaliatory
strike from Israel, have been warned by Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan that they will be hit "in the place that will
hurt them most" in reprisal for guerilla attacks,
A spokesman for Dayan insisted that the minister was
not referring directly to the latest Arab attack on an Israeli
airliner, but yesterday's warning came the day after an El Al
plane was hit by guerillas in Zurich.
Israeli foreign minister Abba Eban asked UN Secretary-
General U Thant yesterday to call for "constructive inter-
national action" to prevent repetition of the Zurich attack.
AFL-CIO PRESIDENT George Meany said yesterday
"policemen are workers like everybody else" in taking the
first step toward the creation of a national labor union.
He added that police officers behind the move for a
national union do not want the right to strike.
"I would say there would be a constitutional provision
that they would not have the right to strike," Meany said at
a news conference.
"The police are having problems," he said. "If we are
going to have a modern society, we have to have police."
* . .
DIST. ATT. JIM GARRISON abruptly rested his case
yesterday in the Clay Shaw trial.
Garrison dropped the month-old conspiracy trial after
losing a final plea to put up testimony that Shaw once gave
an alias.
The defense attorney, F. Irvin Dymond, immediately call-
ed for a court-directed verdict of innocent to the charge that
Shaw conspired to assassinate President John F. Kennedy.

lb. -------------------------~- -

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presents!!
TOM RUSH
FRI.
SAT. 8:00 P.M. free eats, too! admission $2.00
($1.50after 2nd set)
SUN.
Sets at 9:00; 10:30; 11 :30

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TONIGHT and Saturday
TAKE A TRIP
WITH
THE INCOMPARIBLE

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

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STONED!!
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STONED!!
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MAD MARVIN at the
Vth FORUM

ORIGINAL MUSIC
Plus
INCREDIBLE HUMOR
Equals
ENTERTAINMENT PAR EXCELLENCE!

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Friday, February 21

7:30 P.M.

CINEMA GUILD
Welcomes its
new members

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ONIVERSI

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MUSICAL

AP An

SOCIETY

presents
THE COLOGNE
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
111 HELMUT MULLER-BRUHL, Conductor

"THE BLACK GHETTO AND BLACK POWER"
Third program in a series on "Negro Life and Culture"
led by Mr. Eugene McCoy, school principal from Battle
Creek.
at Curtis Room, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
Co-Sponsored by the Ecumenical Campus Centerand the
Ann Arbor-Washtenaw Council of Churches
LE METRO
Directed by LOU IS MALL E, 1960
French, color
CATHERINE DEMONGOT
"There's something not quite innocent or healthy
about this f'm." -Bosley Crowther
7:00& 9.00 7cARC'HITECTURE
662-8871 -5 AUDITORIUM

Sue Norton
Nick Chrisos
Martin Sanders
Dan Berman
Sara Krulwich
Bruce Mocking

MALE

20-30 years old to assist in psychology

experiment. Some acting experience
ferred. 15-40 hours per week for
weeks. Call 764-9494.

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Program Information 6 8-6416
TODAY-2 Big Specials

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IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
SAT., FEB. 22, 8:30

Concerto Grosso in D, Op. 6, No. 5 .........Mandel
Concerto for Trumpet in D major ...........Torelli
Concerto for Two Violins in D minor ........,.Bach
Rondo in A major ... ................. Schubert
"Eline kleine Nachtmusik"............. . . Mozart
TICKETS: $5.00-$4.00-$2.00

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Company of 7S Dancers and Musicians

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PAUL BUTTERFIELD
BLUES BAND
and
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