100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 21, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 21, 1S

art
Viewing Manet through Spanish eyes

By WALTER THOMPSON and BETH GENNE
The Edouard Manet exhibit, currently being
held at the University Art Museum, offers an un-
usual opportunity to see this artist work in a
medium where he has unfortunately received little'
publicity. Included in this impressive showing -
the first major graphics show h e 1 d by the Uni-
versity Museum - are etchings, lithographs and
watercolors gathered from collections both here
and abroad.
Throughout most of the 1860's and early 1870's,
Manet was strongly attracted to Spanish art and
culture - partially as a result of a wave of
popular enthusiasm for things Spanish which
swept the Paris of his time and partially because
of his own affinity for earlier Spanish masters.
His subjects range from then contemporary Span-
ish political events based on actual photographs
and witnesses accounts (The Execution of the
Emperor Maximilian) to Spanish entertainers

such as Lola de Valence who were the rage of
Paris and the inspiration for other artists as well.
(The poet Baudelaire attended all her perform-
ances and dedicated a poem to Manet's painting
of her.)
In shaping his compositions, Manet was im-
pressed by the Spaniards Velasquez and Goya al-
though it is clear that the artist showed a strong
inclination to invent his own means of expres-
sion. This combination enlivened the surface of
his palate with the widest possible range of tex-
tural and linear qualities.,
One of the finest pieces in the show, Au Prado
demonstrates only one of Manet's many ap-
proaches to the medium. Fashionable ladies' of
Madrid are rendered in marvelous deep blacks
and flat decorative silhouettes - a style which
indicated Manet's revolutionary approach to form.
The exhibition was prepared by Prof. Joel
Isaacson of the art history department.

U

presents
THE INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED
National Theatre of Canada
2 NEW PRODUCTIONS-
BEN JONSON'S
classic comedy
T E ALCHEMIST
with
WILLIAM HUTT
POWYS THOMAS
BERNARD BEHRENS
Directed by JEAN GASCON

Berkeley protesters engage in
tear gas melee with riot police'

(Continued from page 1)
The regents, who spent five
hours in closed session yesterday,
willc continue meeting today, and
more demonstrations are expected.
Gov. Ronald Reagan, an ex-of-
ficio regent, is expected to attend
the meeting.
There has been speculation that
the regents are unhappy with
Chancellor Roger Heyns' handling
of the disorders and that his job
may be in danger.
Under the leadership of the
Third World Liberation F r o n t,
students have been on strike since
Jan. 22. They are demanding
. creation of a college of ethnic
studies, recruitment of more non-
white university employes, and
admission of more non-white stu-
dents.
In Sacramento, Reagan said stu-
dent and faculty dissidents w e r e
waging guerrilla warfare, and the

Dnly solution was to "eliminate
them."
Meanwhile, in Chicago, more
than 100 black students at Roose-
velt University stormed the presi-
dent's office yesterday, shouting
demands for a black studies pro-
gram and amnesty for five ex-
pelled students.
A task force of police ushered
the protesters from the office
without incident. No arrests were
made.
University President Rolf Weil
told the demonstrators no decision
could be made on their demands
at this time.
At Oberlin College in Ohio, sev-
eral hundred demonstrators block-
ed tle return of military recruit-
ers, then marched on the admin-
istration building.
The protests started with op-
position to Marine Corps repre-
sentatives who were prevented

from entering the student place-
ment center and had to use a
substitute office.
Finally, they were asked by uni-
versity officials to leave the cam-
pus.
A nine-hour sit-in by 20 black'
students at Clark University in
Worcester, Mass., ended last night
when faculty and students pledged
financial support of one of the
protesters' seven demands and the.
demonstrators w e r e promisedl
amnesty.
Clark President Frederick H.
Jackson said he told the demon-
strators he would grant amnesty
if they vacated the administration
building by this morning.
Several hundred students con-
tinued a polite sitin at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania's college
hall yesterday as they waited for
Penn's board of trustees to nego-
tiate demands regarding the uni-
versity's relationship with its West
Philadelphia community.
I .r"

Au Prado

-Daily-Jay Cassidy

I

STONED!!
"stereopticon"
STONED!!
"Marx Brothers'
MAD MARVIN at the
Vth FORUM

Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

I1

A New Version of
SHAKESPEARE'S
G HAMLET
with
KENNETH WELSH
LEO CICERI
ANGELA WOOD
Directed by JOHN HIRSCH
Special Limited Engagement! 2 Weeks Only!
MARCH 25-APRIL 6 * Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKETS NOW AT PTP TICKET OFFICE
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE-WEEKDAYS 10-1, 2-5

U ________

is .. .. . .. ..." .

i

Arrest of 12 blacks
spurs EMU violence

(Continued from page 1)
Other reports indicated, how-
ever, that campus police had
known about the plans for the
lock-in in advance. Stadtfeld
later admitted that Sponberg had
been informed about the lock-in
before the arrests were made.
The governor's office in Lansing
denied reports that police were
sent onto campus at the request
of Gov. William Milliken.
Sponberg refused to meet with

the press. Stadtfeld, issued a brief
statement announcing a meeting
between administrators, represen-
tatives of the black students, and
representatives of the Human Re-
lations Commission at 9 a.m. this
morning.
The group will discuss the
"feasibility of implementing those'
demands which are consistent
with the aims and goals of the
university," the statement said.

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
Feature
Wed., Sat., Sun.
1:30-3:45-6:15-8:30
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
7:00-9:00
JOIN-IN tHE DISNEY
FUN-IN! Qo

nunnununuun

hi

i

DON'T MISS IT
Paperback and
Publisher's Remainder
BOOK SALE
TODAY AT
OLLETT'S
STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY " ANN ARSOFl

WALT DISNEY
Winnieeusydy
Technicolor,

I

11

P~T H ~ OPRTQSOX EASTERN T ATRES .. EDO E
FO L HELD OVER
35 No.MAPLERD..769.1300 3RD WEEK
"DAZZLING! Once you see it, you'll never again picture
Romeo & Juliet' quite the way you did before!" - UFE
'AA i t r R~,tP
'lF NC." FFRE:r3"
Si
ROME
4

L

NOW-2nd WE

i?:{i i::!. ""sii i<xi ::-:.:-}:":::.:::::?}:}v :''
,."..:r-' ": . :: {~v ; "..,A.... :X: .. "...r.r ~~x:; r; - ., ... i.i:.:. :h
4 .h.:...v " p "T}}>%-:.:":"v..3.::.: Si}::-d
:: v$}}: ii s;:v::....,::. v.}¢":::*:^.:n-:vv .
x: .,. :.v:r::. ..... .:'::}:v :..;.vv:::: ii:}}} : r
i": :iii{ ." r :}i '* \ I . i}i i{:%:i:;>i
:v:rriv V: :
. rff>EVIY
UIARX 51OVS~
4}} '}:"}}i:?:."-.:4
.y : :';:;x ..} .:.{.~ ? ; :~ i r~ ? o ' : s "
T:^ -}{:>:? ;::: ..t... . -x ...., ... ": '/i
>"?"t."}:iiii::::.::.-
.....: ::::.::?T:.........::.::.':::iii:":.?: ::_:P r r- m fr m at}: ,}^:}:;^:";ion j 5}:"??- 6?:2 90:::G~ri«?-
....... Show s at 1-00-;ii:..... ......:.:{:<':i:_:;:C
3:09-5:00-705 84-V1T>I ii f ii iiii}".i? i::>x}S:: ."
& 2: f 9:10 P ".:-"..:.:".:"- {J:4j I:?f w :"{,': fr:>i: N i
Ifl..... ThEtf.fl.YKflWI
r:-+~r- -Geo.ry}:e.}'? HA";:, RR;IS;:i " }fl :{
":.:v.;":.v^}'v:COLOR .by:Dse~uxe
G:Geera
Audiences :ii::":'

969
- -
a
04

i
i

"IT'S AL

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan