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February 19, 1969 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-19

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Pae Severe~

Wednesday, February 19 , 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 19,~ '1 96~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 rT w

Players show
NEW YORK (A-TIe spectre of a prolonged stalemate
baseball's pension dispute loomed larger yesterday while
major league clubs went through spring training motion
Florida with no name players in camp.
Marvin Miller, executive directorof the Players' Asso
tion, said Monday night he would recommend rejection of
owners' new proposal to contribute $200,000 over their in
offer of $1 million to the pension fund.
The players overwhelmingly rejected the original o
last month in a mail ballot. Recently, they voted not tos

iuuv contracts and not to re-
port to training camps until a
pension agreement is reached.

At Fort Lauderdale,r Fla., the
New York Yankees started their'
advance camp for pitchers and
catchers yesterday with a handful
of fringe players on hand.
The Chicago White Sox, who
began workouts for batterymen
last Friday at Sarasota, Fla., had
25 men in camp Monday-none of
them established players.
Miller said he was confident
the owners' new money offer will
be turned down by the associa-
tion's executive board of player
representatives from the two
leagues and 24 clubs.
But he said it was likely the
offer then would be submitted to
the entire membership for another
mail vote-a time-consuming'pro-
cess that could tie up negotiations
fbr three weeks or more.
The owners made the new offer,
which would boost the pension pot
to a total of $5.3 million, after re-
fusing a players' request for arbi-
tration.
"We don't see any necessity of
the intervention of a third party,"
said -owners representative John
Gaherin, adding, he thought the
owners and players "have all the
knowledge required."
"We believe their refusal to sub-
mit the matter to arbitration in-
dicates they have a real lack of
confidence in their position,"
Miller countered.
"I wasn't surprised that they
t'urned it down. But I was hoping
they would accept it since it would
provide the opportunity for the
most rapid means of attaining a
settlement."
Miller said the owners' $200,000

sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
,BILL DINNER

concern at latest offer
e in _.
two
s inx
icia- R
the
itial
)ffer
sign t.
+ s
ove-
at- .
our
atest
e it -Associated Press
con- NEW YORK YANKEE- president Mike Burke and manager Ralph, Houk view the meager turnout
nd it at training camp with alarm. Only 10 of the 27 players invited to the opening session reported, none
said. of them veterans. Similar conditions exist at the camps of the Chicago White Sox, and the Montreal
what Expos, the only others open.

Boilermakers nip Hoosiers
as Spartans whi Hawke es
ByThe Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON - Herman
Gilliam dropped in two free .
throws with seven seconds remain-
ing to give Purdue a 96-95 victory
over Indiana last night and pro-
tect the Boilermakers' one game
lead in the Big Ten.
Gilliam's free throws gave Pur-
due a 96-93 lead and a final In,
diana basket was useless as time
ran out before the ball could be
put into play once more.
The Boilermakers, now 8-1 in
the conference, seemed to be on
the way to an easy victory as they
roared to a 53-39 halftime lead.
However, the Hoosiers battled
back in the second half to tie the
score on several occasions and 4
kept continual pressure on Purdue.
Ken Johnson, who scored 29,
Bill DeHeer and Joe Cooke led
the Indiana surge but they did
not have quite enough to match
the firepower of Gilliam and Rick
Mount. Mount, the Boilermakers'
All-America candidate, popped in
32 points and Gilliam, considered
to be Purdue's most valuable play-
er, had 21 more, including the
winning markers. ?:U Rlb
EAST LANSING - A 12-point Herman Gilliam
Michigan State surge in the last

offer represented "minimal m
ment.
"The fact is they still are
tempting to short change
benefit plan."
"If I were to review this b
improvement and b a 1 a n c
against the possibilities of a
tinued dispute, I think I'd fir
Very acceptable," Gaherin;
"We'll now wait and see N
they have to say."
Miller, however, said the ow
still refuse to grant the playe
continued share of broadca
and television revenue andI
turned down player proposals
severence provisions, and life
surance benefits after retirem
"These are badly needed
provements," Miller said. "But
owners ante trying to confine
gains to the narrowest pos
area."
Asked what the next step w
be, Miller said, "It all depend
what the board thinks."
On the possibility of a po:
the membership, Miller said,
a way it does not make r
sense to have a 2%-week d
at this time." It took 21 2w
to poll the members in Decer
when the original offer was tu
down by a 491-7 vote.

vners
ars a
sting
have
for
in-
nent.
im-
the
our
sible
'ould
s on
ll of
"In
nuch
Delay
eeks
nber
rned

NO BASEBALL?
Owners
By The Associated Press
President Mike Burke of the
New York Yankees said yesterday
there is a possibility there will be
no major league baseball this{
season.
"I'd say there is "a possibility
of that happening unless the play-j
ers become reasonable," Burke
said in reference to the player
pension strike which kept more
than half his Yankee batterymen
away from the opening day of
spring training.
Only 10 of 27 batterymen re-

92 seconds last night gave the Iowa's Glen Vicnovic had 23 Illinois, led by Jody Harris(
Spartans a 78-60 Big Ten basket- points to pace all scorers, while and Dave Scholz, bolted from
ball win over Iowa and propelled Michigan State's Lee Lafayette 32-29 margin at intermission
them into a third place tie with put in 22. a 43-33 lead in the second he
Michigan. j. and the outcome was never
set w ith laThe victory left Michigan State CHAMPAIGN - Illinois all but doubt.
with a 5-4 conference mark while ended Ohio State's hopes of the
Iowa dropped to 4-5. Big Ten basketball championship The loss left Ohio State with
Michigan State had jumped off last night with a 73-57 victory 6-3 record and two games behin
ported. Twenty pitchers and seven is spelling out clearly to the play- to a quick 10-2 lead in the open- over the Buckeyes. climbed into a third place tie wi
catchers had been invited for the ers that the owners have complied ing moments and still held an While Ohio State was suffering a 5-4 ark.
first drill. The bulk of the squad with about 80 per cent in the ne- eight-point edge at halftime. its third loss of the season, Pur- 4 mark.
is due to report to the Fort Lau- gotiations." Iowa narrowed the gap to four due defeated Indiana 96-95 to Dave Sorenson led Ohio Sta
derdale, Fla, training camp next "The players are staying to- twiceIin the second half and was take a two-game lead in the Big with 25 points. Mike Price scor
Monday. #_within reach at 66-60 when the Ten with five games to play. 20 and Scholz 18 for the Illini.
In Sarasota, Fla., a Chicago Spartans put on their spurt.
White Sox official echoed Burke's NOTICE Iowa played most of the second
sentiment about the player strike, half without coach Ralph Miller.
This weekend's track meet who was ejected from the game!
ther wes togve any more," against Iowa has been changed with 16:22 left for protesting a
the owners to give in any morei to Friday nite at 7:30. technical foul called on his assist-
said Ed Short, a vice president! ant. Dick Schultz. in fro h battle 'w ith H S I
and director of player personnel.. Miller was called for a second
The White Sox opened spring
T gether remarkably well," said technical and he waved to the The freshmen cagers of Michi- tomorrow's game played their hiF
fra nin la + P ida fnr ba fr _-__ ,... .1 _ _,

Lakers end Kncks w
Celtics defeat Suns 1]

By The Asociated Press
NEW YORK - Wilt Chamber-
lain sparked a second-half Los
Angeles rally that carried the
Lakers to a 113-109 National
Basketball Association v i c t o r y
over New York last night' and
e n d e d Knickerbocker winning
streaks of 11 straight, a club
record, and 20 in a row at home.
A basket by Chamberlain, with
just under three minutes left,
snapped the sixth deadlock of the
final period and put the Lakers
ahead to stay, 105-103. Elgin Bay-I
lor's jump shot, a driving hook by
Tom Hawkins and two free throws
by Keith Erickson made it 111-
105 with 1:31 left.
The Knicks answered back with
four straight points but missed a
chance to tie when Dick Barnett's
+ long. jump shot bounced off the
rim. Baylor closed out the scoring
with a layup with six seconds re-
maining.
The loss dropped the . Knicks
three games behind Baltimore in
the Eastern Division. They blew

NBA
Eas
Baltimore
New York
Philadelph ia
Boston
Cincinnati
Detroit
Milwaukee

Stacndings

|

leads of 11 points in the first half
and 14 in the second.
* * *
B OS T ON - The Boston
Celtics rode the hot shooting of
John Havlicek and, Sam Jones to
a commanding first-half lead and
raced to a 116-110 National Bas-
ketball Association. victory over
the Phoenix Suns ,yesterday in a
matinee game for vacationing
school children.
The Celtics, who had lost two
straight and 11 of 17 previous'
starts, broke out of an 8-8 tie in
the opening minutes and then
pulled away for their fourth con-
secutive triumph over the expan-
sion Suns.
Havlicek and Jones each scored
15 points as Boston charged to a
47-29 lead before settling for a
57- 46 halftime advantage.
The Suns mcashed in heavily at
the free throw line after the in-
termission and closed to within
four points, 69-65, midway through
the third period. However, Bailey
Howell hit on two quick field goals
to pull the Celtics out of danger.
Havlicek topped Boston's bal-
anced scoring attack with 20
points. Jones had 19, Tom Sanders
SCORES
College Basketball Scores I
Texas Tech 59, Arkansas 57{
Texas 81, Rice 80
Wash. & Lee 68, Emory & Henry 63
E. Carolina 97, The Citadel 68
Thiel 82, John Carroll 78
Marietta 81, California, Pa., St. 78
Salisbury St. 74, Philadelphia Phar-
macy 67
Detroit 83, Baldwin-Wallace 79
Geneseo St. 65, Brockport St. 61
Geneva 86, Slippery Rock 72
Villanova 69, Providence 62
Muhlenberg 65, Delaware valley 64
Rutgers 76, Bucknell 70
Ashland 54, Ohio Wesleyan 31
Oberlin 82, Kenyon 61
Marquette 67, Xavier, Ohio, 54
IGeorgia Tech 84, Florida State 76
ni xxix
Y II1 !I I

training iasti r L ayf oro attieryMiller. "I
men and have 24 players on hand, ing them
- streak , all rookies except for catcher Russ the gaunt]
inNixon and relief pitcher Dan The playe
Osinski. Manager Al Lopez con-
j ducted a 2 2hour drill yesterday means of
in chilly weather, rbetato.
The Yankee batterymen report- negotiate.
ing included no veterans. Report-
17, Emmette Bryant 14 and Howell ing were three non-roster players
and Larry Siegfried 13 each. -right-hander George Rechtold N
The Suns' Gail Goodrich took: and catchers John Orsino and
individual honors with 29 points, Thurman Munson.
including 15 free throws. Dick Van Pitchers and catchers are due toB
Arsdale hit for 22 points and Ben start workouts today. Bailey is not Montrea
Warlick 17. due until next Monday. New York
* * * Both Burke and Short were dis- Detroit
CLEVELAND - Zelmo Beaty turbed at the attitude of the play- Cocao
scored on a 10-foot jump shot ers and their negotiator, Marvint
with six seconds to play last night Miller, in the pension stalemate,
to give the Atlanta Hawks a 124- although they ,differed slightly on St. Louis
123 National Basketball League concessions made by the owners. Oakland
LJVO AflfleS

he owners Still sare test-
. They have laid down
tlet. They want to fight.
ters proposed a peaceful
settlement by binding
n. We will continue to

|

ii

L Standings

I

Purdue'
Ohio State
MICHIGAN
Mich. State
Illinois
Iowa
Indiana
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Minnesota

V
8
6
5
5
4
33
3
3

L
1
3,
4
4
5
6
6
6
6

Pet.
.889
.667
.556;
.556
.556
.444
.333'
.333
.333
.333

fans as he left

the floor.

GB
2
3
3.
3
4
5
5
5
5

1 s

East Division
WV L T' Pts.GF GA

33
35
30
28
25
27

11
15
23
2
18
25

12
8
5
11
6

.,q

West Division

78
78
65
64
61
60
74
51
46
41
37
31;

219 151
207 155
160 148
183 161
170 149
213 186
166 117
154 136
135 177
124 174
136 200
135 198

Yesterday's Results
Purdue 96, Indiana 95
MSU 78, Iowa 60
Illinois 75, Ohio State 57,

victory over the Cincinnati Royals.
Beaty was the big gun on the,
Atlanta offense, tallying 35 points.
Lou Hudson of Atlanta was
right behind Beaty with 34 points,
and Cincinnati's Oscar Robertson
had 33.
The Royals trailed 31-21 going
into the second quarter, but reel-
ed off 12 straight points and
opened up a 62-53 halftime lead.I

i ,._ .. ..

,,

"It's time the players came toI
their senses and that Marvin ex-
amined his conscience," Burke
said. "There's nothing wrong with
anybody getting all they can,'
legally. But the players and Miller
will not be reasonable, even
though they have been offered 80
per cent of what they originally
demanded."
Short said, "I don't think Miller

PhilAdelphia
Minnesota
Pittsburgh
Ye

31
21
20
13
14
11

16
28
29
30
34
37

12
9
6
15
9
9

F

sterday's Results

No games scheduled.

FREH A ass Meetin
For those interested in petitioning for
SOPH SHOW'69

Today's Games
Montreal at Torofnt s
Detroit at New York
Boston at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Oakland
Philadelphia at St. Louis
Los Angeles at Minnesota

World Campus Afloat,
is a college that does more
than broaden horizons.
It sails to them and beyond.

CENTRAL COMMITTEE
THURSDAY, FEB. 2
7:30 Ppetitions cn be picked

u cp at the

fJ }}
i
.

in the
UGLI Multi-purpose
Room

mass meeting and at UAC. League
office after Feb. 20th. ALL PETI-
TIONS 'DUE FtB. 27th.

I

Big Ten Standings

gan and Michigan State will col-I
lide tomorrow night at 8 p.m. in
the Events, Building in a battle
of undef~ateds, featuring a re-
match between Detroit's top prep
players, of last year.
Ralph Simpson, from Pershing,
will lead the MSU squad aiainst
Lamont King of Northwestern,
and the Wolverine frosh's top
scorer.
In their high school encounters,
each gained scoring honors once.
In games this season, Simpson
scored 33 and 46 points in State
victories over Western Michigan
and Notre Dame while King scor-
ed 29 in Michigan's win over To-
ledo.
Seven of the expected starters in

school ball in Michigan. Matt A
derson, from Southeastern a
Dave Hart, of Ypsilanti Willc
Run, will be the Wolverine's o'
er Michigan starters. Ron G
kowski, of Detroit Catholic Ci
tral, Vern Minton, from Flint, g
Bill Cohrs of Vicksbury are
pected to be in MSU's start
lineup.
Rounding out the Michigi
starters will be Wayne Grab
John Linnen and Rick Ford. Ga
Przybylo will be the fifth star
for Michigan State,
The Wolverine Frosh compl
their three game schedule Sati
day night at Columbus again
Ohio State.

stern Division
W. L
.. 445 17,
44'2
40 20
37 25
33 31
25 38
19 45

Pct.
.726
.675
.667
.592
.521
.397
.297
.669
.593
.460
.435
.359
.224

GB
.3
8
13
27
1311,
15
18
20
2&

f

Western
Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
San Diego
Chicago
Seattle
Phoenix

Division
43 21
49 27
29 34
27 35
25 39
23 '41
14 49

Today's Games
Boston 116, Phoenix 110
Atlanta 124, Cincinnati 123
Los Angeles 113, New York 109
Philadelphia at San Diego, inc.
Detroit at San Francisco, inc.
Chicago at' Seattle, inc.
Only games scheduled.
Wednesday's Gaines
Los Angeles at Baltimore
New York at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at San Francisco
Detroit at Seattle
Only games scheduled.
AIRPORT.
LIMOUSINES
for information call
97. 3700
Tickets are available
at Travel. Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

Once again, beginning in October of 1969, the
World Campus Afloat program of Chapman
College and Associated Colleges and Universities
will take qualified students, faculty and staff
into the world laboratory.
In-port programs relevant to fully-accredited
coursework taught aboard ship add the dimension
of personal experience to formal learning.
Classes are held six days a week at sea
aboard the s.s. Ryndam which has been equipped
with classrooms, laboratories, library, student
union, dining room and dormitories.
Chapman-College now is accepting applica-
tions for the Fall and Spring semesters of the
1969-70 academic year. Fall semesters depart
New York for ports in Western Europe and the
Mediterranean, Africa and South America, ending
in Los Angeles. Spring semesters circle the
world from Los Angeles through the Orient, India
and South Africa to New York.
For a catalog and other information, complete and
mail the coupon below.

I
'
I
{
' I
1

Leroy. G. Augenste in
Professor of Biophysics
Michigan State University
"AM I MY FOETUS'S- KEEPER?"
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19-TODAY, 4:10 P.M.

PPI ETA SIGMA
presents

AUD. B

ANGELL BALL

Art student Leana Leach of Long Beach
sketches ruins of once-buried city during
World Campus Afloat visit to Istanbul.

Charter
Flights to
EUROPE
$220

SAFETY INFORMATION: The s.s. Ryndam,
registered in The Netherlands, meets international
Safety Standards for new ships developed in
1948 and meets 1966 fire safety requirements.
P ~ WORLD CAMPUS AFLOAT
Director of Admissions
PlaeChapman College, Orange, Calif. 92666
leasesend your catalog and any other facts Ineed to know.

FREE GERMAN MEASLES VACCINE

For All Women Students

information sheets at Health Service and SAB

Health Service schedule for this week

I

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